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SESSIONAL PAPERS 



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VOLUME 4 'i v^^4 ^ 



FOURTH SESSION OF THE FOURTEENTH PARLIAMENT 



DOMINION OF CANADA 






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SESSION 1925 




VOLUME LXI 



1 ~« 1986 



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10913CS 



15-lG Cicorge \' AlpluilKtical Index of Sessional Papers 



A. 1925 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



SESSIONAL PAPERS 

OF THE 

PARLIAMENT OF CANADA 



FOURTH SESSION. FOURTEENTH PARLIAMENT, 1925 



A 

Administrator for Province Manitoba.. 134 

.\griculture Department — Annual Report, 
1923-M 16 

Agricultural Credit — Supplementary Re- 
port of H. M. Tory- 152 

Amalgamation Bank of Comjnerce and 
Bank of Hamilton 263 

Amerioin bnineh factories — Corre- 
spondence 117 

.\uditor General: — 

Annual Report, 1923-34 1 

Corresipondence witii acting Minister 
Finance 108, 252 

.\viation, Civil — Report on 186 

B 

BoDtls and securities registered. Secretary 

of State 83 

Boots .ind shoes — Sales, imiports. exports. 118 
Borden, Col. A. H. — Pav and allcm^nces 

of ' 270 

Boudreau. Mde. P. F., Inkerman, N.B. — 

Di.'unis^ 177 

Brewenes. etc. — Licenses granted to.. . 132 
Bridge River Power Co. Ltd. — License 

to export electricity.. ..154<i, 1546, 154c 
British Empire E.^hibition, Wembley — 

Report of Canadian Commissioners.. 166 
British Oriental Grain Co. — Acquisition 

of elevator 165 

Brothers. O. F. — Employment of Ill 

By-Elections held 19^4— Report 34a 

Butter and cheese — ^Fe<leral grading of. 159 

C 

" Canada Is Coming Through " — Xews- 

papriM publishing 138 

Canadian riovemment Merchant Marine: — 

.\nnnal Report. 1924 190 

Offers of purchase of steamers 208 

Canadian Pacific Railway: — 
Grain hauled to Fort William, etc. 

1934 123 

Lands sold year ended September 30, 

1924 69 

M.aximum grades certain engine runs. 213 
Canadian National Flag — Order in 

Council 260, 260a 

r73*— 1 



Canadian National Railway: — 

.Annual Report, calendar year 1924. . 161 
Branch lines — work and expenditures, 

1924 82 

Colonization Depart.ment — Data.. .. 121 

Debt, revenue, to March 31, 1925.. . 257 
Grain hauletl to Fort William, etc., 

19M 153 

Industries (200 odd) estabiiifhed on 

railway Fort William eastward.. .. 180 

Maximum grades certain engine runs. 213 
Medical advisers to employees, Riviere 

du Loup 216 

Offices, Sudbur>-, Got.— Rental of.. . 128 

Water supply. .Action Vale 130 

Canning tna<4iinery — Importations of.. 249 

Canteen funds — Correspondence, etc.. . 

126 to 126/ 

Carillon power project — Correspondenoe, 

etc 154, 154d, 154e 

Cattle shiprnents on Canadian Govern- 
ment ships 144 

Chief Electoral Officer: — 

Report on By-Elections 34a 

Report under Dominion Elections Act. 34 

Report under Representation Act.. . 34c 

Civil Service: — 

Cost certain departments. 1923-24.. . 172 

Insurance — Statement. 1923-24 54 

No. eligible Superannuation Act, 1924. 224 
No. employees accordance classifica- 
tion schedules 196 

\o. permanent emploj-ees, 1917-1923. 193 
Non-residents appointed in Toronto.. 184 
Personnel and salaries — Statement.. . 129 
Retirements, Public Service Act.. .. 102 
Superannuation and Retiring Allow- 
ances, 1924 53 

Technical appoitktments. 1911-1922.. 169 

Civil Service Act, 1918— Positions 

excluded from operation of 114 

Civil Service CommisBion: — 

Annual Report, 1924 24 

Positions removed from control erf.. 114 

Coal combine Winnipeg, etc. — Report of 

Commissioner 140 

Coal lease« Dnimheller, Rosedale, 

Wayne fields 205 



15-16 George V Alphabetical Index of Sessional Papers 



A. 1925 



Coal supplies Military District No. 10 — 
Investigation into 236 to 236c 

Cold Storage Act — Orders and regula- 
tions under 39 

Combine in fruits and vegetables: — 

Correspondence, etc 95a 

Report of Mr. L. Duncan 95 

Commissions: — 
Appointed by Borden Government.. 148 
Appointed by Laurier Government.. 149 
Appointed by Meighen Government. 150 
Appointed by present Government. . . 

143, 158 
Appointed Nov. 1. 1911 to Dec. 31, 

1921 158a 

Grain Inquirj- 35, 35a 

Grain trade (last 14) 173 

Conventions: — 
Canada and The Netherlands — Con- 
vention of Commerce 86 

Canada and United States— re extra- 
dition of offenders narcotic traffic. 93 
Canada and United States — re regula- 
tion level Lake of the Woods 98 

Copyright Act — Amendment to rules and 
forms 46 

Covenant and Protocol, League of 
Nations, 1924 116 

Criminal Code — Rules (Quebec) re 
appeals against convictions 48 

Crowsnest Pass rates: — 
Dat« restored; articles affected.. .. 100a 
Judirment Supreme Court of Canada. 100 

Cu.-rtnms and Excise — Annual Report, 
1925-24 3 

CiKstoms and Excise Examiner, St. 
Leonard, X,B 250 

Customs Inspectors — Visits to Toronto, 
etc., 1923-^4 182 

Customs Port, Dnimheller, Alta 231 

D 

Dartmouth Pier, N5, — .\c<iuisition of 
site, etc 202 

Davison, J. M, — Payments for legsil 
work 245 

Destructive Insect and Pest Act — Regu- 
lations under 38, 38a 

Disablement Fund— Data n . . .,126 to 126/ 

Dominion Elections Act — Report CMiief 
Electoral Officer 34 

Dominion Forest Reserves and Parks 
Act — Orders in Council re 66 

Dominion lands — 40 mile railway belt, 
B.C.— Order? in Council re 68 

Dominion lands in railway belt — Regu- 
lations rf 76 

Dominion lands — Leases, licenses, permits 
cancelled 70, 70a 

Dominion .Statistician — .\nnual Report. 
1923-24 10 

Dorchester Penitentaary supplies 167 

Duty paid by .\merican railway com- 
panies for rolling stock used in 
Canada 96 



E 

Earthquake, 1925 — Preliminary report 
on 139 

Elections, by, held 1924— Report 34a 

Electrical energj' — Exixjrt of 154 to 154e 

Elevator, Halifax — Contracts and speci- 
fications 242 

Elevator No. 1, Vancouver— Statement 
of .\uditors 228 

Elevator No. 3, Vancouver — Acquisition 
by British Oriental Grain Co 165 

Elevators, grain, owned by Domiuion, 
etc 248 

Embargo against Canadian potatoes 142 

Empire Settlement scheme — Regulations 
re 90 

Estimates: — 

Main, 1925-26 85 

Supplementary', 192.5-26 Soa, 85c 

Supplcmentarj', further. 1924-25 85b 

Excise Act — Provisions of section 199.. 110 

Experimental Farms, Dominion— Report 
of Director. 1923-24 37 

External .\ffairs Department: — 

Annual Report, 1923-24 25 

Number cl-erks, salaries 255 

F 

Finland trade agreement — Correspond- 
ence 209 

Forsythe, L. A. — Paj-ments for legal 
work 245 

Freight rates equalization — Order in 
Council 226 

Fruit and Vegetable combine. — 

Correspondence, etc 95a 

Report of Mr. L, Duncan 95 

G 

Gazette, The, Montreal — Payments to,, 185 
Gonthier-Robb correspondence^ . . ..lOS. 252 
Governor General's warrants — Statement 

of 51 

Grain C^niTnissioners, Board — Rules and 

regulations of 44 

Grain elevators owned by Dominion, etc 248 
Grain Inquiry Commission. Royal: — 
Proceedings, evidence, documents. . .. 35a 

Report of Commission 35 

Grain research in Canada — Reports and 

Memoranda 23S 

Grenon, V. — Lease to Lower French In- 
dian Reserve 197 

H 

Halibut on Pacific — Correspondence re 
close season 179 

Harbour improvements — Expenditures 
by Dominion 133 

Harbours, etc.. Government — Tolls col- 
lected 105 

Hay, straw, etc. — Shipmetits from Cale- 
donia, etc 127 

Health Department — Annual Report. 
1923-24 19 

Hiirhwavs. Conruniasioner of — Annual 
Report, 1923-24 81 

2 



15-16 George V Alpliabetical Index of Sessional Papers 



A. 1925 



HiMoric sites, etc.: — 

Miiritime Provinces 223 

Niairara District 88 

Quebec Province 223 

Hog Kiadcrs in employ Dept. Agriculture 259 
Hutchinson, J. H. — Application for ferry 

lioense 113 

I 

Illicit stills — seizures of 110 

Immigration Act — Permits for entry uu- 
dcr section 4 119 

Immigration and Colonization — Annual 
Report, 1923-24 13 

Imperial Shipping Committee: — 
Correspondence, etc.. re ocean rates, 

107. lOTrf. 107c, 107/ 

Interim Report on Canadian Marine 
Insurance rates 217 

Imports and exports United States last 
five years 87 

Imports, apples, onions, etc., 1923-24. .. 160 

Importation from England and United 
States of shoes, etc..' 227 

Importations of various farm products.. 131 

Income tax offices — No., situation collec- 
tions 125 

Indians — Regulations re 78 

Indian Act: — 

Enfranchisements under 74 

Land sales cancelled under 73 

Indian Affairs— .Annual Report, 1923-24. 14 

Indian Lands — Remissions on sales of.. 79 

Industrial Disputes Investigation Act — 
Constitutional validity of 122 

Industries established on C.N.R., Fort 
William e:i.'=tward 180 

Ineurance companies in Canada: 
Abstract of Statements of, 1924.. .. 56a 
Report of Superintendent, 1923 56 

Insurance on Government property, 
Vancouver, 195 

Interior Department — Annual Report, 
1923-24 12 

Internal Economy, House of Com- 
mons — Report of Commissioners, 1924 92 

Intoxicants taken into N.W.Ts. under 
permit 72 

Irrigation Act — Regulations under. ... 75 

J 

Juvenile offenders detained in peniten- 
tiaries 264 

K 

Keno City. Y.T. — Sur\-ey ?nd plan 

townsite 178 

Kootenay Flats, B.C. — Reclamation of. 247 
L 

Labour Department — Annual Report, 
1923-24 26 

Lake of the Woods level — Conventioa 
re 98 

Land transferred to Province of On- 
tario and Quebec 246 

Leae\io of Nations (5th A^embly) : — 
Convention and Protocol 116 

7731— 1 J 



.Journals of Assembly 1166 

Report of Canadian Delegates 116a 

Library of Parlian^.ent— Report for 1924. 36 

Lioon.sos granted to breweries, etc.. .. 132 
I.ici n.*es gianted to individuals to manu- 

factiu-e beer 132 

Liquor seizures premises L. Matthews. . 200 
Liquor seizures premises N. M. Mao- 
Donald 201 

Loan and Truf-t Companies — Annual Re- 
port, 1923 63 

Locomotives, etc. purchased in Canada 
by American railway companies. ... 96 

M 

Mail service between Adamsville and 
Beersville, N.B 203 

Manitoba Pulp and Paper Co., Ltd. — 
Agreement with Government 256 

Marine and Fisheries: — 

Annu:il Report (Fisherie.*) 1923-24 29 

Annual Report (Marine) 1923-24.. .. 28 

Migratory Birds (Convention Act — Orders 

in Council re 67, 67o 

Militia (See National Defence) 

Militia Service — Annual Report, 1923— 
24 17 

Military District No. 10 coal supplies. . 

236 to 236c 

Mine workers of Nova Scotia — Condi- 
tions of 255 

Mines Department— Annual Report. 
1923-24 15 

Miscellaneous Unforeseen Expenses — 
Statement of 52 

Morrisburg Dam — Generation of power 
at.. .. 115 

Motor cans purchased by Government. 

366, 266a 
Mc 

MacDonald, E. W., Halifax — Appoint- 
ment of 262 

MacNeil, C. G. — Payments to by Gov- 
ernment 126e 

McDonald, J. — .Appointment of 253 

McGibbon. Dr. P — Correspondence of 
with C. G. M. M. Ltd .. 192 

Mcl^ean. Hon. A. J. — Lease to on Peigan 
Indian Reser\'es 218 

McMurray. Hon. E. .1.. M.P.— Resigna- 
tion as Solicitor General 215 

McQuarrie. J. A., Doctor's Brook, N5. — 
Dismissal 109 

N 
Narcotic drug traffic — Convention, Can- 
ada-United States .. 93 

National Battlefields' Commission — 

Fimmcial statement 1923-24 57 

National Gallerv- of Canad-a — .Vnnual 

Report. 1923-24 47 

National Defence! — 
Appointments, promotions, retire- 
ments 42 

General Orders 41 

Headquarters staff, Ottawa, and mili- 
tary districts — Retirements, etc.. . 232 

3 



15-16 George V Alpliabctical Index of Sessional Papers 



A. 1925 



Imperial Force officers employed by 
Department 285 

Militia Orders 43 

Militia Service — .Annual Report, 
1923-24 17 

Militar>' District commanders — Data 
re 233 

Permanent Force — Data as to strength, 
pay, etc 267, 268, 269 

Report on Civil Aviation 186 

Training camps for militia, 1925.. .. 235 
National Parks — Waimvright, Jasper, 

Fort Smith— Data 162 

Naval Service: — 

Annual Report, 1923-24 17a 

Orders in Council re 40 to 40c 

Netherlande and Colonies — Imports 

from 210 

Nipissing Central Railway extension 

into Rouyn 206. 206a, 206!) 

North Atlantic Steamship combine — 

Report of W. T. R. Preston 45 

Northwest Territories and Rupert's 

Land — -.^cqui-sition by Dominion.. 244 

O 

Ocean rates: — 

Correspondence re 107 to 107^ 

Report of W. T. R. Preston 45 

Ocein RatesJ Committee — Exp€nses in- 
curred by 258, 258a 

Officials Yukon Territory — exemption 
re income tax 254 

Ottawa Improvement Commission — 
Annual Report. 1923-24 91 

Overrulings bj- Treasurj- Board — 
Statement of 51 

P 

Pas Mineral Belt— Income from gold 

claims 1"5 

Passenger train traffic — Data 101 

Patent Commissioner— Annual Report, 

1923-24 9 

Peace River Block, B.C.— Data 2M 

Penitentiary employees — Data 251 

Penit«ntiane»— Annual Report, 1923-24. 20 
Penitentiarirs— Appointment of Inspec- 
tor of 362 

Pension Commissioners. Board of — 

Annual Reiwrt. 1923-24 .. SI 

Petroleum, crude, production Lambton 

Co 1S7 

Pier, Grand Etang. N.S.— Repairs. . .. 1'<S 
Pork — Import^ations from United States. 146 
Poet Office, Despres A'illage, N.B.— Re- 
opening of 164 

Post Office property (old) Vancouver. 

B.C 222 

Post Office Savings Banks regulations. 48 
Postal revenue derived from news- 
papers 163 

Postmaster, Big Beach, N.S. — Change 

of 207 

Postmaster, Glace Bav, X.S. — Appoint- 
ment ' 211 



Postmaster, St. Ignace, NB. — Appoint- 
ment 221 

Potato combine, NJJ. — Report of 

Registrar 229 

Potato embargo imposed by British 

Government 142 

Prentcr, Sam — Resignation from Van- 
couver Harbour Commission 147 

Preston. W. T. R.— Payments to.. .. 25S 
Printing done outside Printing Bure-.iu. 243 
Proprietar>' or Patent Medicine Act — 

Regulations under 80 

Protocol re levels of Rainy River, etc. 98 
Public Accounts of Canada — Annual Re- 
port, 1923-24 2 

Public Printing and Stationer^- — An- 
nual Report, 1923-24 ' .. .. 27 

Public Scr\'ice Retirement Act — Reix>rt. 102 
Public works at various places — cost.. 170 
Public Works Department — Annual Re- 
port, 1923-24 31 

Pulpwood Comission, Royal — Evidence 
of G. C. Piche and others from Que- 
bec ine 



Quebec riots — Report of Colonel 
M-achin 214, 214a 

Quebec Harbour Commission: — 
Advances to and Report of Auditors. ISS 
Details of contra accoimt against Do- 
minion Government 194 

R 

Radiotelegraph Act — Regulations and 

nmendment5 103 to 103c 

Railway Commissioners, Board of — An- 
nual Report, 1924 33 

Railways and Canals — Annual Report, 
1923-^4 32 

Rainy Lake, etc. — ^Protocol re regula- 
tion of levels 98 

Reclamation Act:— 

Regulations under 77 

Report under section 7 71 

Remissions and refimds of customs 
duties, etc 120 

Representation Act — Report of Chief 
Electoral Officer 34c 

Restiigouche-Madawaska electoital dis- 
trict : — 

Amounts voted for 145 

Persons from, appointed to Civil 
Ser\'ice 135 

Returned Soldiers' Insurance — State- 
ment 55 

Revenue collected from Toronto 174 

Revenue of Canada from various 
sources 151, 151a 

Rhineland Security Pact proposals — 
Communications 271 

Rho<lcs. Hon. E. N.— Paj-ments to.. .. 237 

Robich,^ud, A. E., Lameque, NB. — Dis- 
mi5S;il 220 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police — An- 
nual Report 21 



15-16 George V Alpliabcticul Index of Sessional Papers 



A. 1925 



Royal Society of Canada — Financial 

stat<inicnt 58 

Rural mail routes established 1934-25. 155 
Rvan, " Rod " — Non-infliction of lashes 
on 141 

St 

St. John and Quebec Railway — Acquisi- 
tion by Dominion 171 

St. Lawrence Waterway project — Cor- 
respondence, Canada and United 
States 191, 191a 

S 

Sale.? tax rebates— Claims for 97 

Scientific and Industrial Research 
Council — Report and Financial state- 
ment 106 

Scribe Hotel, Paris — Lease made by 

holding company 235 

Secretary of State — Annual Report, 

1923-24 22 

Shareholders, Canadian chartered banks. 59 
Shareholders, Quebec savings banks.. . 61 
Shipping (Navigation and Shipping) — 

Annual Report, 1923-24 4 

Ships given clearance papers to Cuba, 

etc 132 

Ships sold by the Government 157 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment: — 
Annual Report of Department, 1924. 18 
Leather goods used by medical 

branch, Edmonton 239 

Regulations under Act, 1919 94 

Soldiers, returned, in penitentiaries.. .. 261 

Soldier settlers Manitoba — Data 189 

Soldier settlement. — Outlay on account 

of 168 

Soldier Settlement Act. 1919— Regula- 
tions for settlement British migrants. 90 
Soldier Settlement Board: — 

Amendment to regulations of 89 

.\nmial Report. 1923-24 50 

Data T€ operations of since inception. 240 
Spillers interests — Acquisition of water- 
front property. Vancouver 176 

Steamships clearing for ports outside of 

Cinada 181 

Sudburv- Star building — Rental of offices 

to C.N.R 128 

Sugar, raw — Drawbacks of duties on.. . 124 
Sugar, raw and refined — Importations. 

duties 121r7 



Superannuation and Retiring Allow- 
ances. Civil Service, 1924 53 

Symington, H. J., K.C.— Payments to.. 258 

T 

Telegraph oflSees, Government — Revenue 

and expenditure 112 

The Veteran — Payments to 126d 

Trade and Commerce Department — 

Annual Report, 1923-24 5 

Trade Commissioners, etc. Canada has 

in United States 87 

Trade Commissioners, etc. United States 

has in Canada 87 

Trade of Canada (Imports and Exports) 

—Annual Report., 1923-21 6 

Training camps for militia, 1925 235 

Translators in Government service, 

Ottawa 230 

Treaty, Canada-United States, further 

demarcation boundary line 99 

Treaties and Conventions in existence 

and operative affecting Canada.. .. 87 
Treaties of Peace — Orders in Council 

giving effect to 64 

Trenton Wharf — Correspondence re.. 137 

U 

Unclaimed balances, etc: — 

Canadian chartered banks 60 

Quebec Savings banks 62 

Unemplo.vment relief — Correspondence, 
expenditures, etc 183, 183n. 1836 

V 

Veteran, The — Payments to 126d 

Victoria Bridge. Montreal — Operation 
of street cars over 212 

W 

Waterfront property, Vancouver — Pur- 
chase by Harbour Commissioners. . 156 
Waterfront property, Vancouver — ^Lease 

by Spillers interests 176 

Weights, Measures. Electricity, Gas 
Services— Annual Report. 1923-24.. . 8 

Wharf, Lockeport. N5.— Data 219 

Wharf, Matane. P.Q.— Contracts, etc.. 241 
Wharves, piers, breakwaters — Leases of. 104 
Winch Building. Vancouver — Purchase 
of 222a 



15-16 George V List of Sessioual Papei-s A. 1925 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS 

Arranged in Numerical Order, with thiir titles at jull length; the dales when Ordered and 
when presented to the Houses uj Parliament ; the Name of the Senator or Member 
I'Ao moved jor each Sessional Paper, and whether it is ordered to be Printed or not 
Printed. Also those printed but not presented. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 1 

(This volume is hound in two parts). 

1. Report of the Auditor General lor the year ended March 31, 1924,— Vol. I, Parts 

"a." to "d" and Volume II, Parts A to X; Volume III, Parts O to ZZ. Presented 
February 16, 1925 Printed jor distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2 

2. Public Accounts of Canada for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1924. Presented 

February 9, 1925 Printed jor distribution and sessional papers. 

3. Report of the Department of Customs and Excise, containing accounts of revenue 

with statements relative to the Imports, Exports, and Excise of the Dominion of 
Canada, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1924. Presented April 1, 1925. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

4. Shipping Report of the Department of Customs and Excise, containing the Statements 

of Navigation and shipping of the Dominion of Canada for the fiscal year ended 
March 31, 1924. Not presented. Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

3. Thirty-second Annual Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce, for the 
fiscal year ending March 31, 1924. Presented February 9. 1925. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 
6. See Volume 3. 

8. Annua! Report of the AVeights and Measures, Electricity and Gas Inspection Ser%'iccs 

of the Department of Trade and Commerce -for the fiscal year ending March 31, 
1924. Presented February 9, 1925. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

9. Report of the Commissioner of Patents for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1934. 

Presented February 9, 192.o Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

10. Annual Report of the Dominion Statistician, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 
1924. Presented March 19, 1925 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

12. Annual Report of the Department of the Interior, for the fiscal year ended March 

31, 1924. Presented Februar>' 9, 1925. 

Printed for distribution and ses-tional papers. 

13. Annual Report of the Department of Immigration and Colonization, for the fiscal 

year ended March 31, 1924. Presented Febniary 9. 1925. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

14. Annual Report of the Department of Indian Affairs, for the year ended March 31, 

1924. Presented Fefbniarj' 9. 1926 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

15. Annual Report of the Department of Mines for the fiscal year ended March 31. 1924. 

Presented February' 9. 1925 Printed for di.'>tribulion and .^es-iionnl papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 3 

6. .\nnujl Report of the Trade of Canada (Import,- for Consumption and Exports), 
for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1924. Not presented. 

Printed for distribution and ses.sional papers. 

7 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 4 

16. Report of the Minister of Agriculture for tlie Dominion of Canada, for the year 

ended March 31, 1924. Presented Fe'bruary 9, 1925. 

Printed for dislribution and sessional papers. 

17. Report of the Department of National Defence, for the fiscal year ending March 

31, 1924— Militia Service. Presented February 11, 1925. 

Printed for dislribution and sessional papers. 

17a. Report of the Department of National Defence, for the fiscal year ending March 
31, 1924— Naval Service. Presented February 11, 1925. 

Printed for dislribution and sessional papers. 

18. Report of the work of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, for the 

year ending December 31, 1924. Presented Feforuarj' 16, 1925. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

19. Report of the Department of Health, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1934. 

Presented February 10, 1925 Printed jor distribution and sessional papers. 

20. Report of the Superintendent of Penitentiaries, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 

1924. Presented March 12, 1925 Printed jor distribution and sessional papers. 

21. Report of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for the year ended September 30, 

1934. Presented February 18, 1925 Printed jor distribution and sessional papers. 

22. Report of the Secretary of State of Canada, for the year ended March 31, 1934. 

Presented February 11, 1925 Printed jor distribution and sessional papers. 

24. Sixteenth Annual Report of the Civil Service Commission of Cajiada for the year 

ended December 31, 1924. Presented May 28, 1925. 

Printed jor dislribution and sessional papers. 

25. Report of the Secretary of State for External Affairs for the year ended March 31, 

1934. Presented February 9, 1925. .. .Pn'n^erf jor distribution and scs.'iional papers. 

26. Report of the Department of Labour for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1924. 

Presented February 9, 1925 Printed jor distribution and ,<tfs.5ior!<iJ papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5 

27. Annual Report of the Department of Public Printing and Stationer}- for the fiscal 

year ended March 31, 1924. Pre«;nted Febniary 9, 1925. 

Printed jor distribution and sessional papers. 

28. Fifty-seventh Annual Report of the Department of Marine and Fisheries, for the 

year 1923-34— Alarine. Presented Februar>- 9. 1925. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

29. Fifty-seventh Annual Report of the Fisheries Branch of the Department of Marine 

and Fisheries, for the year 1923-24. Presented February 13, 1925. 

Printed jor distribution and sessional papers. 

30. Report of the Postmaster General for the year ended March 31, 1924. Presented 

February 9, 1925 Printed jor distribution and sessional papers. 

31. Report of the Minister of Public Works on the works under his control, for the 

fiscal year ended March 31, 1924. Presented February 9, 1925. 

Printed jor di.ftribution and sessional papers. 

32. Annual Report of the Department of Railw.ays and Canals, for the fiscal year from 

April 1, 1923, to March 31, 1924. Presented Febniary 10, 1925. 

Printed jor diUribution and sessional papers. 

33. Twentieth Annual Report of the Board of Railway Commissioners for Canada, for 

the year ended December 31, 1924. Presented (manuscript) March 9. 1925. 

Printed jor distribution and sessional papers. 

34. Report of the Chief Electoral Officer for 1924. pursuant to section 74 of the Dominion 

Elections Act. Presented February 5, 1925 Not printed. 

8 



15-16 George V List of Scsdonal Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

34a. Report on By-Electioos for the House of Commons of Canada, held during the year 
1924. Presented Februarj- 5, 1925 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

34c. Report of the Chief Electoral Officer pursuant to section 4, chapter 63, of the 
Representation Act, 1924. Rulings on boundaries of certain Electoral Districts. 
Presented February 1 1 , 1925 Not printed. 

35. Report of the Royal Grain Inquiry Commission, dated January 7, 1925. Presented 

February 9, 1925 Printed jar distribution to Senators and Members. 

35a. Copy of Proceedings of, Documents filed and Evidence taken before, the Royal 
Grain Inquir>' Commiseion. Present-ed February 27 and March 18, 1925. 

Not printed. 

36. Report of the Joint Librarians of Parliament, for the year 1924. Presented February 

5, 1925 Mot printed 

37. Report of the Director of Dominion Experimental Farms for the fiscal year ended 

March 31, 1924. Presented February 9, 1925 Presented in printed jorm. 

38. Regulations under "The Destructive Insect and Pest Act," pursuant to Section 9, 

Chapter 31 of 9-10 Edward VII. Presented February 9, 1925. 

Presented in printed form. 

38a. Amending Orders in Council in respect to Regulations under "The Destnictivo Insect 
and Pest Act " — European Corn Borer, European Buckthorn. Presented February 
9, 1925 Not printed 

39. Orders and Regulations passed under the authority of the Cold Storage Act. Pre- 

sented February 9, 1925 Not printed. 

40. Orders in Council passed betTveen June 23, 1924. and December 11, 1924, in respect 

to the Department of National Defence under the provisions of section 47, chapter 
43, 9-10 Edvrard VII— Naval Service. Presented February 11, 1925. .A'o( printed. 

40a. Order in Council No. P.C. 304, dated March 3, 1925, cancelling Order in Council of 
November 26. 1924 (P.C. 1966), providing for pay of Officers when employed 
swinging ships. — Naval Service. Presented April 2, 1925 Not printed. 

406. Order in Council, P.C. 151, dated March 24, 1925, under the provisions of Section 47, 
Chapter 43, 9-10 Edward VII^Revising Pay and Allowance RegulatioiLS, 1920. by 
cancelling clause relating to Store Allowances on page 9, and adding new paragrafJi 
(5) to Part II of the said Regulations. — Naval Service. Presented March 30, 1925. 

Not printed. 

40c. Order in Council, PC. 725, dated May 16, 1925. amending Pay and Allowance Regu- 
lations, 1920, for officers and men of the Royal Canadian Navy, dated June 1, 
1920, by cancelling clause 2 (Part I) and clause 2 (Part II) and sub.^iluting new 
clauses therefor. (Department of National Defence — Naval Service.) Presented 
(Senate) May 20, 1925 Not printed. 

40d. Orders in Council in connection with the Officers and Men of the Royal Canadian 
Navy: — 
P.C. 932— June 19, 1925, rp Transfer of Officers and Men of the Naval Service. 
P.C. 933 — June 19, 1925, re Transportation of dependents of Officers and Men of the 
R.C.N. 

P.C. 934— June 19, 192.5, re Transportation of Officers and Men of the R.C.N. (Depart- 
ment of National Defence — Naval Service). Presented (Senate) June 26, 1925... -Vot printed. 

41. Copies of General Orders promulg,ated to the Militia for the period between January 

1, 1924, and December 15, 1924. Presented February 11, 1925. 

Presented in printed form. 

42. Appointments, Promotions and Retirements, Canadian Militia (Permanent and Non- 

Permanent), Roj-al Canadian Air Force, and Royal Canadian Navy, from Febru- 
ary 1, 1924, to February 1, 1925. Presented February 11, 1925. 

Presented in printed jorm. 

43. Copies orf MiUtia Orders promulgatetl between Januar>' 3, 1924, and December 31, 

1924. Presented February 11, 1925 Presented in printed jorm 

9 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

44. Copy of Rules and Regulations of the Board of Grain Commissioners. Presented 

February 9, 1925 Not printed. 

45. Report of W. T R Preston, in respect to the North Atlantic Steamahip Combine. 

Presented February 9, 1925 Printed for distribution to Senators and Members. 

46. Copy of Order in Council. P.C. 2106. dated Novenilx'r 2S. 1924, to give effect to the 

provisioa« of section 43 of the Copyright Act, 1921. Presented February 9, 1925. 

\ot printed. 

47. Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the National Gallen,- of Canada, for the 

fiscal year ending MarcJi 31, 1924. Presented February 9, 1925 

Presented in printed form. 

48. Copy of Post Office Savings Banks Regulations, in accordance with section 14, chapter 

30, of the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906. Presented February 9, 1925. 

A'ot printed. 

49. Rules adopted by the Province of Quebec relatmg to appeals against convictions or 

sentences, under the provisions of tJie Criminal Code of Canada, 13-14 George V, 
chapter 41. Pre^nted February 9, 1925 Not printed. 

50. Third Report of the Soldier Settlement Board on its activities and operations, from 

April 1, 1923, to Maroh 31, 1924. Presented February 9, 1925. 

Presented in printed form. 

51. Statement of Governor General's Warrants issued since last session of Parliament; 

also Statement of the Auditor General respecting overrulings by the Treasury 
Board on decisions of the Auditor General. Presented February 9, 1925. 

Not printed. 

52. Statement of Expenditure on account of "Miscellaneous Unforeseen Expenses," from 

April 1, 1924, to January 31, 1925, in accordance with the Appropriation Act, 1924. 
Presented February 9, 1925 Not printed. 

53. Statement of Superannuation and Retiring Allowances in the Civil Service during 

the yeiir ended December 31, 1924, under chapter 17, R.S.C., 1906, showing najne, 
rank, silar^', age, service allowance and cause of retirement of each person super- 
annuated or retired, also whether the vacancy has been filled by promotion, or by 
appointment, and the salary of any new appointee. Presented February 9, 1925. 

Not printed. 

54. Statement in pursuance of section 17 of the Civil Ser\-ice Insurance Act. for the 

year ending March 31, 1924 Presented February 9, 1925 Not printed. 

55. Statement of Returned Soldiers' Insurance, for the year ended March 31, 1924. 

Presented February 9, 1925 Not printed. 

56. Report of the Superintendent of Insurance of the Dominion of Canada for the 

year ended December 31. 1923 — Volume I. Insurance Companies other than 
Life; Volume II, Life Insurance Companies. Presented February 9, 1925. 

Presented in printed form. 

56fl. Abstract of Statements of Insurance Companies in Canada for the year ended 
December 31, 1924. Presented June 9, 1925 Presented in printed form. 

57. Statement of Receipts and Expenditures of the National Battlefields Commission 

for the year ended March 31, 1934. Presented February 9, 1925 Not printed. 

58. Statement of the Receipts and Expenditures of the Royal Society of Canada, for 

the year ended April 30, 1924. Presented Februarj' 9, 1925 Not printed. 

59. Lists of Shareholders in the Chartered Banks of the Dominion of Canada as on 

December 31, 1924, in accordance with section 114, chapter 32, .\ct of 1923 (The 
Bank Act). Presented February 9, 1925 Not printed. 

60. Lists of Unclaimed Balances, etc., in Canadian Chartered Banks, in accordance with 

section 114, chapter 32, Act of 1923 (ITie Bank Act). Presented February 9, 1925. 

Not printed. 
10 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

61. Lists of Shareholders in Quebec Savines Banks, made in accordance with section 

58, of chapter 42, Act of 1913 (Quebec Saviags Bank Act). Presented February 
9, 1925 ; Not printed. 

62. Lists of Unclaimed Balances, etc.. in Quebec Savings Banks — made in accordance 

with section 59 of cha.pter 42, Act of 1913 (Quebec Savings Bank Act). Presented 
February 9, 1925 Not printed. 

63. Report of the SuperintcndoDt of lajnirance of the Dominion of Canada for the 

year ended December 31, 1923. — Loan and Trust Companies. Presented Febru- 
ary 9, 1921 Presented in printed jorm. 

64. Copies of Orders in Council passed in connection with giving cfTect to the various 

Treaties of Peace, as follows: — 

P.C. 318, dated February 28, 1924, appointing Mr. Philippe Roy. Commissioner 
General of Canada in Paris, France, as a substitute for the Hon. James Murdock. Minister 
of Labour, at a meeting of the Governing Body of the International Labour Conference to 
be held at Creneva, commencing April 8, 1924. 

P.C. 319, dat«d Fcbruan,- 28, 1924. re allowances to Mr. Philippe Roy, as substitute 
for the Minister of I^abour at a meeting of the Governing Body of the International 
Labour Office, at Geneva, commencing .A.pnl 8, 1924. 

P.C. 1233. dated July 15, 1924. appointing Hon. Napoleon Antoine Belcourt. P.C, as 
commissioner and plenipotentiary for Canada in connection with a conference to be held 
at London, July 16, 1924, to consider the Dawes Report on German Reparations. 

P.C. 1378. dated August 8, 1924, appointing Oscar Douglas Skelton. as Technical Adviser 
to the Canadian representatives at the fifth meeting oif the Assembly of the League of 
Nations, at Gen-eva. September I, 1924. 

P.C. 13S2. dated August 8. 1924, appointing Hon. Raoul Dandurand, Senior Repre- 
sentative of Canada at the fifth meeting of the Assembly of the League of Nations at 
(jeneva, September 1, 1924. 

P.C. 13S3. dated August 8, 1921. appoiating Hon. Edward Mortimer Macdonald, K.C., 
Ll.B., P.C, Minister of National Defence, as a representative of Canada, at the fifth meeting 
of the .Assembly of the League of Nations, at Geneva. September 1, 1924. 

P.C. 1411. dated August 22. 1924, appointing Mr. Ralph 0. Campney, Barrister, Toronto, 
as Secretary t« Dr. O. D. Skelton, Technical Adviser to Canadian Representatives at 
Geneva. 

P.C. 1431, dated August 22. 1921. authorizing the payment to Edward M. Macdonald. 
Jr.. while acting a^i Secretary to Hon. E. M. Macdonald, at Geneva, of an allowance of 
$15 per day, with necessary transportation expenses. 

P.C. 1675, dated September 23, 1924, appointing Professor 0. D. Skelton, a-s a Substitute 
for the Minister of Labour at a meeting of the Governing Body of the International Labour 
Conference at Geneva. 

PC. 1676 dated September 23. 1924, granting a living allowance of $15 per day to 
Professor 0. D. Skelton, while acting as substitute for the Minister of Labour at CJeneva. 

PC. 1743. dated October 1, 1924. advising pa>-ment of account of Hon. N. A. Belcourt. 
of $3,375 while acting as Canadian Plenipotentiary at the Inter-.\llied Conference and 
International Conference at London, from July 16, 1924, to August 30, 1924. 

P.C. 2174. dated December 17. 1924, providing for the appointment of a permanent 
" Dominion of Canada Advisorj' Officer, League of Nations " at Geneva, and also for the 
maintenance of office. 

PC. 2175, dated December 17, 1924. appointing Mr. W. A. Riddell. Ph.D., as " Dominion 
of Canada Advisor>' Officer, League of Nations," at Geneva, at a salary of $6,000 per annum. 
Presented Februarj- 9, 1925 Not printed. 

65. Return of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette, 

between January 26. 1924. and December 23. 1924. in accordance with the pro- 
visions of section 77 of " The Dominion Lands Act." chapter 20, 7-8 Edward VII. 
Presented February 9, 1925 Presented in printed jorm. 

66. Return of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette, 

between January 26 1924. and December 23. 1924, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of section 19, chapter 10. 1-2 George V, — " The Dominion Forest Reser\'cs 
and Parks Act." Presented Februar>- 9, 1925 Presented in printed jorm. 

11 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Paf)crs A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

67. Copies of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette 

between January 28. 1934, and December 23, 1924, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of section 4. chapter IS, 1917, " Migratory' Birds Convention Act." Pre- 
sented February' 9, 1925 Presented in printed form. 

67o. Copies of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette, since 
the opening of Parliament, in accordance with the provisions of section 4, chapter 
IS, 1917. •' Migratory Birds Convention Act." Presented May S, 1925. 

Presented in printed form. 

68. Return of Orders in Council which have been publi^ed in the Canada Gazette and 

in the British Columbia Gazette, between January 26, 1924, and December 23, 
1924, in accordance with provisions of subsection (rf) of section 38 of the regula- 
tions for the survey, administration, disposal and management of Dominion 
Lands within the 40-mile Railway Belt in the Province of British Columbia. 
Presented February 9, 1925 Presented in printed jorm. 

69. Return showing all l;inds sold by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company during 

the year ended September 30, 1924, together with the names of the purchasers, 
in accordance mth 49 Victoria, chapter 9, section S. Presented Febniary 9. 1925. 

Not printed. 

70. 70o. Lists of Leases, Licenses, Permits or other authorities cancelled under the 

provisions of section 3, chapter 21, of the St^atutes of 1922, An Act respecting 
Notices of CancelhitJon of Leases of Dominion Lands. Presented February 9, 
and March 5, 1925 Not printed. 

71. Report under section 7, of the Reclamation Act, 9-10 George V, showing the drainage 

works constructed, the area of land reclaimed, the expenditure and money received 
from the sale or lease of Dominion Lands. Presented February 9, 1925. 

Not printed. 

72. Retum showing the number of permits granted to take intoxicants in.to the North 

West Territories, for the year ended December 31, 1924, in accordance with the 
provisions of the Re\'ised Statutes, chapter 62, section 8S. Presented February 9, 
1925 Not printed. 

73. List of Land Sales cancelled by the Department of Indian Affairs diu-ing the period 

from February 28, 1924, to February 1, 1925. in accordance with section 61 of 
The Indian Act. Presented February 9, 1925 Not printed. 

74. Statement showing the number ai Enfranchisements under The Indian Act, from 

April 1, 1924, to January 31, 1925. Presented February 9. 1925 Not printed. 

75. Statement in respect to Irrigat-ion Regulations under the provisions of chapter 61, 

section 57 of the Revised Statutes. Presented February 9, 1925 Not printed 

76. Statement covering Dominion Lands in the Railway Belt under the provisions of 

Order in Council of September 17, 1SS9. Presented February 9, 1925.. A'ot printed 

77. Statement in respect to Reclamation Act Regulations, under the provisions of section 

5, chapter 5. Statutes of 1919. Presented February 9, 1925 A'ot printed. 

78. Statement in regard to Regulations respecting Indians during the fiscal year ended 

March 31, 1924. Presented February 9, 1925 Not printed. 

79. Statement in respect to Remissions on sales of Indian lands during the fiscal year 

ended March 31, 1924. Presented February 9, 1925 A'ot printed. 

80. Copy of Order in Council, P.C. 1S76, dated October 23, 1924, in respect to Regulatione 

made under the Proprietary or Patent Medicine Act, as amended by section 5 
of chapter 66 of the Statutes of 1919. Presented February 10, 1925 A'ot printed. 

81. Annual Report of the Commissioner of Highways for the fiscal year ended March 31, 

1924. in accordance with clause 6, chapter 54, 9-10 George V. Presented Febniary 
10, 1925 Presented in printed jorm. 

82. Report of Work done and Expenditures made during the calendar year 1924 in 

connection with .\cts (chapters 14 to 32 inclusive of 14-15 George V) respecting 
construction of Canadian National Railway Branch Lines. Presented February 
10. 192.5 ' Not printed. 

12 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Tapers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

83. Detailed statement of all bonds and securities registered in the Department of the 

Secretary of State of Canada, since last return submitted to the Parlia.ment of 
Canada under Section 32 of Chapter 19, of the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906. 
Presented February 13, 1925 Not printed. 

84. Report of the Board of Pension Commissioners for Canada, for the year ending 

March 31, 1924. Presented February 16, 1925 Presented in printed form. 

85. Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion for the year ending on 

March 31, 1928. Presented February 16, 1925 Presented in printed form. 

85a, 85c. Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion 
for the year ending March 31, 1926 Presented February 16. and June 17, 1925. 

Presented in printed form. 
856. Further Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion 
for the year ending March 31, 1925. Presented March 5. 1925. 

Presented in printed form. 

86. Convention of Commerce between Canada and the Netherlands, signed at Ottawa 

on the eleventh day of July, 1924. Presented Feforuarj' 17, 1925. 

Printed jar distribution to Senators and Members. 

87. Return to an Order of the House of February 16, 1925, for a Return showing:— 

1. What treaties and conventions are in existence and operative affecting Canada: 
(d) between Great Britain and the United States; and (6) between Canada and 
the United States. 2. How many trade comniii-ssioners, trade agents or consular 
agents the United States has in Canada. 3. How many trade commissioners, trade 
agents and consular agents Canada has in thr United States. 4. The value of 
the Canadian imports from and exports to the United States for each of the 
last five years. Presented Februarj- 17, 1925. Mr. Hudson \ot Printed. 

88. Return to an Order of the House of June 16, 1924, for a copy of all correspondence, 

letters, telegrams, reports, estimates and other documents exchanged between the 
Government of Canada, and tie Hi.storic Sites Board and the Queen Victoria 
Niagara Falls Park Commissioners, relating to the improvement, care ami better- 
ment of the historic sites and battlefields, in the Niagara District, of the War of 
1812-14. Presented February 17, 1925. Mr. Church Not printed. 

89. CoRv of Order in Council, P.C. 1597, dated September 16, 1924— Amendtaent to 

Regulations of the Soldier Settlement Board, re right of way over lands in 
connection with drainage projects. Presented February 17, 1925 Not printed. 

90. Copy of Order in Council, P.C. 69, dated Januar\' 23. 1925— Regulations for the 

Settlement of BritLsh Migrants on Land owned bv the Dominion Government — 
under paragraph (n), subsection 1, section 63, "Soldier Settlement Act, 1919 
Presented February 17, 1925 !^ot printed. 

91. R«port of the Ottawa Improvement Commission for the fiscal year ended March 31, 

1924. Presented February 19, 1925 Not printed'. 

92. Report of the proceedings of the Commissioners of Interna] Economv of the House 

of Commons for 1934, pursuant to Rule 9. Presented Februan' 20, 1925. 

Not printed. 

93. Convention between His Britannic Majesty, m respect of the Dominion of Canada, 

and the United States for the extradition of offenders against the Laws for the 
suppression of the Traffic in Narcotics, signed at Washington, the eighth day of 
January, one thousand nine hundred and twenty-five. Presented February 20, 
'925 Printed for distribution to Senators and Members. 

94. Copy of Regulations made under the authority of the Department of Soldiera' Civil 

Re-estabhshment Act, Chapter 29, Section 1, Second Session of 1919. Presented 
February- 20, 1925 ^'ol printed. 

95. Second Interim Report of Commissioner Lewis Duncan, appointed to investigate, under 

the Combmes Investigation Act, 1923. an alleged combine in the distribution of 
Fruits and Vegetables. (First Interim Report, dated August 5. 1924, will be 
found on page 32 of the above.) Presented February 23, 1925. 

Presented in printed form. 
13 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

95a. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General, of April 6, 1925, for 
copy of all papers, reports, writings, telegrams, and other documents, in oonnectioa 
with the recent investigation into the fruit combine in the west and particularly 
all communications with provincial governments in relation thereto. Presented 
April 15, 1925. Rt. Hon. Mr. Meighen Not printed. 

96. Return to an Order of the House of Mny 1. 1924, for a Return showing: 1. How many 

cars and locomotives have been purchased in Canada by American railway 
companies operating in Canada during the past twenty-five years. 2. The amount 
of duty paid b(j' American railway companies for American rolling stock used in 
Canada during the past twenty-five years. Presented Februar>' 23, 1925. 

Not printed. 

97. Return to an Order of the House of July 3, 1924. for a Return showing: 1. To what 

amouut rebates of Sales Taxes have been claimed under the legislation of last 
year. 2. How many claim;? have been made. 3. How many claims have been 
checked and paid and resulting in what total amount. 4. How many claims have 
yet to be dealt with. Presented February 25, 1925 Not printed. 

98. Convention and Protocol between His Britannic Majesty in respect of the Dominion 

of Canada, and the United States, for regulating the level of the Lake of the 
Woods, and of identical letters of reference submitting to the International Joint 
Commission certain questions as to the regulation of the levels of Rainy Lake 
and other upper waters: signed at Washington, the 24th day of Februarj-, 1925. 
Presented Februao' 26, 1925 Printed for distribution to Senators and .Members. 

99. Treaty between His Britannic Majesty in respect of the Dominion of Canada, and 

the United States, for the further demarcation of the boundarj' between 
Canada and the United States; signed at Washington, February 24, 1925. 
Presented February 36, 1925 Printed for distribution to Senators and Members. 

100. Formal Judgment and Reasons for Judgment of the Supreme Court of Canada in the 

matter of the Restoration of the Crow's Nest Pass Rates and tho General Order 
of the Railway Board disallowing the tariffs of the Canadi.aji Pacific and the 
Canadian National Railway Companies. Presented February 26. 1925. 

Printed lor Sessional Papers and distribution to Senators and Afembers. 

lOOo. Return to an Order of the House of May 7, 1925, for a Return showing: 1. When 
the Crow's Nest Pass Agreement rates were put back into force. 2. What articles 
are affected by that agreement. 3. What rates are paid on sufh articles under said 
agreement, as compared with the rates paid on the same articles in other parts 
of the countn,'. Presented May 13, 1925. Mr. Rinifret Not printed. 

101. Return to an Order of the House of February 23, 1925. for a Return showing 

1. Number of passenger trains run each week in each province during 1924. 

2. Average number of passengers on each of these trains per province. 3. Average 
*ost per passenger per train per province. 4. Average cost of these passenger 
trains per mile per province. Presented February 26, 1925. Mr. Dechcne. 

Not printed. 

102. Report of the Civil Service Commission on the administration of the Public Ser\'ice 

Retirement Act; including detailed Statement of Retirements authorized by 
Orders in Council passed from January 1 to November 1, 1924; also summar\' 
by Departments of all Retirements effected under the said Act. Presented 
March 2, 1925 Not printed. 

103. Regulations issued under the provisions of section 12. chapter 43. 3-4 Gev<rge V — 

Radiotelegraph Regulations 83a and 91a — operators' certificates; and Regulation 
104c — use of their radiotelegraph apparatus by foreign men-of-war in a Canadian 
Naval port. Presented March 3, 1S25 Not printed. 

103a. Copy of the Radiotelegraph Act and Regulations issued thereunder, with Amendments 
to The Radio Regulations since June 1, 1923. Presented March 4, 1925. 

Presented in printed jorm. 

14 



I 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

1036. Amendment to Radiotelegraph Regulation (No. 88 (a). (Department of Marine 
and Fisheries.) Presented (Senate) June 2, 1925 Not printed. 

103c. Amendments to Radiotelegraph Regulations Nos. 38 and 39. (Department of Marins 
and Fisheries.) Presented (Senate) June 4, 1925 Not printed. 

104. Statement of leases of wharves, piers and breakwaters for the year 1924, made under 
the provisions of c. 17, s. 1, The Government Harbours and Piers Act, 1902. 
Presented March 4, 1925 Not printed. 

103. An account of all revenue and all c.\|x;nditure incurred in the collection of tolls 
and dues. 1923-24, under the provisions of c. 112, s. 14, R.S., The GovernTuent 
Harbours, Piers and Breakwaters .\ct. Presented March 4, 1925.. ..Not printed. 

106. Report of the President and Financial Statement of the Honorary -Advisory (Council 

for Scientific and Industrial Research, for the year ending March 31, 1924. 
Presented March 4, 1925 Not printed. 

107. Correspondence between the Government of Canada and the British Government 

in regard to the subject of Ocean Rates and especially in relation to the Imperial 
Shipping Committee; also correspondence from the Department of Trade and 
Commerce regarding transatlantic freight and passenger rates. Presented March 
9 and 10, 1925 Printed for distribution to Senators and Members. 

107a. Correspondence with the Prime Minister's Office and the Dominion Millers' Asso- 
ciation concerning Ocean Freight Rates. Presented March 12, 1925.. .Not printed. 

1076. Correspcmdence in the Department of Marine and Fisheries concerning representations 
on Ocean Freight Rates. Presented March 12, 1925 Not printed. 

107c. Coirespondenoe in the Department of Railways and Canals concerning representations 
on Ocean Freight Rates. Presented March 12, 1925 .Vot printed. 

107d. Correspondence exchanged between the Government of Great Britain and the Gov- 
ernment of Canada respecting investigation into Ocean rates by Imperial Shipping 
Committee. Presented March 13, 1925 Not printed. 

107e. .\dditional correspondence in the Trade and Commerce Department in respect to 
ocean rates on live stock from Canada to Great Britain; additional correspondence 
from 1919 to 1924 respecting high ocean rates, also statement of the Imperial 
Shipping Committee on ocean rates on flour and wheat. Presented March 13 
and 16, 1925 Not jrrinted. 

107/. .\dd;tional correspondence in the Trade and Commerce Department in respect to 
ocean rates between Canada and Great Britain, including Interim Report by the 
Imperial Shipping Committee on Canadian Marine Insurance Rates, and Interim 
Report by the Imperial Shipping Committee on Rates of Freight on Canadian 
Flour in the North Atlantic. Presented March 16, 1925 Not printed. 

lOTg. Statement prepared by Dominion Bureau of Statistics showing ocean rates on Grain 
from Montreal to Liverpool during the years 1912, 1914, 1916. 1920, 1921, 1922, 
1923. 1924, and from New York to Liverpool during the vcars 1912. 1914. 1916, 
1918, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924. Presented March 19, 1925 Not printed. 

108. Correspondence between the Auditor General and the Acting Minister of Finance 

respecting certain statements made by the .Auditor General in his Annual Report. 
Presented March 10. 1925 Not printed. 

109. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated June IS, 1923. showing: All correspon- 

dence relating to the dismi-rsal on or about the 3rd day of March. 1923. of .4ngus J. 
McQuarrie. from the position of postmaster, at Doctor's Brook, Antigonish County, 
Nova Scotia, and the appointement of Mrs. Catherine McDonald to this position. 
Presented March 10, 1925. Hon. Mr. Girroir Not prirUed. 

110. Return to an Order of the Senate dated July 3. 1924, showing: 1. What are the 

provisions of section 199 of tie Excise .^ct. 2. How many notices have been given 
to the Government in the past five years on the part of individuals in Canada, of 

15 .' 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME S—Contimttd 

their possession and intention to use the utensils set out in the Act. The ansiver to 
be by provinces. 3. How many prosecutions for illicit stills, or how many illicit stills 
for the manufacture of alcohol, have been seized by the Customs Department in 
Canada during the last five years. The answer to be by provinces. Presented 
March 10, 1925. Hon. Mr. Griesbach Not printed. 

111. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated February 12, 1925, showing: The dates 

since 1921 during which 0. F. Brothers, Editor of the "Listening Post," Montreal, 
was employed by the Government; the Departments under which he gave service; 
the nature of the services rendered by him; and the several amounta paid to him for 
services and allowances respectively. Presented March 10, 1925. Hon. Mr. Tanner. 

Not printed. 

112. Relurn to an Order of the House of Februao' 23, 1925, for a Return showing: 

1. Revenues from each of the following Dominion Govomment telegraph offices, for 
each year, 1910 to 1921: Peace River, Waterhole. Dunvegan, Spirit, Sexsmith, 
Olairmomt, Grande Prairie, Beaverlodge. 2. Expenditures in connection with each 
office for tihe years 1910 to 1924. 3. Salaries paid to the operators for the years 1910 
to 1924. Presented March 11, 1925. Mr. Kennedy (West Edmonton). Not printed. 

113. Return to an Order of the House of Febniary 16, 1925, for a copy of all corre- 

spondence, resolutions, petitions, regulations, reports and other documents on 
flic, relating to the application of one Hutchinson for a license to opcr.ite a lerr>' 
between Rockport, Ontario, and Alexandria Bay, New York. Presented March 11, 
1925. Mr. Stewart (Leeds) Not printed. 

114. Copy of Report for the year 1924 of positions excluded under the provisions of Section 

3SB (2) from the operation of the Civil Service Act, 1918, as amended by Chap. 22, 
11-12 Geo. V. Presented March 11. 1925 Not printed. 

115. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor (Jeneral of February 19, 

1925, for a copy of all papers, agreements, correspondence, telegrams and letters 
exchanged between the Government of Canada and the Governments of Ontario and 
the United States, or the Hydro-Electric Commission regarding the generation and 
distiribution of power at what is commonly known as the proposed Morrisburg Dam 
on the St. Lawrence River. Presented March 11, 1925. Mr. Church. Not printed. 

116. Covenant of the League of Nations and the Protocol for the pacific settlement of 

international disputes. Fifth Assembly, 1924; together with a letter from Sir Eric 

Dninunond, Secretar>' General of the League of Nations, in connection therewith, 

.'ind the reply of the Prime Minister of Canada thereto. Presented March 12. 1925. 

Printed jor distribution to Senators and Af embers. 

116a. Report oif the Canadian Delegates to the Fifth A^embly of the League of Nations, 
Geneva, September 1 to October 2, 1924. Presented March 17, 1925. 

Printed for distribution to Senators and Members. 

116b. Journals of the Fifth Assembly of the League of Nations. Geneva, September 1 to 
October 3, 1924, containing summarized reports of all Plenarj' Meetings of the 
Assembly. Presented March 17, 1925 Not printed. 

117. Return to an Oder of the House of February 18, 1925, for a copy of all 

correspondence between the Chamber of Commerce at Petrol ia. Ontario, and the 
Department of Trade and Commerce, with regard to .Ajnerican branch factories in 
Canada. Presented March 12, 1925. Hon. Mr. Stevens Not printed. 

118. Return to an Order of the House of March 4. 1925. for a Return showing: 1. 

The total value of boots and shoes sold in Canada during each of the years 1914, 
1918. 1920, 1921. 1922, 1923 and 1924. 2. The total value of said goods imported from 
the United States, England or other countries for the above mentioned years. 
3 The total value of said goods exported to the United States, England or other 
countries for above mentioned years. Presented March 12, 1925. Mr. Denis (St. 
Denis) Not printed 

119. .Annual Return of Permits issued under the authority of Section 4, subsection 2 of thr 

Immigration .■Vet. Presented March 13, 1925 Not printed. 

16 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

120. Detailed statement of Remissions of Customs Duties, Excise Taxes and Sales Taxes 

ajid the Refund thereof, under Section 92, ConsoJidated Revenue and Audit Act, 
through the Department of Customs and Excise, for the fiscal year ended 3l9t 
March, 1924. Presented March 13, 1925 Not printed. 

121. Return to an Order of the House of February 23, 1925, for a Return showing: 

1. Cost of maintaining the Coionizntion Department of the Canadian National 
Railways in Europe in the years 1923 and 1924, respectively. 2. Size of the staff 
employed in 1923 and 1924, respectively. 3. Salary paid to the Manager of the 
Colonization Department of the Canadian National Railways in Europe in the year 
1924. 4. Sum paid to the Manager as expenses, travelling and personal, in addition 
to this salary. 5. Number of lecturers in the employ of the Canadian National 
Railways in the winters of 1923 and 1924 in Great Brit,ain, and salaries paid to these 
lecturers. 6, Number of families settled in Canada under the agreement made 
between the British Government and the Canadian National Railways to settle 
British families on lands owned by the Canadian National Railways in Canada. 
7. Expenses incurred in securing the said families in Britain and settling them in 
Canada. 8. Whether it is the intention of the Canadian National Railways to settle 
any additional families imdcr the said agreement. 9. Amount of money spent by the 
Canadian National Railways in connection with the scheme to settle British boys 
under the age of 17 in Canada. 10. Number of boys brought to Canada by the 
Canadian National Railways under the said scheme. 11. Amount of money the 
Canadian National Railways spent in Great Britain in connection with its Correspon- 
dence Lecture Course on Canadian Farming. Presented March 13, 1925. Mr. 
Woodsworth Not printed. 

122. Judicial Proceedings respecting Constitutional Validity of The Industrial Disputes 

Investigation Act, 1907, and Amendments of 1910, 1918 and 1920. Presented March 
16, 1925 Presented in printed form. 

123. Return to an Order of the Hou.=e of March 9, 1925, for a Return showing: 1. 

How many tons of grain the Canadian Pacific Railway hauled to Fort William and 
Port .Arthur during the calendar year 1924. 2. Number of ton miles. 3. Rate per 
ton mile. 4. Average haul. 5. How many tons of grain the Canadian Pacific Railway 
hauled to Vancouver in the calendar year 1924. 6. Number of ton miles. 7. Rate 
per ton mile. 8. Average haul. 9. Total percentage of grain hauled in western 
territory to the entire revenue tonnage of that territory in 1924. 10. What percentage 
of the total ton miles in the western territory in 1924 grain produced. 11. What 
percentage of the total freight revenue carried in western territory in 1924 was by 
the carriage of grain. Presented March 16, 1925. Mr. Hudson Not printed. 

124. Return to an Order of the Hou.se of March 9, 1925, for a Return showing, during 

the fiscnl years 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923 and 1924, what drawbacks of duties on raw sugar 
were paid in respect of (a) sugar exported; and (b) sugar consumed in Canada. 
Presented March 16, 1925. Mr. Wallace Not printed. 

I24a. Return to an Order of the House of March 9, 1925. for a Return showing: 1. 
From what countries raw .sugar was imported into Canada, and how much from each, 
during the years 1920. 1921. 1922. 1923 and 1924. 2. Aggregate amount of customs 
duties paid thereon, (a) under the general tariff and (6) under the preferential tariff. 
3. From what countries refined sugar was imported into Canada and how much 
from each, during the above-mentioned years. 4. Aggregate amount of customs 
duties paid thereon, (o) under the general tariff and (6) under the preferential tariff. 
Presented March 23, 1925. Mr. Wallace Not printed. 

125. Return to an Order of the House of March 9, 1925, for a Return showing: 1. 

How many Dominion Government Taxation offices for collection of income taxes 
there ar? in Canada. 2. Where they are situated. 3. The amount of income taxes 
collected in each such office. Presented March 16, 1925. Hon. Mr. Manion. 

Not printed. 

126. Memorandum and correspondence respecting Canteen Funds and the Disablement 

Fund. Presented March 17, 1925 Not printed. 

17 

7734—2 



i 



15-16 CloorKc ^ 1-ist of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



COIVTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

126a. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated March 19, 1925, to include: (a) The deed 
of trust or :iny letter, document, paper, writing, Order in Council or other written 
record which sets out, affects, bears upon or relates to the creation of a trust in 
connection with the fund comTnonly known as the Disablement Fund; (6) a state- 
ment of the said fund, showinc receipts and expenditures from its inception imtil the 
present time ; and (c) copies of all correspondence including statements of expendi- 
tures of money passing between the trustee and any Veterans' organizations to whom 
any sums of money have been paid since the inception of the said fund. Presented 
April 21, 192.5. Hon. Mr. Griesbach Not prinled. 

1266. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated April 21, 1926, showing: (a) A copy of 
Ordei- in Council, P.C. 2.378, of the 5th of July, 1921. under which the sum of fifty 
thousand dollars (§50,000) was paid to John Bamctt, N. F. Parkinson, R. B. Max- 
well and C. 0. MacNei!, trustees for the Great War Veterans' Association; and (6) 
A statement showine how the said sum or any portion thereof was expended. 
Presented April 2S, 1925. Hon, Mr. Griesbach Not printed. 

126c. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated March 19. 1925, showing: (a) A copy 
of the Order in Council P.C. 3887. of the 12th of October, 1921. whereby the sum of 
$120,000 was authorized to be p:iid from the Canteen Funds to J. \V. Margeson, 
T. O. Cox and W. C. Arnold, as trustee for distribution among organizations of ex- 
service men: (b) A statement showing how the s;iid sum. or any portion thercoif, was 
expended; and (c) Copie.s of all correspondence passing between the trustees and any 
Department of the Government, and the trustees and any organizations of 
ex-service men. Presented May 7, 1925. Hon. Mr. Griesbach Not printed. 

126d. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated May 12, 1925, showing: (a) The amounts 

of money paid by the Government to a magazine or similar publication called the 

"Veteran"; (6) The purpose or reasons for which such payments were made; and 

(jc) The authority therefor. F"or reference, see report of the Auditor General 1922- 

23, section YY, pages 190 to 193. Presented May 27, 1925. Hon. Mr. Griesbach. 

Not printed. 

126e. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated May 12, 1925, showing:— (a) The amounts 
of money paid by the Government to C. G. MacNeil or the Great War Veterans' 
Association in connection with the enquiry of the Royal Commission on pensions 
and re-establishment; (b) For a statement showing amounts of money paid by the 
Government to Mr. Bowler, ban-ister. of Winnipeg, for legal, or other charges, 
in connection with the enquir>- of the Royal Commission on pensions and re-estab- 
lishment ; and — {r) Showing authority for such payments, for what purposes, and 
the dates when the same were made. Presented May 27, 1925. Hon. Mr. 
Griesbach Not printed. 

126/. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated May 12, 1925, showing:— (a) Copy of the 
memorandum submitted by C. G. MacNeil, Dominion Secretary-Treasurer of the 
G.W.V..\. of Canada, to the Honourable the Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-e^tab- 
lishmenl and referred to in a letter of June 10, 1924, from C. G. MacNeil afore- 
said, to E. H. Scammell, Assistant Deputy Minister, Department oj SoWier.t' 
Cii'il Re-establishment: (b) .\ copy of an itemized statement of the expenditure 
of a loan of $15,000 from the Disablement Fund made under P.C. 1596 of 1924 
to the Dominion Veterans' Alliance, such itemized statement being referre<i to in 
a letter dated January 5, 1925, from E. H. Scammell, Assistant Deputy Minister. 
D.S.C.R.. to C. G. MacNeil. Secretary. Dominion Veterans' .\lliance; and — (c) If 
the full amount has not been expended by whoever received the said sum. then 
.".n itemized statement of such portion as has been expended in accordance with 
the letter from E. H. Scammell. Deputy Minister of D.S.C.R., to C. G. MacNeil, 
Chairman. Dominion Veterans' Alliance, dated October 2, 1924. Presented Mav 
27, 1925. Hon. Mr. Griesbach Not prinled. 

127. Return to an Order of the Hotise of March 16. 1925. for a Return showing: — 1. Car- 
loads of hay and straw shipped from the following points in Ontario, on the 
Canadian National Railways in 1923 and 1924: — Caledonia, Hagersville, Seneca, 
Middleport. Canfield 2. C.arload« of other farm produce .^hipped during the same 
period from these points. 3. Crirloads of other merchandise shipped during the 
same period from those points. Preooiited March 19. 192.i. Mr. Penn 

Not printed. 
18 



15-16 I'.cYirgc V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5—Continiied 

128. Return to an Order of the House of March 9. 1925, for a copy of all correspondence, 

do<:uments and comiiiiinications exchanged between the officials of the Canadian 
National Rail'nays and the owners of the Sudbury Star Building, Sudbury, Ontario, 
relating to the rental of offices in Sudbury. Pi^escnted March 19, 1925. Mr. 
Lapierre A'ot printed. 

129. Statement of Civil Service Personnel and Salaries m the month of January, 1912-1924, 

prepared by Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Presented March 19, 1925. 

Presentea in prinlea form. 

130. Return to an Order of the House of March 2, 1925, for a copy of all correspondence, 

letters, telegrams, reports and other dcKniments sent by the superintendents to the 
General Superintendent. Pre.'ident and First Vice-President of the Canadian 
National Railways, in connection with the granting of a contract for supplying 
water to the Canadian National Railways, im'huling .\cton Vale station and the 
Acton Vale National .\queduct and Power Company, represented by Mr. H. 
Begin, of Montreal. Also a copy of contract prepared and presented to be signed 
in the month cf June. 1924. .\iso copy of contract as amended, copy of tenders 
sent by the city council of .\ct.on Valo, for supplying water to the Canadian 
National Railways, as well as to the siid station. Also all correspondence 
exchanged between the Canadian National officials and the officials of the city 
of .\cton Vale. Board of Trade of the county of Bagot, and others. Presented 
March 19. 1925. Mr. Marcile (Bagot) Not printed. 

131. Return to an Order of the House of March 9, 1925, for a Return showing tie 

importations into Canada from United State.s and other countries, respectively, 
during the year 1921, of the fallowing farm products: (a) live cattle; (6) horses; 
(r) sheep; ((/) fresh fniits; (c) dried fruits; (/) grain; (g) meats, including beef 
and pork products; (/i) dairy products; (f) seeds; (;') potatoes, turnips and 
sugar beet.s: (k) eggs; {V\ wool; (m) all other farm products not enumerated 
a;bove. Presented March 19, 1925. Mr. Doucet Not printed. 

132. Return to an Order of the House of February 23, 1925, for a Return showing:— 

1. Licenses granted to Breweries and Distilleries issued annually. 2. Number of 
Brewery and Distillery licenses granted or renewed in the Province of Ontario 
in the years 1922, 1923, 1924, and the present year to date. 3. How many of these 
licenses granted or renewed without the consent of the Ontario Government. 4. 
Whether permits or licenses arc granted annually to persons in Ontario giving 
them the rieht to manufacture beer or liquor to be consumed in their homes. 
5. If so, the number of such permits or licenses granted or renewed in each 
constituency in the Province of Ontario from January 1, 1924, to December 31, 
1924. and during this year to date. 6. Number of ships or boat.s given cle-.irance 
papers for Cuba and Mexico, from ports in the Province of Ontario in 1924. 
7. How many of such ships carried liquor. Presented March 23. 1925. Mr. 
Faasher Not printed. 

133. Return to an Order of the House of July 2. 1924. for a Return showinfl:— 1. The total 

amount paid by the Dominion Government for haAour improvements at each cf 
the following ports: Halifax, St. John. Oudbec, Montreal. Fort William, Port 
Arthur. Vancouver, Prince Rupert. Fort Nelson, (a) by way of loan; (h) other- 
wise. 2. The total amount p?jd by the Dominion Government since Confedera- 
tion for all other harbour improvements, such as wharfs, piers, breakwaters, 
jetties, dredging or other harbour and river improvement," in each of the nine 
provin'Ces; and («) what percentage of the work done is estimated as permanent; 
(fc) what percenta/go must be renewed annually: (r^ what percentage must be 
renewed every five years: (</'' what percentage must he renewed cverv fen years. 
Presented March 23, 1925. Mr. Kennedy (Weal Edmonton) .\'o( printed. 

13I-. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of June 30. 1924, for 
a copy of all correspondence since June 1, 1924, between the Prime Minister and 
the Government, the Lieutenant-Governor or any Judee of the Province of 
M.initoba, relating to the appointment of an .Adininist.rator for said province, to 
act during the absence of the Lieutenant-Governor. Persented March 23. 1925. 
Rt. Hon. Mr. Meiahen Not printed. 

19 

7731—21 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

133. Returu to an Order of the House of February 23, 1925, for a Return showing: — 

1. Number of persons of the electoral district of Restigouche-Madawaska who 
have obtained employment in the inside of the Civil Service, since Januarj' 1. 1906. 

2. Their names and date of appointment. Presented March 23, 1925. Mr. Jones. 

Not printed. 

136. Return to an Order of the House of April 30, 1924, for a copy of all evidence or state- 

ments made before the Royal Pulpwood Commission by Mr. Piche and other 
witnesses, members or officers of the Government of Quebec. Presented March 
23, 1925. Hon. Mr. Stevens Not printed. 

137. Return to an Order of the House of March 11, 1925, for a copy of all correspondence 

passing between January 1, 1922, and June 27, 1924, between the Minister or 
officer of the Department of Public Works and the Member for the time being of 
the riding of West Hastings, referring in any way to the Trenton wharf. Presented 
March 23, 1925. Hon. Mr. Stevens Not printed. 

138. Return to an Order of the House of February 6, 1925, for a return showing a list of 

all newspapers given publication of the advertisement " Canada is Coming Through " 
and thf? amount of money paid or to be paid to each. Presented March 24, 
1925. Mr Arthurs Not printed. 

139. Preliminary Report on the earthquake of February 2S, 1925, by Ernest A. Hodgson, 

Seismologist. Presented March 24, 1925 Not printed. 

140. Report of the Commissioner appointed to investigate, under the Combines Investiga- 

tion Act, 1923, an alleged combine amongst coal dealers at Winnipeg and other 
places in Western Canada, 1924-25. Presented March 25, 1925. 

Presented in printed form. 

141. Return t« an Order of the House of June 9, 1924, for a copy of all telegrams, letters 

or other messages, or documents, despatched from the Department of Justice 
to the authorities of Port.^mouth Penitentiary, respecting the non-infliction of 
lashes on the person commonly known as " Red " Ryan. Presented March 25, 
1925. Mr. Ryckman Not printed. 

142. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General March 2, 1925, 

for a copy of all correspondence, documents, statements and communications 
between the Government of Canada and/or the High Commissioner of Canada 
and the Government of the United Kingdom and or any Department of the 
Government of the United Kincdom or anj' officer thereof, relating to the imposi- 
tion of an emhariio by the Govemmont of the United Kingdom against Canadian 
potatoes. Pre.sonted March 25, 1925. Mr. Hanson Not printed. 

143. Supplementary Return to an Order of the House of May 12, 1924, for a Return 

showing: — 1. Number of Commissions of Enquiry appointed by the present 
Government. 2. Total cost of the«e Commissions. 3. Names of the counsel 
employed by the Government. 4. Total remuneration paid to each. Presented 
March 25, 1925. Mr. Leader Ndt printed. 

144. Return to an Order of the House of March 16. 1925, for a Return showing: — 

1. Whether any Canadian Government Merchant Marine steamers have carried 
cattle from Montreal, or other Canadian ports, to i>orts in Great Britain or the 
Continent, during the years 1922. 1923 and 1924. If so. to what ports. 2 Number 
of cattle carried each voyage. 3. Rate of freight paid. 4. Net result of thi* 
business, vovage bv vovace. 5. Profit or loss, as the case may be. Presented 
March 26. 1925. Mr. Black (Halif.ax) Not printa'. 

145. Return to an Order of the House of February 23. 1925, for a Return showing: — 

I. Amounts voted for the electoral district of Restieouche-Madawa!=ka. since 
January 1, 1906. 2. Amounts expended. Presented March 26, 1925. Mr. Jones. 

Nnl printed. 

146. Return to an Order of the House of March 4. 1925. for a Return showing: — 1. .\raount 

of pork imported into Canada from the United States during the calendar years 
1923 and 1924. in pounds and dollars respectively. 2. What amount of ihis pork 
was re-exported to England and price received for it. 3. How it was propnrcd in 
Canada for re-export. 4. Whether if is sold in Eneland as Canadian pork, and, 
if not, how it is differentiated from the Canadian product. Presented March 26, 

1925. Mr. Anderson Not printed. 

20 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

147. Return to an Order of the House of March IS, 1925, for a copy of all correspondence 

between R. E. Beattie, or Fergus McDonald of Vancouver, and the Minister of 
Public Works, relative to the proposed retirement of Mr. Sam Prenter from the 
Board of Harbour Comniissioacrs. Vancouver, British Columbia; aiso, all 
correspondence between any persons in Vancouver, British Columbia, and the 
Minister of Public Works, or any Minister or otRcial of the Government, relative 
to retirement of said Mr. Prenter, or other members of the Vancouver Board of 
Harbour Commissioners. Presented March 27, 1925. Hon. Mr. Stevens. 

Not printed. 

148. Supplement.ary Return to an Order of the House of May 12, 1924, for a Return 

showing: — 1. Number of Commi.ssions of Enqmry appointed by the Borden 
Government. 2. Total cost of these Commissions. 3. Names of the couiLsel 
emploved bv the Government. 4. Total remuneration paid to each. Presented 
March 30, 1925. Mr. Loader Not printed. 

149. Supplementary Return to an Order of the House of May 12, 1924, for a Return 

showms: — 1. Number of Commissions of Enquiry appointed by the Laurier 
Government. 2. Total cost of these Commi.-^ions. 3. Names of the counsel 
employed by the Government. 4. Total remuneration paid to each. Presented 
March 30, 1925. Mr. Leader Not printed. 

150. Supplementary Return to an Order of the House of May 12. 1924, for a Return 

showing: — 1. Number of Commissions of Enquiry appointed by the Meiehen 
Government. 2. Total cost of these Commissions. 3. Names of the counsel 
employed by the Government. 4. Total remuneration paid to each. Presented 
March 30, 1925. Mr. Leader Not printed. 

151. Return to an Order of the House of July 7, 1924, for a Return showing: — 1. The 

total revenue of Canada from all sources for the year ending March 31, 1923, 
also year ending March 31, 1924, giving each year separately and each source of 
revenue of all kinds separately. 2. How much of this revenue was contributed 
by each one of the nine provinces separately, giving ever>- source of revenue 
separately. Presented March 30, 1925. Mr. McCrea Not printed. 

151a. Return to an Order of the House of May 11, 1925, for a Return showing: — 1. Total 
revenue of Canada for the years ending March 31. 1922. 1923. 1924 and 192.5, 
respectively, from the following sources, import duty, excise duties, excise taxes, 
Income War Tax, Business Profits War Tax, any other sources. 2. What per 
cent of the amount received was the cost of collection in each case. Presented 
June 23 1925. Mr. Ross (Simcoe) Not printed. 

132. Supplementarj- Report on Agricultural Credit, by H. M. Tory, dated March 30. 1925. 
Presented March 31. 1925 Printed jot distribution to Senators and Members. 

153. Return to an Order of the House of March 9. 1925, for a Return showing: — 1. How 

many tons of grain the Canadian National Railways hauled to Fort William and 
Port .\rthur during the calendar year 1924. 2. Number of t^n miles. 3. Rate per 
ton mile. 4. Average haul. 5. How many tons of grain the Canadian National 
Railways hauled to Vancouver in the calendar year 1924. 6. Number of ton miles. 
7. Rate per ton mile. 8. Average haul. 9. Total percentage of grain hauled in 
western territory to the entire revenue tonnage of that territorj- in 1924. 10. 
What percentage of the total ton miles in the western territory in 1924 grain 
produced. 11. What percentage of the total freight revenue carried in western 
territory' in 1924 was by the carriage of grain. Presented March 31. 1925. Mr. 
Hudson Not printed. 

154. Correspondence, applications, and other documents respecting licenses to export 

electrical energy, for the fiscal year 1925-26. under the provisions of the Electricity 
and Fluid Exportation Act, Chapter 16. of Statutes of 1907; also, copy of Order in 
Council. P.C. 504, dated March 31, 1925, in connection therewith. Presented 

April 1, 1925 Not printed. 

154a. Copy of Order in Council. P.C. 569. dated April 18. 1925: Regulations passed pursuant 
to Section 9 of the Electricity and Fluid Exportation Act. Chapter 16 of the 
Statutes of 1907. governing the collection of the export duty on power. Presented' 

April 23, 1925 Not printed^ 

21 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

1546. Copy of correspondence relating to the issue of a license to the Bridge River Power 
Company, Limited, to export electrical energy under the provisions of the 
Electricity and Fluid Exportation Act. 6-7 Edward VII, Chapter 16. and copy of 
Order in Council, P.C. 499, dated March 29. 1924, granting licenses to export 
electrical energy to certain companies mentioned therein. Presented May 15. ID'J.i. 

Not printed. 

154f. Further correspondence relating to the issue of a license, under the provisions of the 
Electricity and Fluid Exportation Act, 6-7 Edward ^^l. Chapter 16. to the Bridge 
River Power Company, Limited, to export electrical energy, also copies of 
Orders in Council in connection therewith. Presented May 18, 1925. .Not jtrinted. 

154d. Correspondence, Orders in Council, etc., in connection with the Carillon Power 
Development from 1906 to 1924; also copies of draft leases in connection there- 
with to the Carillon Industrial Corporation. Limited; also copy of furthtr leases 
and bonds of indemnity. Presented May 18. 1925 Not printed. 

154e. Correspondence between the Premier of Ontario and the Prime Minister of Canada 
respecting the development of additional power at Carillon Rapids on the 
Ottawa river. Presented Maj' 19, 1925 Not printed. 

155. Return to an Order of the House of March 16, 1925, for a Return showing: — 

1. Whether the Government established any Rural Mail Routes in the years 
1924 or 1925. 2, Whether any tenders have been asked for in connection with 
any proposed routes. If so, in what counties, and, from what post offices. 
3. Whether it is the policy of the Government to establish any new mail routes. 
Presented April 2, 1925. Mr. Maybee Not printed. 

156. Return to an Order of the House of iMarch 11, 1935, for a Return showing: — 1. How 

much the Vancouver Board of Harbour Commissioners paid for the witerfront 
property lying immediately east of and adjoining No. 1 Harbour Board elevator, 
portion of which is now occupied bi' elevator known as Spi'lers elevator. 2. The 
total area of the said property: (a) above high water mark; (b) below high water 
mark. 3. Whether the said property w.as offered to the Harbour Board for 
$275,000. 4. Whether the said price of $275,000 included a sawmill and buildings 
then on the property. 5. Whether the Harbour Board secured an option at this 
price and if so. for how long. 6. Subsequent to the purchase of the said property, 
whether the Harbour Commissioners permited the former owners to remove the 
jnill and other buildings, or to whom the s;ud mill was sold, or given, or released. 
7. Whether a portion of the said property was leased to R. H. Gale of Vancouver, 
acting for himself or a company, and if the latter, the name of the company to 
•whom the lease was issued. 8. Whether the said R. H. Gale negotiated the said 
lease. 9. Whether there has been any transfer of the said lease since the original 
issue. If so. to whom. 10. Amount of rental being paid to the Harbour Com- 
missioners for the said lease. 11. Whether the Harbour Commissioners undertook 
to build a jetty for grain conveyors as a condition or term in the said lease. If so. 
what the sue! jetty and conveyors and equipment cost. 12. Whether the said 
original lease, or a later transferred lease has been assigned to the " Spillers " 
Grain Company of England. Presented April 2, 1925. Mr. Black (Yukon). 

Not printed. 

157. Return to an Order of the House of April 7. 1924. for a return showing the names or 

numbers of all ships or boats of everj- class and description, whether naval or 
merchant or fishing craft, which were sold by the Government of Canada or 
any Department thereof, or by any Commission acting in behalf of the Govern- 
ment, or under the authority of the Parliament of Canada since the signing of 
the Armistice, showing: ia) the prices paid for said ships, vessels or boats on 
their purchase by the Canadian authorities, and also the price received lor each 
iwhen sold; ib) the number of ships, vessels or boats on hand wh.ch the 
Government of Canada or any Department thereof, or any Commission acting 
under the authority of the Government or Parliament of Canada, have for 
sale, with their names and numbers and showing where they are at present; 
(c) the contract price to be paid to the Government of Canada, or any Depart- 
ment thereof, as the purchase price of any ship, vessel or boat sold as herein- 
22 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

before referred to, and how the said .payments were made, and also the out- 
standing sums due on payment, if any, and from whom, the said return to show 
all purchasers of any and all of the hereinbefore mentioned ships, vessels and 
boats, and their addresses; id) all other details in anywise relating or appertaining 
to the foregoing. Presented April 2, 1925. Mr. Martell Not, printed. 

158. Ketum to an Order of the House of March 4, 1925, for a Return showing: — 

I. Number of Royal Commissions appointed iby the present Government. 2. Their 
personnel. 3. Cost of each to date. Presented April 3, 1925. Hon. Mr. Manion. 

Not printed. 

138a. Return to an Order of the House of March 9, 1925, for a Return showing: — 1. How 
jnany Royal Commissions were ajjpointed by the Federal Government from 
November 1, 1911, to December 31, 1921. 2. Their personnel. 3. The cost of 
each. Presented .4pril 3, 1925. iMr. Forrester Not printed. 

159. Return to an Order of the House of March 30, 1925, for a Return showing: — 1. When 

Federal grading of butter and cheese for export came into efTect. 2. Tho names 
and salaries of the Dominion graders of butter and cheese. 3. The standard 
grades for butter and what determines each grade. 4. The recognized difference 
in price of the several grades. 5. From the time Federal grading went into effect, 
quantity of (a) pasteurized, (6) unpasteurized butter exported each year to the 
end of 1924. 6. Whether the grade was stamped on all packages of butter exported 
and what quantity of each grade was exported in each year. 7. The standard 
grades for cheese and the recognized difference in price of the several grades. 
8. Whether any cheese has been exported to Great Britain since Federal grading 
went into effect without the grade being clearly indicated, and if so, when and 
what quantity. 9. Quantities of (a) graded and (b) ungraded cheese exported 
from Canada to Great Britain in each of the calendar years 1921, 1922, 1923 and 
1924. 10. Quantities of each arrade exported to Great Britain in 1923 and 1924. 

II. Whether the producer of the cheese must abide by the decision of the Federal 
graders as to the .grade of his cheese or whether there is any person or beard to 
whom he can appeal again.st their classification. Presented April 6, 19i;5. Mr. 
Stewart (Leeds) Not printed. 

160. Return to an Order of the House of April 6. 1925. for a Return showing: — 1. What 

have been during the fiscal year 1923-24. month by month and in each province 
separately, the imports of each of the following articles; apples, onions, potatoes, 
tomatoes, butter and eggs. 2. The United States duty on each of these articles. 
Presented April 6, 1925. Mr. Morin Not printed, 

161. .\nnual Report of the Canadian National Railway System, for the year ended 

December 31, 1924. Presented April 14, 1925 Presented in printed jorm. 

162. Return to an Order of the House of February 19, 1925. for a Return showing: — 

1. The total cost of acquiring land, and of construction, at the Buffalo Park at 
Wainwright. Alberta. 2. The total cost to date of the Jasper Park. 3. The total 
cost to date of the Buffalo Park near Fort Smith. 4. The cost of admin.stration 
in each of the above parks. 5. The revenue derived from each of the above 
parks. 6. The cost of the Government buildings, fencing, etc., at Fort Smith. 
7. The amount of the contract entered into for the moving of Buffalo from 
Wainwright to the North Park. Presented April 15, 1925. Mr. Kellner. 

Not printed. 

163. Return to an Order of the House of Februarj- 25, 1925, for a Return showing:— 

1. The gross postal revenue derived from newspapers for the last two years of 
record. 2. The estimated expenditure for the same years, as far as can be arrived 
at, in so far as newspapers are concerned, and what bulk of the mail do newspapers 
make up. 3. The average daily weight of newspapers carried in the mails and the 
estimated deficit to the country in delivery of newspapers in the mails. Presented 
April 15, 1925. Mr. Church Not printed. 

164. Return to an Order of the House of March 9. 1925. for a copy of ail correspondence 

and other documents received by the Post Office Department during the year 
23 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME B— Continued 

1924, relatiag to the reopening of a post oflBce at Despres Road or Desprfes 
Village, Kent County, New Brunswick. Presented April 15, 1925. Mr. Doucet. 

Not printed. 

165. Return to an Order of the House of March 18, 1925, for a copy of Agreement between 

the Vancouver Harbour Comimissioners and the British Oriental Grain Company, 
relative to the acquisition of No. 3 elevator, Vancouver, British Columbia, together 
with copy of lease or other documents pertaining thereto; also, copy of corre- 
spondence between the Harbour Commissioners and said British Oriental Grain 
Company. Presented April 15, 1925. Hon. Mr. Stevens Not printed. 

166. Report of Messrs. George W. Kyte, M.P., J. Fred Johnston, M.P., and L. J. Papineau, 

M.P., Commissioners appointed bj' the Canadian Government to the British 
Empire Exhibition at Wembley, England, 19M. Presented April 15. 1925. 

Not printed. 

167. Return to an Order of the House of April 15. 1925, for a Return showing; — 1. By 

what firms or persons groceries and other provisions were supplied to Dorchester 
Penitentiary last year. 2. Whether tenders were called for these supplies. 3. The 
quantities and prices. Presented April 15, 1925. Hon. Mr. Baxter. .. .A'ot printed. 

168. Return to an Order of the House of March 25. 1925. for a Return showing: — 1. The 

total amount of money disbursed on account of Soldier Settlement, to) land 
settlement; (6) fishermen and others. 2. The total cost of Soldier Settlement 
each year, to date, including wages, travelling and all other e-vpenses. 3. The 
total amount each j-ear paid to the Board by the Soldier Settlers. 4. The 
amount of the total yearly payments due by said settlers. 5. The total amount 
outstanding, including interest, in this connection. Presented April 16, 1925. 
Mr. Gould Not printed. 

169. Supplementary Return to an Order of the House of March 5, 1923, for a return showing 

the various technical and professional officials appointed to the Civil Service of 
Canada during the years from September, 1911, to December, 1922, boih years 
inclusive, with a statement showing the salaries of each official, the qualification of 
each official and the method employed by the Civil Service Commission to select 
each said technical and professional official ; also a detailed statement naming the 
examiners in each case and the office to which the party selected was apiwinted. 
Presented April 16, 1925. Mr. Martell Not printed. 

170. Return to an Order of the House of March 2, 1925, for a return showing the cost 

when completed of the following public works, including in cases where the work 
is not completed estimated cost to finish: (1) Drj' Dock at Esquimalt. Victoria. 
(2) Post Office Building, Victoria; (3) Outer Wharf. Victoria; (4) Floating Dry 
Dock, Vancouver; (5) Elevators, Terminal Facilities, Wharves, and other 
Properties of the Vancouver Harbour Board; (6) Post Office, Vancouver; (7) 
Floating Dry Dock, Prince Rupert; (S) Government Wharves and Buildings, 
Prince Rupert. Presented April 16, 1925. Mr. Neill Not printed. 

171. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General, of April 1, 1925, 

for a copy of all correspondence between the New Brunswick Government or 
any member thereof and any Minister or Department of the Dominion Govern- 
ment, with reference to the taking over by the Dominion Government of the 
St. John and Quebec Railway, since the said railway was constructed. P.esented 
April 16, 1925. Mr. Doucet Not printed. 

172. Return to an Order of the House of March 30. 1925, for a Return showing the total 

cost of the Civil Service for the year ending March 31. 1924, in each of the 
following departments: — Agriculture, Public Archives. Auditor General. Civil 
Service Commission, Customs and Excise, External Affairs, Finance. Governor 
General's, Indian Affairs, Insurance, Interior, Justice, Labour. Marine and 
Fisheries, National Defence (Naval, Militia and Airl, Mines, Royal Canadian 
Mounted Police. Post Office. Privy Council, Public Works, Printing and Stationery, 
Railways and Canals, Secretary of State, Trade and Commerce, Immigration and 
Colonization. Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment. Patents and Copj-right, Soldier 
Settlement Board, and Health. Presented April 16, 1925. Mr. Garland (Bow 

River) Not printed. 

24 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

173. Return to an Order of the House of March 25, 1925, for a Return showing: — 1. The 

official individual name of each of the last fourteen commissions appointed to 
look into the grain trade. 2. In what years the various commissions were appointed. 
3. The cost of each of the said commissions. Presented April 16, 1925. Mr. Gould. 

Not printed. 

174. Return to an Order of the House of Miiroli 2, 1925, for a Return showing the total 

revenues of the Government collected from Toronto during the past three years 
of record from, (a) Customs and Inland Revenue; (b) Post Office; (c) Income 
and Sales Tax; and (d) other sources. Presented April 16, 1925. Mr. Church. 

A'ot printed. 

175. Return to an order of the House of March 23, 1925, for a return showing the total 

income from gold claims in the area known as the Pas Mineral Belt, for the 
years 1922, 1923 and 1924. the income for the same years from the following 
sources: entry fees, in lieu of development work, renewals, surveyin^g, rentals, 
royalties; also total amount expended by the Department of Mines during the 
above years for development and administration of the said area. Presented 
April 16, 1925. Mr. Bird \ot printed. 

176. Return to an Address to His ELxcellency the Governor General, of March 9, 1925, for 

copy of all letters, telegrams, documents and correspondence, bet.ween January 
1, 1922, and February 25, 1924, between R. H. Gale and any minister or official of 
the Dominion Government: and, between R. H. Gale and the Vancouver Harbour 
Commission, and between Vancouver Harbour Commissioners and any minister or 
official of the Dominion Government ; and. between any representative of the 
Spillers interests and the Harbour Commiiisioners. and, or any minister of the 
Crown and official of the Government, regarding the negotiations for lease or 
sale of certain waterfront property in the Vancouver Harbour, upon which is now 
erected what is known as the Sp:l!ers elevator, and which property lies immedi- 
ately east of the Vancouver Harbour Commissioners elevator No. 1. Also, copy 
of anj' letters, agreements, schedules of fees, assiemnents. transfers, and other 
documents appertaining thereto. Presented April 20, 1925. Mr. Black (Yukon). 

Not printed. 

177. Return to an Order of the House of March 9, 1925. for a copy of all correspondence 

and other documents received by the Post Office Department, relating to the 
dismissal of Mrs. Pierre F. Boudreau, as postmistress of Inkerman, Gloucester 
County, New Brunswick, and the appointment of the present postmaster. 
Presented April 20, 1925. Mr. Doucet Not printed. 

178. Return to an Order of the House of March 11, 1925. for a copy of all correspondence 

between the Gold Commissioner of the Yukon, the Surveyor General, the 
Director General of Surveys, any official of the Government and any person con- 
cerning the survey and plan of the townsite of Keno City, in the Yukon Territory. 
Presented April 20, 1925. Mr. Black (Yukon) Not printed. 

179. Return to an Order of the House of April 1, 1925, for a copy of all correspondence, 

letters, telegrams and communications passed between the Honourable Member 
for Skeena, and any Minister or official of the Government, in relation to 
the "Halibut Treaty" with the United States; also, all letters, telegrams and 
communications of whatsoever kind, passed between the said Honourable Member 
for Skeena and any Minister or official of tihe Government relating to the " close 
season for Halibut on the Pacific"; also, all petitions, letters and communications 
from other persons forwarded by the said Honourable Member for Skeena, to any 
Minister or official of the Government, relating to the said " Halibut Treaty " or 
the "Close Season for Halibut.' Presented April 20, 1925. Mr. Black (Yukon). 

Not printed. 

180. Return to an Order of the House of .4pril 6. 1925. for a return giving a list of 

the 200 odd industries referred to by the Minister of the Interior in his speech at 
page 174S of Hansard. 1925. as having been established along the line of the 
Canadian National Railway from Fort William eastward and the location of each. 
Presented April 20, 1925. Sir Henn,- Drayton Not printed. 

25 



15-lG George \' List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

181. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated March IS, 1925, showing: — What is the 

number of steamsh:ps that cleared for poits outside of Canada during 1924 — (a) 
with cargo alone; (6) with passengers alone; (c) with cargo and passengtrs, from 
Montreal, Quebec, Vancouver, Halifax and St. Jolm, respectively, ricjfutcd 
April 21, 1925. Hon, Mr. Tanner Not printed. 

182. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated MarcJi 7, 1925, showing: — 1. On what dates 

during 1923 and 1924 did the Chief Inspector of Customs and Excise Department 
visit the cities of Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, Quebec and Vancouver, respect- 
ively, for inspectorial purposes. 2. On wh;U dates, during 1923 aud 1924. did any 
assiiNtant inspector from the Chief Inspector's office at Ottawa, visit the said cities 
respectively for inspectorial purposes. 3. Who were the assistant inspectors who 
made the visits. Presented April 21, 1925. Hon. Mr. Tanner Not printed. 

183. Return to an .\ddress to His Excellency the Governor General, of February 19, 1925, 

for returns showing: — 1. The amount spent by the Government of Canada in 
relieving unemployment in Canada in Winnipeg, Hamilton, Toronto, Vancouver 
and Montreil during the past six years. 2. Whether the Government during these 
years had any agreement with the provinces and mimicipalifics as to any form of 
relipf; if so, what the arrangement was. 3. Whether any steps have been token 
during this winter by the Government alone or with the provinces or municipalities 
to take care of unemplojTnent, and to regulate and prevent the dumping of those 
out of work in the larger centres of population. Presented April 22, 1925. Mr. 
Church Not printed. 

183a. Return to an Order of the House of March 2, 1925, for a Return .«ho\ving: — 1. 
Whether any report was received by the Government from any mayors or muni- 
cipal authorities in Western Ontario to meet the Government regarding the relief 
of unemployment, or any other application received for unemployment relief and 
from whom. 2. Correspondence held with the municipal authorities aforfs:i!<l. and 
replies sent by the Government. 3. Whether the Government declined to meet 
them. 4. If so. why, and whether they were notified not to come to Ottawa, and 
by whom. 5. Whether the Government will afford the House an opportunity at an 
early date of discu^ing the whole subject of unemployment in Canada. 6. If so, 
when. Presented April 22, 1925. Mr. Church Not printed. 

1836. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General, of Febniary 19, 
1925, for a copy of all papers, agreements, correspondence, letters and other data 
exchanged between the Government of Cunada and municipalities or provinces, 
relating to unemplojTnent. including a return as to what action was taken at 
conferences between the aforesaid governments on this question, and showing the 
amount spent on unemployment by the Government of Canada during the past 
four years for unemployment relief. Presented April 22, 1925. Mr. Ohurch. 

Not printed. 

184. Return to an Order of the House of March 30, 1925, for a Return showing: — 

1. Number of non-residents of Toronto appointed to positions in the employ of the 
Government in Toronto during each of the jxist three years in the various govern- 
ment <lepartmcnts. 2. By whom these appointments were made. Presented April 
22. 1925. Mr. Church Not printed. 

185. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated April 21, 1925. showing: — ^Hcnv much money 

has been paid from 1911 to 1924, inclusive, for printing, advertisements and annual 
subscriptions each year, respectively, to the Montreal Gazette. Presented April 
22, 1925. Hon. Mr. Roche Not printed. 

186. Report on Civil .\viation, including Civil 0(>erations for other Government Depart- 

ments, undertaken by the Royal C.inadian Air Force for the year 1924. (Depart- 
ment of National Defence). Presented April 30, 1925 Presented in printed jorm. 

187. Return to an Order of the House of .\pril 8, 1925, for a copy of instmctions 

given to Dr. Hume and Mr. RiLSsell in connection with their visit to the County 
of Lambton, and their investigations into the Production of Crude Petroleum in 
that county, and all letters or reports written or made by them or either of 
them thereon, and all correspondence relating thereto. Presented April 23. 1925. 

Mr. Lcsueur Not printed. 

26 



15-lG George V List of Sesfioniil Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

188. Return to an Order of the House of March 16, 1925. for a copy of all corre- 

spondence passing betwen Quobec Harbour Commissioners and any Minister, or 
department, or official of any department O'f the Government during the year 1924, 
in reference to advances by the Dominion Government from votes by Parliament; 
also, a copy of the report of the Board of Audit in regard to the affaire of the 
Quebec Harbour Commissioners made during the year 1924; also, a copy of a 
report of any individual member of the Board of Audit made in addition to the 
report of the Board. Presented April 23. 1925. Hon. Mr. Stevens. Not printed. 

189. Return to an Order of the House of March 2, 1925, for a Return showing: — 

1. How many soldier settlers in Manitoba were granted loans prior to December 
31, 1924. 2. How many of these abandoned their farms prior to December 31, 

1924. 3. How m.my of the farms abandoned in Manitoba were resold. 4. Average 
net loss on the farms in Manitob-i thus resold, not including interest, taxes, cost 
of sales, etc. 5. How many soldier settlers still on their farms in Manitoba were 
in arrears with iwyments on December 31, 1924, and to what extent. 6. On how 
many abandoned farms in Manitoba has no salvage sale of stocks and equipment 
yet been held. Presented April 23, 1925. Mr. Bancroft Not printed. 

190. Sixth .\nnual Report of the Board of Directors of Canadian Government Merchant 

Marine, Limited, for the year ended December 31, 1924. Presented April 23, 
1925 Presented in printed jorm. 

191. Correspondence between the Government of Canada and the Government of the 

United States from April 29, 1924, to March 19, 1925, in regard to the St. 
Lawrence Waterway Project. Presented April 23, 1925 Not printed. 

191o. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of April 27, 1925, for 
a copy of all correspondence of whatever nature it may be, exchanged between the 
Government of Canada and that of the United States or between any officials of 
said governments, either through the Departments or Commissioners from June 1, 
1921, up to this present date, in connection with the St. Lawrence Waterway 
Scheme, the diversion of the waters of Lake Michigan for th« Chicago Drainage 
Canal and the diversion of the waters of Niagara Falls. Presented May 14, 1925. 
Mr. Archambault Not printed. 

192. Return to an Order of the House of April 8. 1923, for a copy of all papers, reports, 

writings, telegrams and other documents written by Dr. Peter McGibbon in the 
year 1921 to the Canadian Government Merchant Marine, Limited, or to any of 
the officials of the then Government mentioned in a letter dated, Bracobridge, 
October 6, 1921, and addressed to the Hon. J. H. Stewart, Minister of Railways, 
a copy of which was tabled some time ago; also a copy of all answers to such 
letters, telegrams, etc., forwarded to Dr. Peter McGibbon. Presented April 24, 

1925. Mr. Hammell Not printed. 

193. Return to an Order of the House of June 16, 1924, for a Return showing the total 

number of permanent civil servants employed in the various public sen-ices of 
Canadn. exclusive of railway employees, during each of the years; 1917, 1918, 
1919. 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923. 2. Totaf amount paid to said employees durinc each 
of the above years. Presented April 27. 1925. Mr. Benoit Not printed. 

194. Return to an Order of the House of March 30, 1925, for a return showing, in detail, 

"Contra accounts against the Dominion Government for services rendered" by 
the Quebec Board of Harbour Commissioners, and referred to in answer to 
questions on page 1317 of Hansard. Presented April 27, 1925. Hon. Mr. Stevens. 

Not printed. 

193. Return to an Order of the House of April 27, 1925, for a Return showing: — 1. Amount 
of insurance carried on property in Vancouver: (n) In the name of the Dominion 
Government; (6) In the name of Vancouver Harbour Commi.ssioners; (r) In the 
name of the Board of Grain CommissinneT.-^. ?. Total premium paid on said 
insurance for each of the years during 1922. 1923. 1934. 3. To whom the .«aid 
insurance was eiven and the aeents of the companies with whom said insurance 

was placed. Presented April 27, 1925. Hon. Mr. Stevens Not printed. 

27 



15-16 George V List of Sess-ional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

196. Partial Return to an Order of the House of February 16, 1925, for a return 

showing number of employees in the several departments in the public service 

for the fiscal year ending March 31, 19'J4, designated in accordance with the 
new classification schedules, and showing salary paid in each case. Presented 
April 29, 1925. Mr. Sutherland .\ol printed. 

197. Return to an Order of the House of March 16, 1925, for a copy of all correspondence, 

documents, and other communications regarding the leasing of certain property 
in the lower French Indian Reserve to one V. Grenon, and also relating to any 
comiplaints or requests for cancellation of the said lease. Presented May 1, 
1925. Mr. Arthurs Not printed. 

198. Return to an Order of the House of March 9, 1925, for a copy of all corre- 

spondence, vouchers, pay-Hsts. and other documents, in connection with repairs 
etTected to the piers at Grand Etang, Inverness County, Nova Scotia, during the 
fiscal years 1922-23 and 1923-24. Presented May 1, 1925. Mr. Black (Halxjax). 

Not printea. 

199. Return to an Order of the House of March 25, 1925, for a copy of each and 

every report made by insj^ectors of work at Vancouver, British Columbia, 
representing the Dominion Government, or the Vancouver Harbour Commission, 
on (a) No. 1 elevator extension; (6) No. 1 elevator jetty and supcrstnicture; (c) 
No. 2 elevator; (d) No. 3 elevator extension and jetty. Pre.-^pntcd Maj' 1, 1925. 
Hon. Mr. Stevens Not printed. 

200. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated March 12, 1925, to include: — Copies 

of all correspondence, statutory declarations, statements and other documents in 
the possession of the Department of Customs and Excise relating to the seizure 
of intoxicating liquors at the premises of Lambert Matthews of Edwardsville, 
Cape Breton County, N.S., in December, 1924. Presented May 5, 1925. Hon. Mr. 
Tanner Not printed. 

201. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated March 12, 1925, to include: — Copies 

of all correspondence, statutory declarations, statements and other documents in 
the possession of the Dejpartment of Customs and Excise relatimj to the seizure 
in December, 1924, of intoxicating liquors claimed by Neil M. MacDonald, hotel 
keeper of Reserv'e Mines, County of Cape Breton, N.S. Presented May 5. 1925. 
Hon. Mr. Tanner Not printed. 

202. Return to an Order of the House of March 16, 1925, for a copy of all documents, 

contracts, estimates, pay sheets, vouchers, correspondence and other papers relating: 
(a) To the acquisition of a site for the Dartmouth Pier, Nova Scotia, constructed 
since 1921. and {61 To construction of said pier and the approaches thereto. 
Presented May 7, 1925. Mr. Black (Ilalijax) Not printed. 

203. Return to an Order of the House of March 9, 1925. for a copy of all correspondence 

and other documents received by the Post Office Department since January 1. 
1924, with reference to giving a direct mail ser\'ice between Adamsville and 
Bcersville, in the county of Kent, New Brunswick. Presented May 11. 1925. Mr. 
Doucet Not printed. 

204. Return to an Order of the House of May 4, 1925. for a Return showing: — 

1. Whether the Dominion Government owns a block of territorj- in British 
Columbia known as the Peace River Block. If so, the total area. 2. What 
consider.itions were given to British Columbia in return for the surrender of the 
said area to the Dominion Government. 3. Whether any of the land in the said 
Peace River Block within the boundaries of the Province of Bri(i.=h Columbia 
has been sold or leased If so. (n) hcysv much; (b) in how many separate parcels; 
(••) the total amount received from the sale price of the property or in return 
for lease, or in rentals, if leased. Presented May 11, 1925. Hon. Mr. .Stevens. 

Not printed. 

203. Return to an Order of the House of April 20. 1925. for a Return showing: — 
1. How many coal leases have been granted in the Drumheller. Rosedale and 
Wayne fields. 2. The total area of each original lease. 3. To whom these leases 
were granted. 4. Hijw many of these leases have been subsequently subleased. 
5. The area of each section subleased. 6. The present lessee. 7. The amount of 

28 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papiers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

arrears of rentals or royalties at the time of abandonment of the original leases 
or of subleasing. 8. How many of the abandoned leases have been again leased. 
Presented May 11, 1925. Mr. Garland (Bow River) Not printed. 

206. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of April 27, 1925, 

for a copy of all correspondence and other documents passing betwoen the executive 
officers of the Canadian National Railways and the Temiskaming and Xorthern 
Ontario Railway Commission or any of its officers, and between the Canadian 
^National Railways and the Government of Canada or any of the Ministers 
thereof, and between anj' of the abovementioned and the Government of the 
Province of Quebec or any of the Ministers or officials thereof, regarding the 
proposed extension of the Temiskaming and Xorthern Ontario Railway subsidiary 
(the Xipissing Central) into Rouyn. Presented May 14, 1925. Mr. McQiiarrie. 

A'o4 printed. 

206a. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated June 17, 1925, showing:— Oopias of all 
correspondence relating to the construction or obstruction of the Nipissing rail- 
way in the province of Quebec. Presented June 22, 1925. Hon. Mr. Gordon. 

Not printed. 

2066. Order in Council, P.C. 913, dated June 11, 1925. with reference to an application 
of the Nipissing Central Railway. Presented (Senate) June 26, 1925.. .A'oi printed. 

207. Return to an Order of the House of March 30. 1925, for a copy of all correspondence 

and other papers relating to change of the post office at Big Beach, Cape Breton 
County, Nova Scotia. Presented May 14, 1925. Mr. Jones Not printed. 

208. Return to an Order of the House of March 16. 1925, for a copy of all correspondence, 

cables, telegrams, and other negotiations which may have taken place during the 
years 1923 and 1924 and 1925, between the Minister of Railw.ays and Canals and/ 
or his Department, and/or any other Member of the Government and any 
individual, firms or companies wherever situated, relating to the purchase or sale 
of the Canadian Government Merchant 'Marine steamers, as a whole, or for any 
part thereof. Presented May 15, 1925. Mr. Black (Halifax) Not Printed. 

209. Correspondence in regard to the trade agreement with Finland. Presented May 18, 

1925 Not printed. 

210. Statement of principal imports from Netherlands and colonies to Canada, during the 

fiscal year ended March, 1925. Presented May 18, 1925 Not printed. 

211. Return to an Order of the House of April 1, 1925, for a copy of all correspondence 

exchanged between the Postmaster General, the Civil Service Commission and all 
other pcr.^ons, relative to the appointment of a postmaster at Glace Bay, Xova 
Scotia. Presented May 18, 1925. Mr. Black (Halifax) Not printed. 

212. Return to an Order of the House of May 6, 1925, for a copy of a report made during 

the year 1924, by M. H. McLeod, Chief Consulting Engineer of the Canadian 
National Railways, regarding the possibilitv of operating street cars over the 
Victoria Bridge, Montreal. Presented May 19, 1925. Hon. Mr. Stevens. 

Not printed. 

213. Return to an Order of the House of May 11, 1925, for a return showing the maximum 

grades between engine runs from, (a) Calgary to Vancouver on the Canadian 
Pacific Railway; (b) Edmonton to Vancouver on the Canadian National Railways; 
(c) Fort William to North Bay on the Canadian Pacific Railway; (d) Superior 
Junction to Cochrane on the Canadian National Railways; (e) North Bay to 
Montreal on the Canadian Pacific Railway; (/) Cochrane to Quebec on the 
Canadian National Railways; (g) Farnham to Mc.\dam Junction on the Canadian 
Pacific Railwav; ard (/i) Levis to McGi\-ney Junction. New Bnm.swick. on the 
Canadian National Railways. Pre^nted May 19. 1925. 'Mr. Morin..A^o< printed. 

214. Return to an Order of the House of May 13, 1925, for a copy of the report of 

Colonel Machin to Governor in Council respecting the Quebec riots of 1917. 

Presented May 22, 1925. Mr. Doucet Not printed. 

29 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

2l4a. Return to an Order of the House of June 10. 1926, for a copy of the report mide 
by Lieutenant-Colonel H. A. Machin to the Honourable the Minister of Justice 
with regard to the Quebec disturbances in the early part of April, 1918. Presented 
June 15, 1925. Mr. Doucet Not printed. 

215. Copy of correspondence between the Honourable E. J. MoMurray, MJ*. and the 

Prime Minister, concerning the former's resignation as Solicitor General of 
Canada. Presented May 22, 1925 Xol printed. 

216. Return to an Order of the House of April 27. 1925. for a Return showing: — 1. Names 

of the doctors who were ofGcially appointed as medical advisers to the employees 
of the Canadian National Railways, at Riviere du Loup, from 1900 to date. 

2. From and to what date each of them performed these duties. 3. On whose 
recommendation each of them was appointed. 4. Whether such a post entitles 
the holder to a pass on the Canadian National Railways. Presented May 25, 1925. 
■Mr. Pouliot Not printed. 

217. Copy of Interim Report oi Imperial Shipping Committee on Canadian Marine 

Insurance Rates. Presented May 25, 1925 Presented in printed form. 

218. Supplementary Return to an Order of the House of May 19, 1924, for a copy of 

all correspondence, telegrams, leases or other documents exchanged between the 
Government or any member thereof, and any other parlies in any way relating 
to a leise which has recenitly been given on Peigan Indian Reser\'es to the Hon. 
Mr. McLean. Presented May 26, 1925. Mr. Coote Not printed. 

219. Return to an Order of the House of April 22, 1925, for a Return showing: — 

1. Whether the Government acquired by purchase or otherwise since 1921, a wharf 
property at Lockeport, Nova Scotia. 2. When it was acquired and from whom. 

3. The price of the property. 4. Whether any repairs or additions have been 
made to the property since it was acquired. 5. If so, when the same were made, 
and the cost thereof. And also Return to an Order of the House of April 22. 
1925, for a copy of all reports, estimates, statements, specifications, offers, accounts, 
vouchers, correspondence and other papers relating to the Government wharf at 
Lookeport, Nova Scotia, and repairs and additions thereto since the year 1921. 
Presented May 27, 1925. 'Mr. Jones Not printed. 

220. Return to an Order of the House of April 27, 1925, for a copy of all correspondence 

and other documents received by the Post Office Department relating to the 
dismissal of Albert E. Robichaud, as postmaster of Lamcque, Gloucester County, 
New Brunswick, together with a copy of the evidence taken at the inquiry, the 
report of the investigator and all correspondence relating to the appointment of 
the new postmaster. Presented May 27, 1925. Mr. Doucet Not printed. 

221. Return to an Order of the House of April 27, 1925, for a copy of all correspondence , 

and other documents in connection with the appointment of the new postmaster at 
St. Ignace, electoral district of Kent, New Brunswick. Presented May 27, 1925. 
Mr. Doucet Not printed. 

222. Return to an Order of the House of April 20, 1925, for a copy of all correspondence 

and communications between the Government, any member or official of the 
Government, and any persons, during the past three years, concerning the dispos.:l 
of the Government property situate on the southwest corner of Granville and 
Pender Streets, Vancouver, known as the old post office property. Presented 
May 27, 1925. Mr. Black (.Yukon) Not printed. 

222a. Return to an Order of the House of June 8, 1925, for a copy of all correspondence, 
letters, telegrams, options, agreements, and other documents, regarding the purchase 
of the Winch Building. Vancouver. British Columbia. .Also a copy of tenders 
or letters offering to purchase the old post office building and site on the comer 
of Pender and Granville streets, Vancouver. Presented June 19. 1925. Sir Henry 

Drayton Not printed. 

30 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

223. Return to an Order of the House of the 18th iMay, 1925, for a Return showing: — 

1. How much Federal money has been expended by the National or Quebec 
Battlefields Commission in monuments and historic sites in Quebec. 2. How 
much Federal money has been expended for like purposes in the Maritime 
Provinces. 3. What monuments have been erected in the Maritime Provinces, 
and their respootive costs. 4. Whether the character, design .'ind inscriptions of 
these monuments were ever submitted to any Government, historical authority, 
or historical society, previous to erection and, if so, did they meet their com- 
mendation. Presented May 28, 192,). Mr. Black (Halifax) Not prinled. 

224. Return to an Order of the House of April 27, 1925. for a Return showing number 

of civil servants who are eliffible to come under the provisions of the Civil Service 
i^uperannualion Act, 1924. Presented May 29. 192o. Mr. McQuarrie. .A'ot printed. 

225. Return showing number of clerks, both permanent and temporary, with their .salaries, 

employed in the Department of External Affairs, 1921-1922 ami 1925-1926. 
Presented June 5, 1925 Not printed. 

226. Copy of Order in Council, P.C. 886, dated June 5, 1925. respecting Freight Rates. 

Presented June 8. 1925 Printed jar distribution to Senator.^ and Members. 

227. Return ^o an Order of the Senate, dated April 28, 1925, for the production of a 

comparative statement of the Importation from England and the United States, 
of shoes, or iron, steel, and woollen manufactured goods, during the last three 
years ending April 1, 1925. Presented June 9. 1925. Hon. Mr. David. .A'of printed. 

228. Return to an Order of the House of May 11, 1925, for a return showing statement 

made out by Messrs. Wilson and Wilson, in October, 1924. as auditors for Van- 
couver Harbour Commissioners, covering the operation of \o. 1 elevator, for 
crop year ending July 31, 1924. Presented June 11, 1925. Hon. Mr. Stevens. 

Nol printed. 

229. Copy of Interim Report of the Registrar of the Combines Investigation Act, 1923, 

of his investigation int<5 an alleged combine operating to limit competition in 
connection with the marketing of the New Brunswick potato crop, dated June 
9, 1925. Presented June 11, 1925 Presented in prinled form. 

230. Return to ;in Order of the House of May 25, 1925, for a Return showing: 1. Number 

of translators employed by the Senate and House of Commons, respectively. 

2. Number of translators employed by the public departments in Ottawa, or 
branches of the Government Service. 3. Duties of the Blue Book translation 
staff of the House of Commons. 4. Whether the Blue Book translation staff has 
been relieved of the duty of translating the annual departmental reports. 5. If 
so, why and upon whose authority. Presented June 12, 1925. Mr. Hocken. 

Not printed. 

231. Return to an Order of the House of April 27, 1925. for a copy of all correspondence, 

lettere, telegrams, and communications passed between the Government, any 
member or official of the Government, and any persons crmceming the establish- 
ment of Drumheller as a Customs Excise Outport, and Warehouse Port, under 
the survey of the Port of Calgary, Alta. Presented June 12, 1925. Mr. Garland 
(Bow River) Not printed. 

232. Return to an Order cf the House of March 11, 1925. for a Return showing: 1. Name, 

rank, position, and pension of each officer on the Staff at Headquarters, Ottawa, 
and the Militar\' Districts, who has been retired from the service, from Janu.ary 
1, 1924. to March 1, 1925. 2. Name, rank, position, and salary, including pay and 
all allowances, of each officer of the Staff at Headquarters, Ottawa, and the 
Military Districts, who has received: (a) an extension of term; (6) a reappoint- 
ment, from .I.anuary 1. 1924. to March 1, 1925. 3 Who recommended to the 
Minister and the Deputy Minist<>r of the Department of National Defence: 
(a) the retirement of an officer; (b) the extension of terra to an officer; (c) a 
re.Tppointment of an officer; (d) the promotion of an officer. 4. Name of each 
officer of the Staff at the General Headquart^-rs and Local Headquarters. Ottawa, 
and in the Military Districts, who has held the same r-onk more than four years, 
and the tenure of .appointment of all positions on the Staff. 5. The intention of 

31 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

the Minister of the Department of National Defence regarding those oflBcers who 
have not been promoted in the army for many years. Presented June 15, 1925. 
Mr. Doucet Not printed. 

233. Return to an Order of the Hor.se of March 11, 1925, for a Return showing: 1. 

Tenure of appointment of an officer commanding a Military District. 2. Names 
of the officers commanding the Military' Districts of Halifax. Nova Scotia; St. 
John, New Bruns^vick; Toronto, Ontario; Montreal, Quebec; Quebec. Quebec; 
from August 1, 1912, to March 1, 1925. 3. During the above yeara, (a) the date 
of the first appointment as officer commanding a Militar>' District of each of the 
above officers; (6) the d:ite of each reappointment; (c) the date oi each exten- 
sion of term; id) the total number of years of service as officer commanding a 
Military District. 4. Whether it is the intention of the Minister and the Depart- 
ment of National Defence to maintain in his position an officer commanding a 
Militan.' District for a term of more than four or five years, by this faot stopping 
promotion to a iot of officers of the Permanent Force well qualified and available 
for such a position. Presented June 15, 1925. Mr. Doucet Not printed. 

234. Return to an Order of the House of June 11, 1925, for a Return showing: 1. Whether 

any June or other training camps are being held for the Militia. 2. If so. where 
and for what units and length of time. 3. What will be done this year for artilier>- 
units as to training. Presented June 15, 1925. Mr. Church Not printed. 

235. Rcii;ni to an Order of the House of June 1, 1925, for a copy of the lease made by 

ihc ho'ding company of the Scribe Hotel property in Paris purchased by the 
Canadian National Railway System, and any other papers and documents in 
any way relating to the said lease of the said property or the title thereof. 
Presented June 15, 1925. Sir Henrj- Drayton Not printed. 

236. Return to an Order of the House of March 4, 1925. for a Return showing: 1. Total 

cost of the investigation lately conducted by David Campbell. K.C.. of Winni- 
peg, into the supplies of coal and other matters affecting Militarj- District No. 
10. 2. Whether any suspensions of Militia Officers have been made as result 
and if so what officers have been suspended, if any. 3. Whether such militia 
officers, if so suspended, were given the opportunity to conduct their defence with 
the assistance of coun.«el. 4. Whether such militia officers so suspended, if .any, 
were accorded the right of an officer to court martial. 5. In each case of an 
officer so suspended, if any, the reason, and how long the suspension lasted. 
6. Whether any such officer so suspended is drawnig his regular military pay 
while under suspension. 7. Fees paid each counsel for the Government in the 
matter or for the Commission. Presented June 16. 1925. Mr. Ross (Kingston). 

Not printed. 

236a. Return to an Order of the House of March 4, 1925, for a Return showing: 1. Total 
cost of the Commission .oppointed by the Government regarding the coal enquiry 
at Tuxedo Barracks, Winnipeg. 2. What amount the Commissioners received. 
3. Whether the Government received any objection .as to the amount paid from 
Winnipeg or elsewhere. Presented June 16, 1925 Mr. Arthurs. .. .A'ot printed. 

236b. Return to an Order of the House of March 2, 1925, for a copy of all accounts sent in 
to the Government for pa>-ment for services rendered by Commissioner David 
Campbell, K.C., and D. R. MacLe.an, Government Counsel, during the enquirj- 
into coal supplied at Tuxedo Barracks, Winnipeg, together with a ropy of nil 
correspondence passing between the Solicitor General, or any other official of the 
Government or any department thereof, and Messrs. Campbell and MaoT^ean. 
or any other person or persons, in connection with said accounts. Presented 
June 20, 1925. Mr. Arthurs Not printed. 

236c. Return to an .'Address to His Excellency the Governor Genera] of March 2. 1925, 
for a copy of all telegrams, letters. Orders in Council, evidence and report or 
reports, and other documents in connection with the investigsition lately conducted 
b>' David Campbell. K.C., of Winnipeg, into the supplies of coal and other matters 
affecting Military District 10, and especially copies of telegrams passine between 
the Solicitor General and the said Commissioner or Counsel for the Commission 
and between the Defence Department and the Commissioner or Counsel for the 

Commission. Mr. Ross (Kingston) A'ot printed. 

32 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5~Continued 

Also. — Return to an Order of the Iloiif^e of March 30, 1925, for a copy of 
correspontlence passinp between the Department of National Defence or the 
Department of .Justice and the Canadian Coal Sales Company, Limited, in the 
years 1934 ami 193o, and also, for a copy of all charges made, in relation to the 
sale of coal or otherwise, affecting militia officers at Winnipeg in the said years 
•n-itih the name of the party making such charges, and also, for a copy of the 
reports of General Ketchen, with respect to said charges. Hon. Mr. Stevens. 
Presented June 22, 1925 Not printed. 

237. Return to an Order of the House of June 10, 1925, for a Return showing; — 1. Amounts 

paid, per year by the Government of Canada to the Honourable E. N. Rhodes, 
during the years 1919-1920, 1920-1921. and 1921-1922. 2. Amounts paid during 
these years for cab hire for Mr. Rhodes. Presented June 16, 1925. Mr. 
Carruthers Not printed. 

238. Copy of Report on Problems relating to Grading of Grain; Copy of Report of 

Dominion (irain Research Laboratory, dated .4u£niat 9. 1924; Memoranda pre- 
pared by Dr. Robert Newton, and Dr. G. S. Whitby, regarding the report of the 
Dominion Grain Research Laboratory. Presented June 17, 1925 Not printed. 

239. Return to an Order of the House of June 1, 1925, for a return showing the cost to 

the Government of all leather goods used by the Medical Branch of the Soldiers' 
Oivil-Re-estaiblishment in Edmonton, Alberta. Pr&?ented June 17, 1925. Mr. 
Kellner Not printed. 

240. Return to an Order of the House of March 30, 1925, for a Return showing; — 1. The 

annual cost of the Soldier Settlement Board since its inception: (o) amount 
spent on rent of offices, and where the offices are located; (b) amount spent on 
salaries; (c) how much the head office in each province cost; id) amount 
expended in other ways, as overhead. 2. Number of farms purchased under the 
Soldier Settlement Board: (o) by provinces: (6) amount pa'd per farm; (c) the 
area of each farm in acres. 3. Number of farms occupied under the Board, by 
provinces. 4. The total amount loaned to settlers; (a) amount of such loans 
expended in permanent improvements; (6) amount of such loans expended in 
purchasing live stock; (c) amounts loaned by provinces; (rf) rate of interest 
charged; (e) the nature of the securities on which loans were made; (/) the 
currency of these loans; (g) who holds the mortgages. 5. Number of farms, by 
provinces, which have been retained, ami the present economic condition of these 
farms. 6. Number of farms, by provinces, vacated; (a) what was done with 
suoh farms; (6) what happened to the loans made on such farms. 7. Whether 
all such settlers were required to carr>- all overhead of both purchase and 
equipment loans. 8. If not. what percentage they were supposed to carr>'. and 
■who carried the rest. 9. Who determined what adv.ance should be made to 
settlers under the Board. Presented June 17, 1925. Mr. Irvine A^o( printed. 

241. Return to an Order of the House of May 6. 1925. for a copy of all correspondence 

passing to and from the Department of Public Works relating to the wharf at 
Matane. including copies of contracts, if any. or other documents or agreements 
relating to siich wharf. Presented June 17, 1925. Mr. Hanson Not printed. 

242. Return to an Order of the House of May 25. 1925, for a copy of all specifications 

and contracts made regarding the new Halifax elevator. Presented June 18. 
192.S. Mr, Black {Halifax) Not printed. 

243. Return to an Order of the House of April 22. 1925. for a Return showing: — 1. The 

total amount spent by the present Govemnient since coming into office for 
public printing, aside from that done by the Printing Bureau. 2. The names of 
the firms or individuals awarded this printing, what amount of work was done 
by each, and at wha.t )>rice each year since the coming into power of the present 
Government. Presented June IS. 1925. Mr. Sutherland Not printed. 

244. Return to an Order of the House of February 23, 192.5. for a Return showing;—!. On 

what date and by n4>at authority the I>oirrinion of Canada acquired the North- 
west Territories and Rupert's Land, and at what cost to the Dominion of Canauda 
33 

7734—3 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

as a ■whole. 2. The total cost to the DomiDion of Canada as a whole in 
administering and developing said Northwest Territories and Rupert's Land. 
3. What portion of the Northwest Territories and Rupert's Land is still owned 
by the Dominion of Canada. 4. What portion of the Northwest Territories 
retained by the Dominion of Canada lies within the confines of each of the 
provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Albertii. 5. The total cost to the 
Dominion of Canada of administering and developing the last-mentioned areas. 

6. What portion of the lands referred to in paragraph four have been sold or 
otherwise disposed of since s;ime were acquired by the Dominion of Canada. 

7. Tihe proceeds from (a) sales of said lands mentioned in paragraph four; and 
(6) revenue derived thereon from all sources. Presented June 19, 1925. Mr. 
Clark .Not printed. 

245. Return to an Order of the House of June 10, 1925, for a Return showing: — 1. W'hether 

L. A. Forsythe, or Jajnes M. Davison, his partner, received legal work from any 
Department of tlio Government since January 1, 1922. 2. if so, the items, dates, 
and accounts for the moneys so paid to Mr. Forsythe or Mr. James M. Davison, 
his partner. 3. ^^ hat amount, if any, is still owing them. 4. Whether they are 
at present in receipt of legal work from the Government. Presented June 19, 
1925. Mr. Black (.Halijax) Not printed. 

246. Return to an Order of the House of February 23, 1925, for a Return showing: — 1. 

Since Confederation, how many acres of land belonging to the Dominion of 
Canada have been transferred to the Province of Ontario, and on what date 
transfers were made. 2. Consideration paid by said Province of Ontario for said 
transfers. 3. Cost to the Dominion of Canada of administering and developing 
said lands prior to the date of transfer. 4. Since Confederation, how many acres 
of land, belonging to the Domimon of Canada, have been transferred to the 
Province of Quebec, and on what date transfers were made. 5. Consideration 
paid by said Province of Quebec for said transfers. 6. Cost to the Dominion of 
Canada of administering and de\eioping said lands prior to the date of transfer. 
7. Whether the rights of the other provinces of Canada to compensation were 
reser\'ed when the boundaries of Ontario and Quebec were extended. Presented 
June 19, 1925. Mr. Clark Not printed. 

247. Return to an Address to His Excellency Uie Governor General of May IS, 1925, for 

a copy of all letters, telegrams, memoranda, orders in council, and other docu- 
ments in the possession of or uniier the control of the Government of Canada 
or any department thereof, of date subsequent to May 17, 1924, relating to the 
proposed reclamation of the area in the Pro\ince of British Columbia and the 
State of Idaho, known as the Kootenay Flats. Presented June 19, 1925. Mr. 
Humphrey Not printed. 

248. Return to an Order of the House of May 11, 1925, for a Return showing: — 1. Number 

of grain elevators owned or operated, (a) by Dominion Government; (6) by 
Harbour Commissioners under control of the Minister of Marine; (c) by the 
Canadian National Railways; (d) or sublet from any of the above. 2. Location of 
eaoh elevator, type of constraction, and the storage capacity of each. 3. Cost of 
each, exclusive of site. 4. Cost of each, including site. 5. Number and kind of 
separator, cleaner and dryer in each. 6. Capacity and kind of conveyor system 
in each elevator, including the number of legs. 7. By what kind of power each is 
operated, showing maximum demand and connected load of each plant. 8. Amount 
of grain each h.indled during each of the crop years, ending 1922, 1923, 1924 
inwards and outwards. 9. Which of the above elevators are operated under the 
Canada Grain Act, and under what authority others are operated. 10. Which 
are licensed and bonded by the Board of Grain Commissioners. 11. Insurance 
rate on each in) building; (6) contents. 12. Charges in each and in case of 
conveyor charges, at what ra;te in each case 13. Number of receiving pits in 
each elevator and number of car loading spouts. 14. In which of the above 
elevators " car dtmips " are used, or automatic power, or shovels, and if car 
dumps are used, what make. 15. Whether any of the above elevators are in 
process of construction, or if incomplete, how much still remains to complete. 
16. Operating revenue and operating expenses, exclusive of interest and sinking 
fimd, on each of the above clc\ators. 17. In cases where elevators are leased, 
(a) the rentals; (6) to whom leased; (c) terms of lease. 18. Number of scales 
in each elevator, showing receiving, shipping, bagdng capacitv of each. Presented 
June 19, 1925. Hon. Mr. Stevens .' Not printed. 

34 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5—ConHnued 

219. Rehirn to an Order of the House of March 25, 1925, for a return for the months of 
May and June, 1924, showing invoiced value of importations into Canada of 
canning machinery, suitable for use as equipment in fruit or berrj' canning 
factories, which were released by the Customs Department without duty being 
actually paid thereon, together with copies of all correspondence and documents 
received by the Department of Customs or any member of the Government 
relating to such importations, together with a statement for the first six months 
of 1924. ^howins importations into Canada of canning machinery suitable for 
diuipment in fniit or berry canning factories on which duty was paid, showing 
the amount of duty paid thereon and the invoiced value of such importations. 
Presented June 19, 1925. Mr. Grimmer Not printed. 

230. Return to an Order of the House of June 1, 1925, for a copy of all corre8pon<lence 
exchanged between the Department of Customs and Excise, the Civil Service 
Commission and others, relating to the appointment of a custom.s and exci.se 
examiner at St. Leonard in the electoral district of Restigouche-Madawa.«ka. New 
Brunswick. Pre-^ented June 19, 1925. Mr. Doucet Not printed. 

251. Return to an Order of the House of .Tune 15, 192.5, for a Return .showing: — 1. Number 
of employees on April 1, 1925, in each of the Canadian Penitentiaries. 2. Name, 
rank, creed and salary of each such employee and the date of first, appointment. 

3. Number of employees on April 1 1915. in each of the Canadian Penitentiaries. 

4. Name, rank, creed and salary of each such employee and the date of first 
appointment. Presented June 19. 1925. Mr. Doslauriers Not printed. 

232. Letter from the Auditor General in respect to a statement made by the Acting 
Minister of Finance in the House of Commons (June 11. 1925) dealing with the 
audit made by officials of the Auditor General's office of the securities held by 
the Finance Department, and letter from Mr. Robb, in reply thereto. Presented 
June 19, 1925 Not printed. 

253. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated May 28, 1925, for a return to include copies 

of all correspondence, documents, and other writines relating to the appointment 
or recommendation for appointment of .Joseph McDonald in 1924 or 1925. as an 
•Exci.-!e Prevention Officer in the district of Lincan or of Glace Bay in Nova 
Scotia, and to refusal of the Department of Customs and Excise to accept him 
for the position. Presented Jime 19. 1925. Hon. Mr. Tanner Not printed. 

254. Return to an Order of the House of March 9, 1925, for a copy of all correspondence, 

documents, statements and communications concerning exemption or partial 
exemption from payment of income tax on payments or remuneration, whether 
paid as salary, living allowance or otherwi.^e. b3' the Government of Canada to 
officials of Yukon Territory-, and showing what exemptions (if any) from income 
tax have been allowed to Yukon officials on amounts paid them by the Govern- 
ment of Canada during the p.ast .«even years. Presented June 20, 1925. Mr. 
Black (Yukon) Not printed. 

253. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of March 30, 1925. 
for a copy of all letters, telesrrams. papers and other doc\iments between the 
Government of Canada and the mine workers of Cape Breton, or received by 
the Go\emment on their behalf, and between the Government of Canada and 
the Go\-emment of Nova Scotia, resjiecting the condition of the mine workers, 
and between the Government of Canada and any towns or municipalities in 
Cape Breton, respecting the conditions of the mine workers and the neoessitv 
for relief ownng to the labcur troubles in that district. Presented June 20. 1925. 
Mr. Arthurs Not printed. 

236. Copy of Agreement between the Government of Canada and the Manitoba Pulp 

and Paper Company. Limited, dated .Tune 12. 1925. respecting the right to cut 
pulpwood on certain timber berths in Manitoba, together with schedules to 
agreement marked " A," " B," " C," and " D." Presented June 22, 1925. 

Not printed. 

237. Return to an Order of the House of June 15. 1925, for a Return showing; — 1. The 

total debt of the Canadian National Railways and all its subsidiaries up to 
March 31, 1925. 2. The total revenue of the said railwavs for the year ending 
March 31. 1920, 1921, 1922. 1923, 1924 and 1925. 3. The deficit or .=urplu<! for 
each year from 1920 up to 1925. inclusive. Presented June 22. 1925. Mr. Tobin. 

Not printed. 

35 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

258, 258n. Return and supplementary return to an Urilor of the House of June 8, 1925, for a 
return setting lortih the total expenses incurred by the Special Committee in its 
investigation into Ocean Rates, showing: (n) full amount paid to Mr. Symington 
in fees; (6) the amount in fees still due Mr. Symington as counsel; (c) total 
amount paid and incurred for expenses to. Mr. Symington; (</) the amount paid 
ito each witness for fees and for expenses; ie) the amount paid or proposed to be 
paid to Sir William Peter.sen in fees, or. and, for expenses; (/) amount in full 
paid to W. T. R. Preston in fees or, and. for expenses since .lanuan-, 1934; and 
all other expenses, including reporting and printing, incurred by the Committee, 
or by the authority of the Government. Prosent^-d Jime 22 and 27. 1925. Hon. 
Mr. Stevens Not printed. 

259. Return to an Order of the House of June 15, 1925, for a Return sho^ving: — 1. Number 

of Hog Graders on the pay roll of the Department of Agriculture. 2. Amount 
paid to siich graders, respectively, as salaries, wages, and expenses, for the year 
ending March 31, 1924. 3. Number of veterinary inspectors and lay inspectors, 
respectively, employed by the Department in the inapection of animals slaughtered, 
and the carcasses of such animals in abattoirs and packing-houses in Canada, 
during the year ending March 31, 1924. 4. Amount paid in salaries and w.ages to 
such veterinary and lay insipectors, respectively, for the time mentioned above. 

5. Number of hogs graded by Government inspectors during the year referred to. 

6. Total weight of hogs so graded and the percentage of the whole in each grade 
or classification made by the Government officials. 7. How the output of said 
packing-houses corresponds as to grade for home consimii)tion or for export, with 
the classification of live animals made by Government graders. 8. Whether any 
classification of the output of packing-houses is made by the Government in 
accordance with that made of animals purchased. 9. If not. whv this is not done. 
Presented June 22. 1925. Mr. Sutherland ." Xol printed. 

260. Copy of Order in Council. P.C. 993, dated June 20. 1925. cancelling Order in Council. 

P.C. 623. dated April 23. 1925. rr appointing a Committee to consider and report 
on the most suitable design for a Canadian National Flag for use ashore. Pre:?ented 
June 22, 1925 Not printed. 

2601. Copy of Order in Council. PC. 623. dated April 23. 1925. appointing a Committee to 
consider and report on the most suitable design for a Canadian Nationftl Fla« 
for use ashore. Presented (Senate) June 25. 1925 Not printed. 

261. "Return to an Order of the House of June IS, 1925, for a Return .showing: — 1. How 

many returned soldiers of the Great War are detained in the penitentiaries of 
Canada, and where. 2. What inspection there is of these institutions, by whom, 
when, and whether Government officials are the only inspectors. 3. Whether it is 
the intention of the Government to introduce legislation this session to empower 
grand juries, sitting at the assizes or general sessions of the peace holden in the 
municipality where these institutions are or the nearest municipality. re«ularly 
to visit and inspect these institutions, similar to the law of England and all the 
oversea Dominions (Canada pxceT>ted) and m the same way that juries now 
visit provincial prisons. 4. If not. why not. Presented Jime 23, 1925. Mr. Church. 

Not printed. 

262. Return to an Order of the Hoise of April 22. 1925, for a copy of all correspondence, 

reports, documents, telegrams, or memoranda, passing between the Department 
of .Justice and any other Dep.artments of the Government, or Ministers, or any 
other parties whatsover, within the past six months, rel-.iting to the appointment 
of Inspector of Penitentiaries, and especially relating to the refusal to accept for 
such appointment Ccylonel Eric W. MacDonald of Halifax. Presented June 23. 
1925. Mr. Black {Hnlilnx'i Not vrinted. 

263. Return to an Order of the House of June 0. 1924. for a copy of all correspondence. 

letters, telegram.* and other documents passing between the Government or any 
member thereof and the Canadian Bank of Commerce and the Bank of Hamilton 
OT an.v of the directors of the said banks or any other parties, in any way 
relating to the am.algamation of the Canadian Bank of Commerce and the 
Bank of Hamilton. Presented Jun» 24. 1925. Mr. Coote Not printed. 

36 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5— Continued 

264. Rctiirr to an Order of tlie House of June 18, 1925, for a Return showing: — 1. Number 

of juveniles under IS now detained in the penitentiaries of Canada, wliere, and 
how many 16 or under. 17. 18 and 19 years of age. 2. Whether it is the intention 
of the Government to give efTeet to the recommendations for years of grand 
juries and pubhc bodies to provide separate institutions for these cases. If not, 
why. 3. Whether it is the intention of the Government to so readjust the rules 
of these institutions so that juveniles and first offenders will have preferential 
rules and also a better clas.-ification consideration to those of repeaters. 4. Whether 
it is the intention of the Government in the recess of Parliament to appoint a 
Royal Commission or Committee of the House to go into the whole question of 
prison reform in Canada as suggested in the defcates in Hansard, 1922. If not, 
■why not. Presented June 24, 1925. Mr. Church Xnt printed. 

265. Return to an Order of 'he Hou.se of April 27, 1925, for a Return showing:— 1. Whether 

any retired officers of the Imperial Forces are now employed by the Department 
of National Defence. 2. If so, their names, rank or position. 3. What salaries 
they receive from the Canadian (Jovemment. 4. What pension they receive from 
the Imperial Government 5 Whether the pay and allowances of private soldiers 
in the Permanent Miliiia have been decreased since the year 1922. 6. If so. to 
what extent. 7. Whether the pay and allowances of non-commission<>d officers 
in the Permanent Militia have been decreased since the year 1922. S. If so. 
to what extent. Presented June 24. 1925. Mr. Power A'o? vn'nlcd. 

266. 266a. Return and Supplementary Return to an Order of the House of March 9. 1925, 

for a return showing the numiber of motor cars purchased by the Go\'eniment, 
since January 1, 1912, the make of .said cai^, the total price paid for each, the 
date of purchase, to what duty assigned or by whom used, the total amount of 
gasoline purcha-sed; also, showing the number of building.- in which the said motor 
cars are housed, showing when owned by the Government, date purchased and at 
what price, and when rented, what rental and when leased. .4lso showing the 
number of employees engaged in the care and upkeep of said motor cars, and 
the total amount spent on repairs to these cars, since January 1, 1912. Presented 
June 24, 26, 1925 Mr. Simpson ' A^o^ printed. 

267. Return to an Order of the House of Mav 20, 192S, for a Return showing:— 1. During 

the year 1934, prior to .August 1. what rate per day was paid to the following 
oflTicers. non-commission<^d officers and men of the permanent force of Canada, 
namely. General of various ranks. Colonel. Lieutenant-Colonel, Major. Captain. 
Lieutenant, Second Lieutenant. Regimental Sergeant-Major. Comnany Sergeant- 
MajoT. Sergeant, Corporal and Private. 2. The value in money of any per diem 
allowance paid or furnished each of said ranks in addition to pay during said 
period. 3. The rate of pay and rate of allowance paid each of said ranks since 
August. 1924. Presented June 24. 1925. Mr. Bla<-k (Yukon) A'^o; printed. 

268. Return to an Order of the House of March 23. 1926, for a Return showing:— 1. The 

actual strength of the Canadian Permanent Force. 2. The present number of 
oflicers of the Staff and Permanent Force who are holding the full, temporary and 
brevet ranks: (n) Colonel: (h) Lieutenant-Colonel. 3. The position and the 
salary of the following Generals who are vet in the service: General MacBrien. 
General Ashton, Grneral Panel, General Macdonell, General King, General 
Elmsley, General McNauehton. General Thacker. General Bell. General Ross. 
General Ormond. General Ketchen, General .Armstrong. General I/indry. 4. The 
name of each of those generals who.se tenure of appointment or the extension of 
term will end during the fiscal year. .April 1. 1925. to March 31, 1926. 5. Whether 
the Department of Defence allows a six months' leave with pay and allowances 
to the officers before bein'i pensioned, fi. If so. whether it is the intention of the 
Minister of National Defence to notify, throueh the Adjutant General, each 
general six months before the expiration of his tenure of annointment or his 
extension of term that he will be retired from the service, thus allowing nromotior. 
to other officers. Presented June 24. 1925. Mr. Lanctot Not printed. 

269. Return to an Order of the House of March 23. 1925. for a Return showing:— 1. The 

present number of officers of the Permanent Force who are qualified for a hieher 
rank, but who are waiting for a promotion: (n) Lieutenants for the rank of 
Captain; (h) Captains for the rank of Major; (c) Majors for the rank of Lieu- 
37 



15-16 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1925 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME S— Concluded 

tensnt-Colonel ; id) Lieutenant-Coionels for ihe rank of Colonel; (e) Colonels 
to Command a Militar>' District. 2. Whether the Minister of the Department of 
National Defence intends to retire the generals and other oifieers who have bepn 
in the service for some years, thus stoppinp the promotion on the Staff and in the 
Permanent Force. Presented Juae 24, 1925. Mr. Lanctot Not printt'd. 

270. Return to an Order of the House of June 11, 1925, for a Return showing: — 1. Whether 

Colonel A. H. Borden, lately Assistant Officer Commanding at Toronto, is now 
in receipt of pay and allowances from the Militia Department. 2. If not, on 
what date he retired. 3. On what grounds his retirement was sanctioned. 4. 
Amount of his retiring allowance. Presented June 24, 1925. Mr. Black (Halifax). 

Xot printed. 

271. Copy of Rhincland Security Pact Proposals: Xote from German Government, Febru- 

ary 9. 1925, and reply of French Government thereto of June 16, 1925. Presented 
June 24, 192.5 Not printed. 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 1d 



REPORT 



MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE 



FOR THE 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1924 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PEINTER TO THE KINGS MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1934 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. ie A. 1925 

CONTENTS 

Page 

General 5 

Doininiiin Experimental Farms and Stations 6 

Division of Animal Husbandry 8 

Division of Field Husbandry 8 

Division of Horticulture 8 

Cereal Division 8 

Forage Crops 9 

Poultry Division 9 

Division of Chemistry 9 

Division of Botany 9 

Economic Fibre Production 10 

Bacteriology 10 

Tobacco Division 10 

Bee Division 10 

Division of Hlustration Stations ■ 10 

Extension and Publicity 11 

General 11 

Experimental Station, Charlottetown, P.E.I .' 11 

Experimental Station, Kentville, N.S 12 

Experimental Farm, Nappan, N.S 12 

Ex-perimental Station, Fredericton, N.B 12 

Experimental Station, Ste. Anne do la Pocatiere, Que 13 

Experimental Station, Lennox\'ille, Que 13 

Experimental Station, Cap Rouge, Que 14 

Experimental Station, T.a Fcrmc, Que 14 

E.xperiinental Station, Kapuska.'iing, Ont 15 

Experimental Station, Morden, Man 15 

Experimental Farm, Brandon, Man 15 

Ex-jjerimental Farm, Indian Head. Sask 16 

Experimental Station, Rosthern, Sask 17 

Experimental .'^tation, Scott, Sask 17 

Experimental Station, Swift Current, Sask 18 

Experimental Station, I^ethbridge, Alta 18 

Experimental Station, Lacombe, Alta 18 

Ex-perimental Station, Summerland, B.C 19 

Experimental Station, Invermere, B.C 19 

Experimental Farm, Apassiz, B.C 20 

Ex-perimental Station, Sidney, B.C 20 

Experimental Sub-Stations 21 

Dairy and Cold Storage Branch 21 

General 21 

Extension of Markets Division 23 

Dairy Division 23 

Health of Animals Branch 26 

Pathological Division 29 

Meat and Canned Foods Division 31 

Live Stock Branch 33 

Horse Di vi.sion 33 

Cattle Division 37 

Poult ry Division 42 

Sheep and Swine Division 47 

Markets Intelligence and Stockyards Service Division 61 

Seed Branch 64 

Seed Division 60 

Feed Division 69 

Markets and Fertilizer Division 70 

Entomological Branch 83 

Division of Field Crops and Garden Insects 83 

Division of Poorest Insects 84 

Division of Foreign Pest Suppression 85 

Division of Systematic Entomologj' 87 

Publications 94 

Fruit Branch 04 

Publications Branch 102 

International Institute of Agriculture Branch 107 

16— 1 J 3 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. Id , 

REPORT 

OF THE 

MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE 

1923—24 



To General His Excellency the Right Honourable Lord Byng of Vimy, G.C.B., 
G.C.M.G., M.V.O., Governor General and Commander in Chief of the 
Dominion of Canada. 

May it Ple.\se Yoltj Excellency: 

I have the honour to submit to Your Excellency a report of the Department 
of Agriculture for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1924. 

The work of the department was carried out in a most satisfactory and 
efficient manner, and there will be found included herein a summary of the 
operations of the different Branches of the Department, all of which is laid 
before Your Excellency under their respective headings. 

The legislation affecting the department during the period consisted of: — 

Chapter 3, 13-14, George V, intituled " An Act to amend the Animals 
Contagious Diseases Act." (Assented to April 13, 1923.) 

Chapter 15, 13-14, George V, intituled " An Act to regulate the sale and 
inspection of Fruit and Fruit Containers." (Assented to April 13. 1923.) 

Chapter 18, 13-14, George V, intituled " An Act to amend and consolidate 
the Acts respecting Live Stock." (Assented to April 13, 1923.1 

Chapter 27, 13-14, George V, intituled " An Act respecting the Testing, 
Inspection and sale of Seeds." (Assented to April 13, 1923.) 

Chapter 43, 13-14, George V, intituled " An Act to amend the Dairy Industry 
Act." (Assented to June 13, 1923.) 

Chapter 47, 13-14, George V, intituled " An Act to amend The Feeding 
Stuffs Act." (Assented to June 13, 1923.) 

By proclamation of date 12th day of September, 1923, the " Act respecting 
the Testing, Inspecting and Sale of Seeds," (assented to on the 13th day of April, 
1923), came into operation on the 1st day of October, 1923. (Vide Canada 
Gazette, Vol. LVII, page 1222). 

By Order in Council approved under date May 11, 1923, under and in 
virtue of the pro\isions of section 11 of the Root Vegetables Act, 1922 (P.C. 840), 
the regulations relative to containers in which potatoes shall be packed, estab- 
lished by Order in Council of August 2, 1922, were amended by adding thereto 
a section providing penalties for infractions. (Vide Canada Gazette. Vol. LVI, 
1923, page 4784. 



6 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1923 

By Order in Council approved under date June 26, 1923, (P.C. 1148, 
Regulations dealing with fruit packages were established under and in virtue ol 
the provisions of subsection 5 of section 10 of the Act of 13-14, George V. 
intituled " An Act to regulate the Sale and Inspection of Fruit and Fruit 
Containers." (Vide Canada Gazette, Vol. LVl, Supplement, June 30, 1923.) 

By Order in Council approved under date June 26, 1923, (P.C. 1149), 
Regulations dealing with the inspection and branding or marking of imported 
fruit were established, under and in virtue of the provisions of section 5 of the 
Act ol 13-14, George V, intituled " An Act to regulate the Sale and Inspection 
of Fruit and Fruit Containers." (Vide Canada Gazette, Vol. LVI, Supplement, 
June 30, 1923.) 

By Order in Council approved under date June 26, 1923, (P.C. 1150), the 
Regulations under the Destructive Insect and Pest Act established by Order in 
Council of May 17, 1917, were rescinded and new regulations substituted in lieu 
thereof. (Vide Canada Gazette, Vol. LVI, Supplement, June 30, 1923.) 

By Order in Council approved under date June 26, 1923, (P.C. 1151), the 
Regulations respecting the grading and marking of eggs a? established by 
Order in Council (P.C. 2001) of date September 25, 1922. and amendments 
thereto, were rescinded and new regulations established and substituted in lieu 
thereof. (Vide Canada Gazette, Vol. LVI, Supplement, June 30, 1923.) 

By Order in Council approved under date October 12, 1923, (P.C. 2076) 
under and in virtue of the provisions of chapter 43 of the Statutes of 1923, 
13-14, George V, intituled " An Act to amend the Dairj- Industrj' Act, 1914," 
the regulations established under the provisions of tlie Dairy Industry Act, 
1914. as amended, were further amended. (Vide Canada Gazette, Vol. LVII, 
page 1343.) 

By Order in Council approved under date March 4, 1924, (P.C. 352), under 
and in virtue of the provisions of section 9 of the Live Stock and Live Stock 
Products Act, 1923, section 3 of the Regulations respecting the grading of hogs 
as approved by Order in Council, (P.C. 2035), of date October 6. 1922, was 
amended. (Vide Canada Gazette, Vol. LVII, page 3321.) 

By Order in Council approved under date March 12, 1924, (P.C. 398), 
Regulations established by Order in Council, (P.C. 317), under and in ^^^tue 
of the provisions of the Dairy Produce Act, chapter 28 of the Statutes of 1921. 
were amended. (Vide Canada Gazette, Vol. LVII, page 3511.) 



DOMINION EXPERIMENTAL FARMS AND STATIONS 

The total value of all field crops in 1923 is estimated by the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics as having value of $899,166,200, as compared with 
$962,293,200 in 1922. This is a decrease of $63,127,000. caused mainly by lower 
prices in almost every crop. Following will be found a table showing the 
estimated area, yields, and valuation of the various field crops throughout 
Canada, and also a table showing the nimiber of farm live stock in the 
Dominion: — 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

AREAS AND ESTIMATES OF YIELD AND VALUE OF FIELD CROPS, 1923 



Crop 


Area 


Yield 
per acre 


Total 
yield 


Weight per 

measured 

bushel 


Average 

price per 

bushel 


Total 
value 


Full wheat 


acres 

815,706 

21,856,158 

22,671,864 

14,387,807 

2,784,571 

1,448,142 

169,330 

63,151 

440,121 

843,757 

629,938 

317,729 

560,942 
194,512 

9, 72.'), 602 
659,070 
22,450 
391,116 


bush. 

23-75 
20-75 
21-00 
39-25 
27-75 
16-00 
17-00 
16-50 
22-25 
35-25 
11-30 
42-75 

cwt. 
99-00 
196-00 

tons 
1-.55 
8-10 
9-60 
2-65 


bush. 

19,315,000 

454,884,000 

474,199,000 

563, 997.. TOO 

76,997,800 

23,231,800 

2,898,200 

1,041,700 

9,743,700 

29,7.TO,.500 

7,139,500 

13,608,000 

cwt. 
55,497,000 
38,116,500 

tons 

14,844,900 

5,320,800 

216,200 

1,028,600 


lbs. 

60-23 
58-55 
58-80 
35 -.55 
47-19 
54-61 
60-00 
59-09 
47-80 
44-19 
54-63 
55-29 


$ 

0-92 
O-fifi 
0-67 
0-33 
0-42 
0-49 
1-72 
2-66 
0-84 
0-59 
1-77 
0-92 

per cwt. 
102 
0-59 

per ton 
10-97 
4-62 
fi-48 
11-58 


$ 
17,850,900 




299,083,800 


All wli«-at 


316,934,700 


Oats 


184,8.57,400 


Barley..' 


,32,570,700 


Rve 


11,339,900 


Peas 


4,987,400 




2,773,000 




8,191,700 




17.654,800 


Flr-x 


12,643,900 




12,406,000 




56.397,800 


Turnips, mangel, etc 




22,483,100 




162.882,000 






24,605,000 






1,401,000 


Alfalfi 




11,914,000 









NUMBER OF FARM LIVE STOCK IN THE DOMINION, 1919-23 



Live Stock 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


1923 




3,667,369 
3,548,437 
6, 536,. 573 
3,421,958 
4,040,070 


3,400,352 
3,. 504, 692 
6, 067,. 504 
3,720,783 
3,516,678 


3,813,921 
3,736,832 
6,469,373 
3,675,860 
3,904,895 


3,648,871 
3,745,804 
6,074,065 
3,262,626 
3,915,684 


3,530,641 




3,6.59,365 


Other cattle 


5,586,866 




2,753,860 




2,753,860 







Following will be found some very brief notes indicating the results 
achieved and progress made on the various Experimental Farms and Stations. 
These may be characterized in general as very satisfactory indeed. 

In addition to the regular three issues of Seasonable Hints and the sending 
out of several hundred press articles, the following bulletins, pamphlets and 
circulars were issued during the year: — ■ 

BXTLLETINS, NEW SERIES 

No. 28. Rabbits. 

No. 33. Bees and How to Keep Them. 

No. 36. Medicinal Plants and Their Cultivation in Canada. 

PAMPHLETS, NEW SERIES 

No. 35. Silage and Silo Construction for the Maritime Provinces. 
No. 39. How should Canada Export Beef Cattle. 



EXHIBmON CIRCULARS 

No. 107. Growing of Feeds for the Winter Feeding of Beef Cattle, 
No. 108. Flowers for the Prairie Home. 
Complete Index to Seasonable Hints. 



8 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
Division of Animal Husbandry 

With horses the breeding work with Clydesdales was continued, and also 
the collection of data as to work performe<i and cost of work bj- horses. Some 
interesting work was done with beef cattle in the sending of two trial ship- 
ments overseas. Of the results of these shipments the first appears in pamphlet 
No. 39 and the second is reported on in the Report of the Division of Animal 
Husbandry. 

The dairy cattle have continued to show improvement. Tuberculosis, while 
not entirely eradicated, has been kept still more closely in check. Some impor- 
tations of pure-bred cattle were made, and an exhibit of Ayrshires, made at 
the Royal Winter Fair, was exceptionally successful. Importations of pure-bred 
swine were also made and a wide range of experimental work was continued, 
much of it looking to the production and correct feeding of the bacon type of 
hog. Work in the dairy was continued along usual lines, and much assistance 
was obtained both in the cattle barns and dairy through the co-operation of 
the newly-formed Division of Bacteriology-. 

Agricultural survey work was continued in the province of Quebec, and the 
results, combined with those of the previous year, are being brought out in 
Bulletin form. 

Division of Field Husb.^xdry 

As a rule, large crop yields were secured on the Central Farm in 1923, 
such as oats, 67-4 bushel per acre; wheat, 38-6 bushels per acre; barley, 56 4 
bushels per acre; hay, 3-8 tons per acre; corn, 15-4 tons per acre; mangels, 21-4 
tons per acre. Accurate records were, as usual, kept on cost of production of 
field crops on all the Farms throughout the System. Experimental work was 
conducted on various rotations, cultural methods, use of farm manure vs. 
commercial fertilizer, etc., etc. 

Division of Horticlt-tl're 

As in previous years the work of this division was continued mainly along 
practical lines. For many years it has paid special attention to the originating 
of new varieties of fruits better suited to the different conditions of Canada, and, 
in all, six silver Wilder awards have been won from the American Pomological 
Society, the oldest association of the kind in America. The one in 1923 was 
for the Lobo apple, originated in the Horticultural Division. 

An investigation was conducted into the cause of the breakdown of the 
Jonathan apple, strong evidence being secured that the greatest cause of this 
trouble lies in stage of maturity at which the apples are picked. Work was 
also conducted on the identification of varieties of apples by their leaves and 
with the work in fruit breeding. In vegetable gardening there were continued 
the usual tests of varieties, and also a considerable amount of breeding work 
to secure earlier varieties. A bulletin on " Modem Orchard Practices " was 
brought out during the year. 

Cere-vl DmsioN 

The chief function of this division is to discover or produce superior varie- 
ties of cereal grains, peas, beans, flax, hemp and buckwiieat. Practically all 
the cross breeding work in connection with this is conducted at the Central 
Farm, the product being sent to the branch Farm for wider testing and multipli- 
cation, in cases where the product proves of value. Breeding work with wheat 
to secure a variety resistant to rust is an important feature. The work in 
milling and baking, discontinued for several years, was resumed this year. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 9 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

The usual testing of varieties was continued on some 3,277 plots. The 
distribution of small samples of seed was, however, discontinuued, its place 
being taken by special opportunity afforded to secure larger quantities of pure 
seed. 

FoR.\GE Crop.s 

Work in this division was continued and a special opportunity for corn 
breeding work has been provided for 1924 by the extension of the area on what 
was formerly the tobacco station at Harrow, in southwestern Ontario. 

A large number of grasses and clovers, biennials and perennials and hay 
crops were under trial. The improved variety " Boon " timothy, originated 
at the Central Farm, is being multiplied. Over ten thousand isolations of indi- 
vidual sunflower plants were made, and a large number of tests of field root< 
were conducted in order to establish a standard variety. 

Poultry Division 

The work of this division is becoming more and more widespread and 
important. The breeding work is yielding excellent results, both on the Central 
and on many of the branch Farms, as is the work with feeds and feeding both 
of chicks and of hens and pullets for winter egg production. The study of 
poultry diseases is facilitated by the co-operation of an officer of the Health of 
Animals Branch, who devotes his full time to this work. 

An interesting feature of the work of the division is the egg laying con- 
tests, one of which is conducted in each province of the Dominion, as well as 
the national one at the Central Farm, Ottawa, Records made in these contests 
are now made the basis of registration. 

A considerable amount of field work, or poultry survey work, is being 
done especially in the province of Quebec with excellent results. 

Division of Chemistry 

The year's work consisted largely in the continuation of lines of investi- 
gation invohdng analysis and furnishing information on soils, manures, fertil- 
izers, forage crops, feeding stuffs, waters, insecticides and fungicides, etc., etc., 
together with a considerable amount of analysis of food samples for the Meat 
and Canned Foods Di\nsion and work for other departments of tlie Govern- 
ment. 

Division of Bot.\ny 

In economic botany the division has maintained and extended its services 
to farmers relative to weed extermination. A number of addresses on this topic 
have been given and a large amount of printed material sent out'. A weed 
sur^-ey has also been made by means of a questionnaire sent out to a large 
number of farmers. A number of poisonous plants, samples of which were sent 
in, have also been examined and reports made. 

In plant patholog>- continued progress has been carried on. The depart- 
ment was represented at the International Conference in plant pathologj' at 
Wageningen, Holland, during tlie year, and a statement presented re inter- 
national plant disease investigation. The study of white pine blister rust and 
rust of wheat and cereal smut' was continuetl. as well as the seed potato certi- 
fication and mosaic free raspberries distribution. 



10 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 george v, a. 1925 

Economic Fibhe Pbodxjction 

Owing to late spring and unfavourable growing weather, the yields of flax 
were considerably lower in 1'923 than in the previous year. The experimental 
work comprised variety tests, harvesting at different stages of maturity, seed- 
ing experiments, application of commercial fertilizers, retting experiments, tests 
of the Boby scutching machine, cost of growing an acre of flax and converting 
the same into fibre, etc., etc. The possibilities of producing fibre flax at a 
number of the branch Farms are well brought out and a certain amount of 
extension work was carried on at Caraquet, N.B. 

Bacteriology 

This division was created during the year for the purpose of dealing with 
those problems of agriculture essentially bacteriological. It will, of course, in 
carrj'ing out this policy, maintain tlie closest co-operation with other di%'isions. 
A laboratory- is being formed for its use. It will take charge of the sending out 
of nitro culture for legiuminous crops formerly handled by the Botanical Di\'i- 
sion. Its main lines of investigation will be pure milk production, bacterio- 
logical life in soils, retting of flax, etc., etc. 

T0B.4.CC0 Division 

The season of 1923 was very unfavourable, both in Ontario and Quebec, 
as far as yields were concerned. The quality, however, of the bright flue-cured 
tobacco was exceptionally good. During the last few years, special attention 
has been devoted to varieties of aromatic tobacco likely to become acclimatized 
in the province of Quebec, and certain varieties of these are giving great promise 
in this regard. The usual experiments were carried on in the applications of 
fertilizers of different formulae, the preparation and treatment of the tobacco 
seed bed and seedlings, transplanting, cultivation, topping, han^esting, curing, 
fermenting, etc., and also the treatment of diseased land. 

Bee DmsioN 

The winter of 1922-23 was noted for tTie large number of colonies which 
perished from lack of or unwholesome stores or insuflScient protection. During 
the season of 1923. however, excellent yields in honey production were obtained 
at a large number of Experimental Stations throughout the Dominion. The 
experiments carried on were mainly the effort to ascertain the value of bees 
as agents in the cross pollenation, a comparative test of various means and 
rates of foundation ex-periments in swarm control, tests of various sizes of 
hives, and means of protecting colonies. 

Division of lLLrsTR.\TioN St.\tions 

The work of this division has widened, thirty-six new sites have been 
selected, making a total number of Stations now 125, located as follows; six 
stations in Prince Edward Island, fifteen in Nova Scotia, seventeen in New 
Brunswick, thirty-five in Quebec, seven in Ontario, twenty in Saskatchewan, 
twelve in Alberta, and thirteen in British Columbia. 

The work of the Divisions of Illustration Stations briefly is to carry to 
the farmer in his own district and especially in those cases where he is so far 
remote that he cannot visit the Experimental Farm itself the proved results 
of experiments, thereby demonstrating to him their practical money making 



REPOUT OF THE MINISTER 11 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

value a* applied to his farm practise. Most excellent resuliis have been obtained 
from this work, such as crop rotations, time and manner of cultivation and 
seedinp;. smut control, clover seed growing, introducing new crops, growing 
certified seed potatoes and registered seed grain, summerfallow treatment, 
growing corn and sunflowei-s as summerfallow substitutes, etc., etc. In con- 
nection with all this work careful cost of production records are kept. Field 
meetings are held wherever possible, and every effort is made to stimulate the 
interest of the farmer. 

Extension and Publicity 

The work of this division may be briefly defined as an endeavour to carrj' 
to the farmer some of the results obtained on the Experimental Farms by means 
of educational exhibits, collecting and editing material for the press, assembling 
and preparing for publication material for " Seasonable Hints ", preparing 
material for lectures and sets of lantern slides, etc., etc. During the year 
exhibits were made at fiftj'-nine different points, and speaking briefly it may be 
said that the activities and usefulness of the Division are limited only by its 
ability to fill the numbers of requests received from the public for its information 
and material. 

General 

Besides the activities which may be attributed to some special division of 
the work at the Central Farm, there is a large amount of work being done and a 
great deal of information sent out; among these may be included the work of 
the Draughting Room, where in addition to the drawing up of the plans and 
specifications for most of the buildings to be erected upon the Experimental 
Farms themselves, much assistance is given the farmer in the construction or 
repair of his farm buildings. Sets of stock plans are kept on hand of almost 
every style and size of building which might be required, lumber specifications 
for tlie same, etc., etc., arc available free for the asking, and through corre- 
spondence all possible information is furnished him in his construction and repair. 

Experimental St.\tion, Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

Seeding was not general until May 18, fully a week later than usual. The 
summer was cool and crops matured slowly; pastures were good throughout the 
entire season. During the year, the Henrietta Connolly property of three acres 
was added to the Station. The work of draining the Blake property was con- 
tinued and the Station buildings were kept in good repair. 

With dairy cattle, the Ayrshire breed was greatly improved by the addition 
from the Central Farm at Ottawa of Lord Kyle 8th No. 81916, the Junior 
Champion at the 1923 Royal at Toronto, Ont., and by the excellent young 
heifers bred at the Station. The herd including young calves numbered eighteen 
at the close of the year. Experiments in feeding steers were continued as was 
work with swine breeding, the demand for young pigs from boys' clubs being so 
great as entirely to take up all the spring litters. 

With poultrj', work was continued in developing uniform bred-to-lay strains 
of Barred Plymouth Rocks and Single Comb White Leghorns. The 5th Egg 
Laying Contest closed in October, the average number of eggs per hen being 160. 

The usual work was carried on in production of field crops, cultural experi- 
ments and variety tests of cereals, forage crops, fruits, vegetables, etc. 

A considerable amount of work was done in attending and addressing 
agricultural meetings and showing at fairs. 

Six Illustration Stations located on the island were under the immediate 
supervision of the superintendent during the year. 



12 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

16 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
Experimental Station, KsNTvaLLE, X.S. 

Spring was late and summer temperatures were low, thus maturity of crops 
was delayed. 

With fruit, the blossoming period was late, but the fall was favourable and 
the fruit was well coloured. .\ considerable percentage of it was blown off by 
two severe wind storms during the growing season. 

Extensive work was continued in the control of apple diseases and insects, 
also in the production of special early vegetable crops, growing of disease-free 
potatoes, etc. 

Work with forage crops embraced tests of clovers and grasses of different 
strains and the mixtures of the same likely to prove desirable for hay. Varieties 
of roots and sunflowers were also tested. 

With field husbandrj', the work included tests to gather information as to 
the fodder crops likely to give most economical returns for the labour required to 
produce them. It was shown that while Indian corn can be grown more cheaply 
than roots, the lack of special storage facilities for the former makes roots a 
cheaper crop to grow. Extensive work was conducted with fertilizers; the value 
of ground limestone in the production of hay and cereal crops was well brought 
out. 

An experimental shipment of steers was made to England and the returns 
above cost of transportation, showed one cent per pound live weight more than 
local buyers were offering at the time. 

With poultry, considerable progress has been made in the production of 
heavy laying strains and the work with bees has been increased to include 
seventy colonics with two out-apiaries of four colonies each. 

Fifteen Illustration Stations are under the direct supervision of the super- 
intendent. 

EXPEKIMENT.\L FaRM, -SAPPAN, N.S. 

Spring opened late, seeding being delayed until the last of May. but a 
favourable fall permitted of harvesting all crops in excellent condition. 

With live stock. Guernseys, Shorthorns, and Holsteins are kept on the 
Station, both grades and pure-breds. With the first named breed, the first prize 
in the senior calf class and reserve junior championship were won at the Royal 
Show. With swine, the Yorkshires and Berkshires are being kept and figures 
on cost of maintenance of pork production, housing conditions, and breeding 
for bacon type are being collected. With sheep, the Shropshires only are main- 
tained. No breeding work has yet been done with horses. 

Variety tests were carried on with cereals, forage crops, tree fruits, «mall 
fruits, and vegetables. 

In poultry, the 4th Egg Laying Contest was completed at the end of 
November. The average production per hen in the contest was 143 3 eggs. In 
the Station flock, the highest egg record so far obtained is 308 eggs for the 
year. 

Exhibits from the Station were shown at a number of points in the province 
during the season, and addresses were delivered by the superintendent and his 
assistants. 

Experimental St.\tion, Fredericton, N.B. 

The Holstein, Ayrshire, and dual purpose Shorthorn breeds are ki^pt here, 
the herd having been fully accredited as free from tuberculosis, on February 
36, 1923. Ex-perimental work in feeding, breeding, and housing is conducted 
with all these. The breed of sheep kept is the Shropshire, with which various 
breeding and feeding experiments arc conducted. No experimental work is 
being carried on with horses, they being kept for farm labour only. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 13 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

With poultry, egg production was liigher than during any previous year, 
one hen in the Farm fiock laying 306 eggs. Hatching results, however, were 
unsatisfactory. In the Egg I>aying Contest, the average was higher than in 
the previous year, being 163 25 eggs per hen. 

Variety tests were continued with cereals and some especially interesting 
work was done in the use of fertilizers. 

In field husbandry, a comprehensive system of crop rotations was com- 
menced. 

The superintendent had supervision over the Illustration Stations con- 
ducted in the province, the work from which is already showing excellent results. 

EXPERIMENT.\L STATION, StE. AnNE DE L.\ PoCATIERE, QuE. 

The severe winter of 1922-23 delayed the opening of spring, the first grain 
being sown on May 5. The cold spring was followed by a severe drought ending 
only in the middle of August, which resulted in very poor crop yields, with the 
exception of late crops which benefited by moisture and warm weather in late 
summer and early fall. 

A stud of Percheron horses is being built up at this Station. With dairy 
cattle, the Ayrshire is the best breed kept, and it was much improved this year 
by the introduction of a few cows of excellent quality. Experimental work is 
being carried on in the rearing of calves and tlie feeding of dairy cattle to deter- 
mine the comparative values of com and sunflower silage, oat hay and roots. 

In horticulture, variety tests were conducted with tree fruits, small fruits, 
vegetables, potatoes, shrubs, and flowers, and also tests with varieties of cereals 
and forage crops. In the latter two cases, however, the severe drouglit prac- 
tically destroyed the plots and made the results of little or no value. 

During the year, a Plant Pathplogical Laboratory was erected on the 
Station. 

An Egg Laying Contest was commenced during the year with poultry, being 
made up of twelve pens. Results cannot be given until next fall. 

The year was a very poor one for bees owing to the late spring and lack of 
blossom. 

Eighteen Illustration Stations are under the direction of the superintendent 
and were regularly visited. Although many of these suffered from seasonal 
conditions, yet the work at all was carefully conducted. 

During the year, the superintendent and his assistants gave over forty 
addresses on farm topics and a number of exhibits were shown at various fairs. 

Exi'erim?:ntal St.\tiox, Lenxoxville, que. 

The summer was cool but with abundant rainfall which gave good yields 
of field crops with the exception of corn which was late. 

No experimental work with horses was conducted, but the imported Shire 
stallion " Snelston Topper '" (38528) was kept at the Station during the year. 
With cattle, Ayrshires, Jerseys, and Shorthorns are kept, anrl experimental feed- 
ing of steers was also conducted during the winter. With sheep, the purebred 
Oxford Down and high grade Oxfords arc kept, the purebred ram lambs to 
be sold for breeding stock and the others as market lambs. With swine, the 
main object is breeding and feeding for production of the bacon type of hog. 

The work in field husbandry included experiments in drainage, renovation 
of pasture land, experiments with lime and fertilizers, tests of rotations and 
cultural methods, etc. In all this work cost of production is kept. Experi- 
mental work with forage crops was considerably extended during the year. 



14 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1926 

With horticulture, a wide field of experiment is covered. With three fruits, 
difficult conditions are encountered owing to severe winter conditions. 

With poultry, the Farm flock is an excellent one. In the Egg Laying Con- 
test, twenty-throe birds proved eligible for registration and the highest individual 
record was 253 eggs. 

A considerable amount of fencing was done during the year. An exhibit 
from the Station was shown at a number of fairs and members of the staff 
addressed a number of agricultural meetings. Field Days and a special Farmers' 
Day at which some two thousand people were present, were held during the 
year. 

Experimental Station, Cap Rouge, Qxje. 

The year 1923 was colder, drier and duller than the average of the last 
seven j'ears. Most crops, however, were fairly good with the exception of 
timothy hay, Swede turnips, and some garden crops. 

A feature of the work at Cap Rouge, or rather at the Horse Farm at St. 
Joachim which is under the control of the Cap Rouge superintendent, is the 
breeding of the French-Canadian horse, in which remarkable success is being 
obtained as noted by the fact that in 1923, twenty-nine first prizes, all diplomas 
and the Godin cup were won. With French-Canadian cattle, more first prizes 
were won than by any other herd. Experimental work is conducted in breed- 
ing, feeding and housing poultry. The most important work is that of breeding. 

The work in field husbandry comprises experiments in soil and crop manage- 
ment, including the use of fertilizers. 

In cereals and horticulture, a wide range of variety testing is being carried 
on as well as some breeding work. 

During the year a creamery was built, considerable fencing erected, and 
some draining and clearing done. A large number of excursionists visited the 
Station during the year. 

Experimental Station, La Ferme, Que. 

Nineteen twenty-three was one of the most unfavourable seasons ever 
experienced in the district. Spring was late and no seeding was done before 
the 25th of May. 

With live stock, horses are kept only for the Station work, no experiments 
having yet been undertaken. The dairy herd is made up of pure-bred Ayrshires 
and Ayrshire and Holstein grades. The sheep are composed partly of pure- 
bred Cheviots and the remainder grades, they being utilized for experimental 
work both in the production of lamb and mutton and of wool. With swine, 
there is a considerable demand for breeding stock from farmers in the district, 
the remainder being kept for experimental feeding. 

The field crops were all much below the average on account of weather 
conditions. During the year, thirty-eight acres were cleared bringing the total 
cleared area of the Farm up to 238 acres. 

Extensive tests of varieties were carried on with forage plants and in 
horticulture. 

The flock of poultry has become well established and some excellent experi- 
mental work is being done. 

During the year the sheep shed was built and the reconstruction of the 
piggery was finished, as well as repairs to various buildings. 

Exhibits were sent to several neighbouring points. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 15 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

EXPERIMENT/U. STATION, KaPUSKASINO, OnT. 

Seeding commenced on May 1, the earliest date on record at this Station. 
Growth, however, was retarded by drought until after June 22, and snow after 
the middle of September made harvesting very difficult. 

The present dairy herd at the Station consists of pure-bred and grade 
Ayrshire?, and the beef herd of grade Shortiiorns. The entire herd at the 
Station is accredited. With sheep, considerable experimental work was con- 
ducted and a large number of young rams were sold as breeding stock to 
settlers. The same may be said of swine. With horses, no breeding work has 
yet been undertaken. 

In field husbandry, the yields in 1923 were higher than those in previous 
years due to more favourable weather conditions. Some of the experimental 
work being carried on is to ascertain the best mixtures of grain, the best rates 
of seeding, crops best suited to the district, study of rotations, cultural methods, 
etc., etc. 

The work with horticulture includes the testing of varieties of tree and 
small fruits, vegetables, shrubs, and flowers. 

With forage crops and cereals, variety testing was carried on. 

The experimental work with poultry is along the lines of breeding, feeding, 
housing and general management methods. There was a considerable sale of 
cockerels for breeding purposes and eggs for hatching. 

While the yield of honey was light, the bees came through the winter in 
excellent condition. 

During the year a new log sheep barn and log poultrj- house were con- 
structed, considerable repairs done, as well as fencing and farm roads made. 

During the year, five Illustration Stations were opened, these to be under 
the super\-ision of the superintendent. 

Experimental Station, Morden, Man. 

Tlie year 1923 was the poorest on record for the farmers of the Morden 
district, owing to cold spring weather followed by hot dry weather. Severe 
damage from rust resulted. 

In live stock, work is conducted with Percheron horses, Ayrshire dairy 
cattle, and Hampshire sheep, records being kept of cost of maintenance and 
young stock being sold at moderate prices. Some excellent dairy records are 
being made. 

In field husbandry, two new rotations thought possibly suitable to southern 
Manitoba were commenced during the year. With cereals and forage crops, 
variety tests were conducted. 

Horticulture, as heretofore, was made a special feature of the work of the 
Station, and some excellent work is under way. Three trial orchards have been 
establislicd and a new greenhouse has been erected. With vegetables, much 
variety testing work was conducted and the ornamental planting has becti 
extended. 

With poultrj', the object in view is high egg production with presers'ation of 
standard sizes and colour of plumage of Barred Rocks and Single Comb Rhode 
Island Reds. 

A nimaber of meetings were addressed and exhibits made by the super- 
intendent and his assistants during the year. 

Experiment.\l Farm, Brandon, Man. 

Spring was late and no seeding was possible imtil May, while growth was 
backward until June. Later a verj* severe attack of stem rust in wheat 



16 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1926 

occurred, which cut the crop to less than half of what it would have been. 
Other crops were somewhat affected by rust, but on the other hand, the returns 
from these were satisfactory. Early fall frost did some damage to the com crop. 

The herd of dual purpose shorthorn cattle continues to imporve by breeding 
and selection. Experimental work in steer feeding was continued, and the 
trench silo dug as an experiment in 1922 has proved such a success as to attract 
attention and many enquiries not only from Manitoba but from adjoining 
States of the Union. 

With swine breeding, work has been continued with a view of the formation 
of a bacon type of hog. 

Breeding work was continued with Clydesdale horses and Oxford Down 
sheep. 

In field husbandry the rotation work was again interrupted by the flooding 
of the Assinboine river. A wide range of cultural experiments with grain and 
forage crops was conducted, and also tests of varieties of both these. In 
horticulture special attention is given to experimental work with potatoes. 
Variety test work was also carried on with other varieties of vegetables and 
small fruits. In tree fruits the hardy plums and crab apples are giving good 
results, but not yet the standard apples. 

Progress is to be reported in the development of good utility strains of 
Barred Rocks and White Wyandotte. The average egg production is showing 
steady increase. The fourth year of the Manitoba Egg Laj'ing Contest was 
completed on October 30 with a greatly increased production over previous 
years. 

An exhibit was sent to a number of the local fairs in the province, and also 
to the provincial exhibition and the horticultural show at Brandon. The super- 
intendent and his assistants also addresed a number of agricultural meetings and 
wrote a number of papers on agricultural subjects. 

EXPERIMENT.\L FaRM, InDIAN He.M), SaSK. 

The season of 1923 was remarkable for heavy precipitation during the latter 
part of June and the month of July. However, only fair yields were obtained, 
except with hay, which was a good crop. Damage from rust and other diseases 
was serious with the grain crops. 

The breeding of Clydesdale horses is a feature of the work at this Farm. 
Four fillies won one first, one third and two ninth prizes at the Royal Winter 
Fair in Toronto and the same at the International at Chicago, both in competi- 
tion with some of the best specimens of the breed on the continent. With cattle 
the Shorthorn breed is kept. The herd at present consists of sixty-seven pure 
brcds and also sixty steers on feeding experiments. The object with the pure- 
bred herd is to develop good beef lines together with profitable milk production. 
Extensive feeding experiments were carried on with this herd during the year. 

Breeding operations were continued with both York? liire and Berkshire swine 
witii improvement in both strains from the standpoint of the bacon hog. Com- 
parison of various pastures and of self feeders with feeding by hand were made. 

With sheep pure-bred Shropshires and grades are kept. 

In field husbandry a considerable number of rotations are under way, 
together with a wide range of cultural experiments. 

Variety tests with cereals, and forage crops were conducted together with 
small fruits and vegetables. With tree fruits, hardy plums and crab apples 
yielded very well, but although some seedlings and hybrids of standard apples 
have started to fruit and show hardiness and good quality, nothing definite as 
yet can be said as to these. 



REPORT OF THE MIMSTER 17 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

The work with poultry is confined to tiie Wiiite Wyandottes and an excellent 
strain is being formed lierc. At the Saskatchewan Egg Laying Contest, con- 
ducted at this Farm, a distinct improvement in yield is noticed each year from 
tlic Ijirds entered therein. 

During the year exhibits were made at a number of points and tlie super- 
intendent and his assistants did considerable work in classes of live stock, 
judging, delivering addresses, writing agricultural articles, etc., etc. 

Experimental Station, Rostiierx, Sask. 

Early drought caused premature heading out of early and early sown 
varieties, but the latter ones yielded very satisfactorily. 

During the winter of 1922-23, sixty-six steers were fattened comparing 
sunflower silage with turnips, and during 1923-24 the same experiment is being 
repeated with fifty-nine steers. In both years so far the ensilage is showing a 
considerable advantage. 

From the excellent small herd of Holsteins on the Farm the average yearly 
production for eight cows that completed the R.O.P. test was 13,608 pounds of 
milk and 4.58.5 pounds of butter fat. 

The present flock of sheep is a high grade one evolved from a flock of grade 
ewes and Leicester rams. The principal work being done is an attempt to solve 
the problem of goitre in young lambs. 

With swine the Berkshire and Tam worth breeds and their crosses are being 
compared as to the production of marketable hogs of a desirable type, and 
pasture experiments are also being carried on. 

The work with rotations and cultural experiments is being continued, the 
former especially with a view to the prevention of soil drifting and exter- 
mination of weeds. In horticulture marked progress has made and 1923 was 
notable for the high yield of apples, none of them, however, being larger than 
crabs. 

The usual test of variety work was conducted with cereals and forage crops. 

During the year the superintendent addressed twenty-one public meetings 
and a display of farm produce was made at some of the local fairs. A con- 
siderable number of excursions and picnics took place at the Station during the 
year, especially in the month of July. 

Experimp;nt.\l Station, Scott, Sask. 

The summer of 1923 was favourable throughout northwestern Saskatchewan, 
resulting in yields above the average and good qualities of grain. 

The Shorthorn herd at the Station now number thirty head. With horses 
the Percheron breed is kept, and these animals are used both for breeding work 
and for doing the work on the Station. With swine comparative feeding experi- 
ments were conducted, and also with the flock of sheep. 

In field husbandry, the work compri-ses the comparative study of rotations, 
their suitability, rates and costs and cultural experiments. 

The work in horticulture, as is customary at tliis Station, gave excellent 
returns from vegetables and small fruits. With cereals and forage crops the 
customary test of varieties was conducted. With poultry and bees work was 
continued, the former comprising feeding, housing and breeding experiments. 
With the bees a comparison in wintering was made between wintering in the 
cellar and wintering outdoors. 

An exhibit from the Station was made at six fairs, and a number of addresses 
were delivered during the year by the superintendent and his staff. 
16—2 



18 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
Experimental Station, Swift Current, Sask. 

Experimental work at this Station is now fairly under way. The season of 
1923 was one of the wettest on record, the precipitation for May, June. July 
being 12.88 inches, as compared with a 3S-year average for these months of 
7-35. There was thus a heavy growth of straw and some crops lodged, while 
there was a certain amount of damage from rust, but wheat yielded 30 bushels 
per acre and oats 70 bushels per acre. In field husbandry the cultural experi- 
ments started in 1923 were continued, as was the test work with cereals and 
forage crops. In animal husbandry a herd of Shorthorns has been well estab- 
lished, it now comprising twenty-three animals. 

During the year two cottages, an implement shed and work shop and two 
portable granaries, also a cattle stable, were constructed, and an abundant supply 
of good water was obtained. 

Experimental Station, Lethbridqe, Alta. 

Work on the land commenced the second week in April. Conditions during 
the growing season were fair, and a good yield of high grade wheat resulted. 
The western half of southern Alberta may be regarded as having obtained a 
wonderful crop in 1923, and most of the remaining part of good crop with the 
exception of a small area in the southeast. A few small localities suffered during 
July and early August from hail storms. 

With live stock, experimental work was conducted with various feeding tests 
for steers and lambs and the pasturing of sheep on the forest resen-e was con- 
tinued. With poultry the Barred Rock is the only breed kept and an excellent 
laying strain has been developed. During 1923 some outstanding records were 
made. One pullet laid 315 eggs in 365 days; 20 pullets averaged 229 eggs each, 
and fifty pullets 211. The average for all pullets kept for the year was 200 
eggs per bird. 

The Alberta Egg Laying Contest is being conducted at this Station and 
is causing great interest'. 

Beekeeping is becoming a commercial proposition in the irrigated section 
of southern Alberta, and is being given special attention on the Station, the 
number of colonies in 1923 being over thirty and the average production of 
extracted honey 190 pounds per colony. 

The rotation work on both the dr\' and irrigated farms was continued 
during the year, there being eight rotations under trial on dry land and three 
under irrigation. 

With cereals, forage crops and in horticulture variety tests were con- 
ducted under both concStions and considerable data of value were gathered in 
connection with duty of water. 

Experimental Station, Lacombe, Alberta 

The crop year here was remarkably good, owing to abundant moisture, 
warm weather and an ideal harvest season. 

With horses breeding work has been continued here for a number of years 
with the Clydesdale, while during the year pure-bred Shires were added, creat- 
ing a great deal of interest in the district. These latter animals were the gift 
of the Sliire Horse Association of Great Britain. With beef cattle, the Aber- 
deen Angus is kept, and during the year a number of prizes were obtained. 

With dain,' cattle tlie Holstein is the breed kept, the herd now totalling 
sixty-five head. Fourteen pure-bred Holsteins gave an average of 15,737 
pounds of milk and 65.1 pounds of butter for the year. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 19 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

With sheep a gradinp: up experiment is heins carried on, using pure-bred 
Leicester sheep, Ciicviot, Corriedale, Oxford, Hampshire and Siiropsiiire rams 
on range ewes. The good results of this work arc already becoming evident. 

With s^\^nc, the Yorkshires, Berkshircs and Duroc-Jerscys have so far 
been kept, but the last named is being discarded. The object' of the work is 
the production of the bacon type of hog and the Duroc-Jersey does not seem 
capable of producing this. 

In field husbandry- there are now thirteen rotations under test, together 
with a large number of cultural experiments and soil moisture yields requiring 
some 480 plots in all. 

The season was ideal for horticulture, but the vegetables and bush fruits 
yielded well. The native Manitoba plums produced a fair crop, but none of 
the other recently planted tree fruits have come into bearing. With cereals 
and forage crops the usual test of variety work was conducted. 

W^ith poultry. White Wyandottes and Barred Rocks are the two breeds 
kept. All the hens were trapnested and a start was made in pedigree work. 

To meet the increased interest in beekeeping in central Alberta special 
attention was given to this work and considerable information acquired. 

During the year the Superintendent and his assistant addressed forty-two 
farmers' meetings and ^\Totc a large number of articles for the press, while 
an exhibition was taken to some ten fairs. 

Experimental St.vtion, Summerland, B.C. 

The season of 1923 throughout the Okanagan was favourable both tb 
agriculture and horticulture. Good weather prevailed during harvest periods 
and there was no severe weather until the end of December. 

With live stock, a commencement has been made with Cheviot sheep 
and Berkshire swine, while a small Jersey herd has been established. The 
horses on hand are used for farm work only, no experimental work being 
attempted. 

Horticulture, of course, is a main feature of the work at this Station and 
special attention is given to the study of orchard soil problems and to experi- 
ments in the storage of apples, the lattier with a special view to the efficiency 
of common or air-cooled storage as a means of prolonging the life of the apple. 

In field husbandry, a seven-year rotation has been put under way. With 
cereals and forage crops, variety and strain tests were continued. 

Twelve Illustration Stations located in the central and southern interior of 
British Columbia are administered directly by the superintendent. 

The Station attended three local fairs with exhibits during the year, and 
a number of addresses were given to farmers' meetings by the superintendent 
and his assistants. 

EXPERIMENT.\L STATION, InVERMEKE, B.C. 

The season was mild with abundant precipitation and hence good crop 
j'ields. 

In animal husbandry very little experimental work was attempted owing 
to lack of land. However, a start was made in establishing a herd of Ayrshires 
by acquiring some good females and a young bull. Yorkshire swine are also 
kept on the Station. 

In field husbandry-, foiu* rotations are being conducted at the Station 
with a view to maintaining soil fertility and adaptability to farming practices 
throughout tlie district. Variety tests with cereals, forage crops, and horticul- 
ture were conducted, along with cultural experiments with the latter, especially 
with potatoes. 

16—21 



20 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICVLTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

The work \\\i\\ poultry is proving very successful and pedigree trap-nestinq; 
is followed with both Wyandot'tt's and Leghorns. In the apiary, six colonies 
came through the winter ami during the season 502 pwunds of honey were 
extracted. 

The Station exhibit was shown at eight points and the Superintendent 
delivered a number of addresses during the year. No building operations were 
undertaken. 

EXI'ERIMENT.UL F.\RM, Ag.\SSIZ, B.C. 

The spring of 1923 w;>.s one of tlie earliest on record but was rather uncer- 
tain and was followeil by drought and heat. Early sowm crops, however, gave 
an excellent yield and one of the best crops of hay gro^\-n in the district was 
han^ested in July. 

The Clydesdales are kept and bred at the Station and the eighteen head 
of purebreds again made an excellent sho^^■ing at New Wstmin-st'er. The dairy 
herd consists of seventy-four head of pure-bred Holstcins. Twenty-seven cows 
finished their lactation period during the year with an average of 12,371 pounds 
of milk and 540 pounds of butterfat. A larger output than ever w;i.s made of 
Stilton, cream, Cheshire and Meilleur cheese, and a large number of milk and 
cream samples were tested for the farmers of the district. Approximately one 
hundred breeding ewes mostly of the Dorset breed were on hand, and Yorkshire 
swine are the breed kept. 

The popularity and success of the work in poultrj- increases each year, 
the Barred Plymouth Rock and the White Leghorn breeds being kept. A con- 
siderable amount of experimental work in breeding and feeding was done and 
the 3rd Egg Laying Contest was conducte<l and was even more successful than 
either of the other two. The average jx^rccntage of eggs for 360 birds was 
199.85; the best indi\-idual, a White Wyandott*^, laid 306 eggs. 

Work with field crops is limited by the amount of land for this work, and 
most of this was devoted to production of corn and sunflowers for ensilage and 
for hay and root*. 

The work in iiorticulture consisted of variety experiments with potatoes, 
vegetables, fruits and flowers, and also cultural methods. The season was «o 
dry that yields in general were below the average. 

Experimental St.\tion, SiDNEi', B.C. 

The winter of 1922-23 was cold and unusually disagreeable, but on the 
whole the following growing season was a good one permitting of planting 
under excellent conditions with a fair amount of moisture during the growing 
season, 

A small herd of Jersey dairj' cattle has been established and placed under 
accreditation. No experimental work was done with horses or with sheep. 

In field husbandry, tlie rotations outlinetl in the previous report have been 
followed but are handicapped by the high price of land and diflBculty in clearing 
the same. Tests of varieties were conducted with cereals and forage crops, 
both witii winter and fall seeding. 

Horticulture is made a specialty at this Station, and a large number of 
experiments were conducted in soil treatment, pruning, spraying, fertilizing, 
variety tests, etc. 

Poultrj' is also featured, and probably at no other Station is wider work 
being carried on or more accurate results obtained. A complete system of 
pcdigrceing is followed and a laying contest for poultrj- breeders of the Island 
is being conducted. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 21 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

The Wdi-k with lices is also a feature and forms a valuable source of 
information for Island bee keepers. 

Several fall fairs were attended at which an exhibit of Station produce 
was made and addresses and demonstrations given. A large number of visitors 
visited the Station during the year. 

Experimental Sub-stations 

As in former years, experimental work was conducted at Fort Vermilion 
and at Bcaverlodge in the Peace River district and a certain amount of experi- 
mental work with tree fruits especially at Salmon Arm, B.C. A limited amount 
of experimental \york also was conducted under the supervision of the Fathers 
of the Mi.ssions at Forts Smith, Resolution and Providence, Northwest Terri- 
tories, at Swede Creek, near Dawson, Y.T., and at Betsiamites, Saguenay 
county, Que. 

From the first-named two points excellent results were obtained. The work 
at Salmon Arm, being with newer varieties of apples, is necessarily slow in 
conclusion. The work at Forts Smith, Resolution and Providence was greatly 
hampered by a very unfavourable season, that of Betsiamites was hindered 
somewhat by a change of priests in charge of the mission. The work here is 
also preparatory in nature dealing largely with problems of soil fertility, and 
considering the condition of the land, excellent progress is being made. At 
Swede Creek for the second year in succession wheat grown on the Station 
was made into flour which created a great deal of local interest. 



DAIRY AND COLD STORAGE BRANCH 

The record for the dairy season of 1923 presents no very striking features. 
Weather conditions were about normal, except in certain areas. The production 
of cheese shows an increase of over 15,000,000 pounds in excess of the previous 
year, although the complete figures arc not yet available. There was also an 
increase in the production of creamery butter of over 8,000,000 pounds, in 
spite of the fact that a much larger quantity of cream was exported to the 
United States than during the previous year. 

The average price of cheese for the season was a little over nineteen cents 
per pound at country points. This price is nearly 50 per cent higher than tiie 
average price in any pre-war year, including that of 1914, when the price in 
the autumn was raised considerably by war conditions. It is doubtful if the 
price of any other Canadian farm product has been so well maintained since 
the war period. 

The average price of butter for the season of 1923 has been placed at 33-4 
cents per pound at country' points, and was, therefore, relatively lower than 
the price of cheese throughout the season. With cheese at 19 cents, the eciuiva- 
lent for butter is 41^ cents, excluding the difference in value of the skimmilk 
and whey. The disparity between butter and cheese was never as great as at 
times during the past season. The prices were more on a parity towards the 
end of the season. 

On the whole, the dairj-man in 1923 was in a better position than tliosc 
who depend on other crops. 

The total exports of dairy produce for the calendar year, plus excess of 
holdings, show an increase in fat equivalent of 1,733,532 pounds as compared 
with 1922, while the value of the exports, plus excess holdings for the same 
period, shows an increase of $5,215,818. 



22 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

The most outstanding feature of the dair>' situation in Canada at the 
present moment is the strong tendency towards dairying in the prairie provinces. 

Recognizing the importance of the competition which Canada is meeting 
from New Zealand and Australia, it was decided to send Mr. J. A. Ruddick, 
Dairj' and Cold Storage Commissioner, and Mr. W. A. Wilson, then Manager of 
the Saskatchewan Co-operative Creameries, on a visit to these countries to study 
the conditions and methods which are followed there, and to report on the pros- 
pects of further competition from that source. They left Canada on Januarv 
26, 1923, and returned on April 21, 1923. The Dairy and Cold Storage Com"- 
missioncr prepared a full report of the trip, which was published as bulletin 34, 
and whicli may he obtained on application to the Publications Branch of this 
department. Tiiis report points out very clearly the urgent need for Canadian 
dairj-men to take advantage of every opportunity for improvement if they are 
to successfully meet the ever growing competition from the southern hemisphere. 

Mr. G. H. Barr, who has been on the staff of the Dairy Branch for seven- 
teen years, and Chief of the Dairj' Division since 1909, resigned his position 
at the end of Februarj'' and left the service, with a good record behind him. 

Reorg.\nization 

The Dairy Branch has recently been somewhat reorganized. A beginning 
was made in the creation of a Division of Dairy Research, and Mr. E. G. 
Hood, B.S.A., Ph.D., was appointed to the position of Chief of the Division. 
It is hoped that this division may be helpful in solving some of the problems 
which butter and cheese makers have to contend with from time to time. 

In order to deal with the large increase of work involved in the grading 
of dairj' produce since the Dairj' Produce Act and Regulations came into 
force on April 1, 1923, a new "Division of Dairy Produce" has been estab- 
lished. This division will deal with grading, educational scoring contests, 
grading classes, judging at exhibitions, etc. The Dairy Division has been 
renamed " Division of Dairy Manufactures ". It will iiave to do with all 
activities of the Branch relating to the manufacture of butter, cheese, and other 
dairy products, the operation of the government dairy stations, etc. The Cold 
Storage Division has been merged with the Extension of Markets Division, 
which will hereafter be known as the " Division of Dairy Markets and Cold 
Storage ". The administration of dairj' laws, which has been under the Exten- 
sion of Markets Division, will be disassociated from that division and the work 
carried on as a separate " Service ". 

The cow testing work which has been carried on by the Dairy and Cold 
Storage Branch since it was first started in 1904, has, by mutual arrangement, 
been transferred to the Live Stock Branch. It has been felt for some time 
that the Dairy Branch did not have the requisite machinery and organization 
for carrying on this work to best advantage, and the Dairy and Cold Storage 
Commissioner has frequently asked to be relieved of it. The Live Stock Branch 
is in closer touch with the live stock owners of the country. The transfer was 
made on March 31, 1924. 

Cre.\m Grading 

There is a very general movement throughout the provinces towards the 
grading of cream for butter making. Cream grading is now well established in 
Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Nova Scotia, and a good start has been 
made in Ontario and Quebec. While the grading of cream is a matter which 
come^ under the jurisdiction of the provincial authorities, the Dairj* Branch 
has assisted in every possible way to introduce this important reform in the 
creamery industry, and to co-ordinate provincial effort along this line. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 



23 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 



Extension of Markets Division 

The iced car services for butter and cheese were again arranged for with 
the railways, and supervised by the inspectors under this Division. 

The cargo inspectors were employed as usual at Montreal during the season 
of navigation, at Halifax througliout the year, and at the ports of St. Jolin, 
N.B., and Portland, Me., after the close of navigation at Montreal until the 
end of Januarj- when tlie shipment of perishable product? practically ceased. 

Inspectors are still stationed in the United Kingdom at the ports of London, 
Bristol, Liverpool, Manchester, and Glasgow. Thus cargoes of perishable pro- 
ducts are inspected as to condition, temperature, packing, etc., both at the 
point of loading and at the point of discharge. Detailed reports are made on 
every shipment, and recording thermometers are placed with all such cargo, 
the records of wiiich, along with other information contained in the reports, 
are made available to all interested persons. 



Dairy Division 
the grading of daikv produce 

The Dairy Produce Act and Regulations came into force on April 1, 1923. 
Some preliminary grading was done in 1922, mainly for the United Dairymen 
Co-operative, an organization selling cheese by auction at Montreal. The 
following quantities of cheese and butter were graded during the calendar 
year of 1923:— 

CHEESE- ALL CANADA 



Province 


Number 
Boxes 


Per cent 
Specials 


Per cent 
First 


Per cent 
Second 


Per cent 
Third 




909,227 

53.3,151 

15.751 


0-9 
1-2 


830 
680 
62-4 


14-2 
281 
37-1 


1-9 




2-7 




0-5 








Total 


1,458,129 


0-97 
14,173 


77-03 
1,123,157 


19-78 
288,338 


2-22 




32,461 







BUTTER— ALL CANADA 
Pasteurized 



Province 


Number 
Packages 


Per cent 
Specials 


Per cent 
First 


Per cent 
Second 


Per cent 
Third 




39.074 
50,961 
12,403 
15.479 
91,. 572 
1,044 


17-3 
61 


68-9 
49-3 
780 
66- 1 
53-5 
96-3 


12-8 
38-6 
21-8 
24-1 
8-7 
3-7 


10 




60 




0-2 


Ontario 


4-8 
37-2 


50 




0-6 












Total 


210,533 


21-2 
44,582 


57-8 
121.856 


18-7 
39,239 


2-3 




4,856 









U.NPASTEUKIZED 



Province 


Number 
Packages 


Per cent 
Specials 


Per cent 
First 


Per cent 
Second 


Per cent 
Third 




4,441 

263,786 

3.762 




8-0 
640 
46-1 


56 
33-7 
45 1 


360 






2-3 






8-8 








Total 


271.989 




62-8 
170,668 


34-2 

93.2.39 


30 






8,082 











24 DEPARTMEXT OF AGRICILTIRE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Montreal is naturally the principal centre for the grading of dairy produce 
for export, and the bulk of the grading is done tliere. A Dominion Dairy 
Produce Grader was stationed at Belleville for central Ontario, one at Stratford 
for western Ontario, and one at Charlottetown for Prince Edward Island. An 
arrangement was made with the provincial departments of agriculture for 
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta, to have the provincial graders act as 
dominion dairy produce graders as required for the grading of butter intended 
for export. 

No attempt was made to place any marks on the butter or cheese package^ 
indicating the grade in which the respective lots had been placed. The grade 
certificates have served in some measure to identify graded lots through the 
churning numbers and vat numbers entered in the certificate. Amended regu- 
lations now provide for the marking of grades on the packages, and although 
there are serious practical difSculties in the way of carrying out this marking. 
it is believed to be desirable that it should be done, and it is hoped that some 
way will be found of doing it. 

The export trade in dairy produce from Canada has been long established 
and the method of handling, the arrangements of warehouses, etc., have become 
firmly fixed. It was felt to be undesirable to introduce any system tiiat would 
cause serious dislocation or interruption to the established practices unless there 
were good reasons for doing so. In grafting the grading system on the export 
trade the department has endeavoured to permit the handling of dairj- produce 
along the usual lines as far as possible, and to accommodate the grading system 
to existing conditions with a minimum of disturbance. It may be necessary 
in the interests of the trade and to protect the grading so as to establish con- 
fidence therein, to make some changes in the future. On the whole the grading 
of dairy produce for export has been inaugurated with verj- little difficulty 
and without friction with either the exporters or the producers. 

REGISTRATION OF F.\CTORIES 

The registration of all cheese factories and creameries, which has now been 
carried out, and the requirement that after -May 1, 1924, all packages con- 
taining butter and cheese shall bear the registered number of the factory, will 
greatly assist in the identification of different lots of butter and cheese, and 
enable the dairy produce graders and others to correspond more effectively 
with the authorized representatives of the different factories. 

MILK UTILIZ.\TION SERVICE 

This service was strengthened during the past year by the addition of 
an assistant demonstrator and lecturer who speaks French as well as English. 
A large number of publications on the use of milk and its products were 
distributed through provincial organizations. Boards of Health, Departments 
of Education, Child Welfare Associations, etc. 

Exhibits and booths, where the food value of milk products was demon- 
strated, were erected at eiglit of the leading agricultural exhibitions in Canada 
during the past year, and also at the Exposition of Western Canada Farm 
Products promoted by the T. Eaton Company at Winnipeg. 

Addresses have been given by the Demonstrators at the World's Dairy 
Congress at Syracuse, at various national, provincial and local meetings of 
women's institutes, child welfare organizations, educational associations, dair\-- 
men's associations, and at nine of the noniial schools in Ontario and Quebec. 



REPORT OF THE MIXISTER 25 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

Some work lias been done in tlic public schools by encouraging milk poster 
competitions, and a close connection has been established with the various 
child welfare, public health, women's institutes and other organizations through- 
out Canada. 

FIXCH D.^IRY STATION 

The Finch Dairj- Station had another successful year. Over eight million 
pounds of milk were received, making it the largest whole milk cheese and 
butter factory- in Canada. There was manufactured 148,479 pounds of cheese, 
and 20,302 pounds of butter while 210,579 pounds of butter fat were sold as 
cream, and 107,156 pounds of whole milk were disposed of. The total value 
was S149.598.14. The average net payment to the patrons was $1.62 per 100 
pounds of milk. The quantity of milk receivc<l during the four winter months, 
December to March inclusive, 1922-23, was 1,731,869 pounds. In the same 
period in 1912-13 (first year of operation) the receipt's were only 208,937 
pounds. 

DOMINION EDrCATI0X.\L BVTTER SCORING CONTEST 

The etlucational butter scoring contests, in wliich samples of butter from 
creameries selected by the provincial authorities in the different provinces 
are sent to Montreal once a month throughout the season, was repeated in 1923. 

An educational cheese scoring contest along the same lines was inaugurated 
in 1923 and created considerable interest among the cheese factories. 

The objects of these contests are to secure uniformity in type and character 
of the butter and cheese manufactured in different parts of Canada. It has 
been demonstratetl through this work that just as good butter can be made in 
one part of the countn,' as another, and that it is possible for cver>- part of 
Canada to make the very highest grade of creamerj' butter. The cheese con- 
test was naturally confined very largely to Ontario and Quebec, with a few 
samples from New Brun^^wick and Prince Edward Island. 

DAIRY NEWS LETTER 

Pul)lication of the monthly Dair\- News Letter was continued. This pub- 
lications affords a medium through which information as to world's conditions 
in dairj-ing. the progress of the industry in Canada, and any items of interest 
to those engaged in the manufacture of butter and cheese in Canada can be 
disscniinatf-d promptly and directly to those who are especially interested. 

DAIRY M.VRKET INTELLIGENCE 

A weekly Dair>- Market Letter is mailed every Monday to every creamen- 
and cheese factorj' in Canada and to any other person who makes application 
to be placed on the mailing list'. This letter is publishetl only from April to 
December. 

In addition to the Market Letter, paid telegrams are sent out regularly on 
Mondays and Fridays to officials in the various pro\-inces and districts, and 
collect telegrams arc sent to any person who makes application for them. 

This market information seems to be appreciated by creameries and 
cheese factories, especially in outlying parts of the count'r>-. 



26 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
MEETINGS 

The commissioner and the staff of the Dairy and Cold Storage Branch 
have attended numerous dairy conventions and other meetings throughout the 
year. Some special meetings were held during the winter to which cheese makers 
and factory operators were invited with a view of becoming familiar with the 
methods and standards followed in the grading of dairy produce. A number 
of the dairy produce graders were assigned to this work and samples of cheese 
of different types and grades were taken along for examination by those in 
attendance. 



HEALTH OF ANIMALS' BRANCH 

In this branch the year just passed has been a busy one, although fortun- 
ately the extra pressure has not been due to any serious or wide spread out- 
breaks of disease within our borders. 

Unfortunately, very serious outbreaks of foot and mouth disease have 
been occurring in Great Britain with dangerous regularity for some time, and 
quite recently this disease has been detected in the State of California, the 
infection ha^^ng been introduced from foreign sources through the port of San 
Francisco. 

It has been necessary to prohibit tlie importation of cattle, sheep, goats, 
swine, poultry-, and dogs, with the exception of toy dogs, from Great Britain 
and Ireland. 

The British Ministry having placed an embargo upon the importation of 
cattle, sheep, goats and swine from all the StatJes of the Union, it was further 
necessary, in order to protect our British market, to enforce a similar order. 
As it is essential to protect the reputation of Canadian animals, the transit 
shipment of American animals through Canadian territory has been prohibited, 
as well as the transit of Canadian animals through the United States. 

More stringent measures are being enforced with regard to the infected 
State of California, and its two bordering States, Nevada and Oregon. The 
importation of cattle, sheep, swine, goats, dogs and poultr\', or of the flesh, 
hides, horns, hoofs, or other parts of such animals, or of hay, straw, fodder, or 
manure originating in, or which have been within, any of these three States 
has also been absolutely prohibited. 

Foot and mouth disease is one of the most contagious of all known maladies, 
and one transmissible to a remarkable degree by indirect' channels of many 
different kinds. There is consequently always a danger of the infection being 
introduced, and this is very much enhanced when this disease exists in the 
United States. 

The enormous losses resulting from an invasion of this disease are well 
known, and while the enforcement of precautionary measures cause a great 
deal of annoyance, inconvenience and financial loss to importers, and others, 
these losses are infinitesimal when compared with those resulting from an 
invasion of the disease. It has therefore been incumbent upon the department 
to enforce absolutely all possible precautionar\- measures. 

The commendable promptness and energj' with which the initial outbreaks 
were dealt with by the American authorities will, I hope, result in the early 
eradication of the disease. 

The British regulations governing the shipment of Canadian stores, which 
have been in force since the removal of tlie embargo on April 1, 1923, have 
been carefully complied with. A close supervision has been maintained over 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 27 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

all shipments from point of origin to the British market. This has necessitated 
the sending of approximately sixty veterinary inspectors to England whose 
services were not available for their regular duties for periods varying from 
six weeks tb two montiis. Approximately 28,500 stores left our shores for the 
British niarkcl during the period covered by thi.s report, and all these animals 
passed the rigid inspection for health conducted by the British officers. 

Although the supervision of these shipments entailed a great deal of 
additional work, what may be termed the ordinary duties of the staff, namely 
the work of controlling animal diseases with a v^iew to their ultimate eradication, 
that of maintaining a strict quarantine against the introduction of infection 
from other countries, and that of research and experiment have all been carried 
on in a satisfactory and effective manner. The details of the work performed 
in these various lines are briefly dealt with below, and will be found fully set 
forth in the report of the Veterinary Director General, which will be issued 
as a separate publication. 

It has not been found necessary in the past year to erect any new quaran- 
tine stations, nor have any changes been made in the quarantine regulations, 
except, of course, those above outlined. These are temporary measures, and 
will be rescinded as soon as it is safe to do so. 

The compulsory slaughter and compensation policy which has been followed 
for many years in dealing with outbreaks of glanders has practically eradicated 
this ver.- serious disease of horses. Outbreaks occur occasionally, but they 
have in recent years been very limited, and have been promptly controlled. 
During the past year only one outbreak was dealt witli, and this was located 
in the province of Quebec. 

A similar policy has been followed in the control of hog ciiolcra with 
marked success. The system of inspection of licensed garbage feeders has 
resulted in prompt notification of this disease, which has made it possible to 
deal more promptly with outbreaks. 

Small outbreaks have occurred in the Provinces of Ontario, Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan and British Columbia, which necessitated a total slaughter of 
581 iiogs. 

The control of bovme tuberculosis is a most difficult problem largely due 
to the chronic tendency of this disease. It is not possible to detect this malady 
by physical examination, except in ver>- advanced cases. The great majority 
of infected cattle show no signs of illness, and it is only by the administering 
of the tuberculin test that they can be detected. Compulsory regulatory 
measures are therefore impracticable, and it has been necessary to exercise 
caution in selecting policies for its control. As however, it is essential to protect 
our foreign markets in countries where active measures are being carried on, 
and realizing the great economic losses resulting from bovine tuberculosis, as 
well as the humanitarian aspect of this disease, it is advisable to take all pos- 
sible, practicable measures for its control. 

In view, however, of the enormous cost involved this work must necessarily 
be limited, and it is important that only those policies are selected which give 
the best returns for the money expended. 

Experience having shown that under the provisions of the Mimicipal Tuber- 
culosis Order, satisfactory progress was not being made in the control of this 
disease, it was decided tiiat the department would not be justified in accepting 
any more applications for assistance under this order. 

As, however, a large number of applications had been received, an oppor- 
tunity was given to the municipalities in which the testing of cattle had not been 
commenced to apply for assistance under the Restricted Area plan, but they did 
not see fit to take advantage of it. 



28 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

The policy of eradicating this disease in pure bred herds, and maintaining 
them free from it, known as the Accredited Herd plan, is giving good results, 
and is becoming very popular in districts where the stock men arc most familiar 
with it. It was, however, necessary, in order to limit this plan to pure bred 
herds, to require that there should be a definite number of registered cattle in 
the herd before accepting it for accreditation. This number was at first placed 
at twelve, and as it practically eliminated the many owners of small herds who 
desired to take advantage of this policy, it was afterwards decided to accept 
herds containing at least five registered cattle, one of which must be a herd sire. 

Under this plan 2,648 pure-bred herds are now being dealt with and 908 of 
these herds have already been fully accredited as tuberculosis free herd*. It 
was necessary to conduct 119,551 tuberculin tests, and 7,153 cattle were found 
to be tuberculous, necessitating the payment of S539,414.66 in compensation. 

This plan is most popular in districts where the stockmen are most familiar 
with it, and although everj^ effort is being made to deal promptly with all 
applications for accreditation, they have been too numerous to permit of immedi- 
ate action in all cases. 

The Restricted Area plan has many advantages over other tuberculosif 
policies, in so far as under the regulations governing this plan all cattle of all 
classes located within a specified territory are tested with tuberculin as often 
as is considered necessary, and diseased animals slaughtered. It is therefore 
possible by careful organization to carry out the testing of cattle in the most 
expeditious and economical manner. It is further possible to destroy all infected 
centres, and in this way to provide a clean area for the healthy herds. 

All reasonal)lc measures arc taken to maintain such an area free from infec- 
tion. Cattle coming into this area, except for transit through the area, or for 
immediate slaughter in the area, must first pass a tuberculin test conducted by 
one of the department's officers. Those for transit through the area must be 
unloaded for feeding purposes at special designated points, where they cannot 
come in contact with the area cattle, and the same conditions apply to those for 
immediate slaughter within the area. 

An area in Manitoba comprising three townships in the Carman district is 
,being dealt with under this plan. The first test was commenced on February 1. 
1923, and a total of 16,550 cattle were submitted to tuberculin; 918 of these 
reacted, or 5 57 per cent, necessitating the payment of §32,830 in compensation. 
^11 herds from which reactors had been removed were retested after a period of 
60 days elapsed. There were 344 of these herds, which contained 5.990 cattle, 
and 97 animals reacted, or 1-6 per cent. These animals were slaughtered, the 
premises disinfected, and $3,128 paid in compensation. 

The second general test of all cattle in this area was completed in October 
last. There were 15,600 cattle in the area at this test, and 87 of the^e reacted, 
or -55 per cent, for which $3,154 was paid in compensation. 

These figures show that it is possible to eliminate the greatest number of 
diseased cattle at the first test, and that with the continued support of the stock- 
men infection will be ultimately eradicated from this area. It will, however, 
require the utmost vigilance and perseverance to maintain this area free from 
tuberculosis. 

The supervised plan for the eradication of this disease is still available to 
stock-owners who cannot take advantage of the other policies. Under this plan 
no compensation is paid, but the Department places at the disposal of the owner 
the services and advice of its veterinary officers free of charge. Ever>- effort is 
made to clean up such herds expeditiously, and in the best interests of the 
owner, and to maintain such herds free from tuberculosis. 

More trouble has again been experienced with mange in cattle, the largest 
mmiber of outbreaks occurring in the Prairie Provinces. 



RKl'OHT OF THE MIXISTEli 29 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

Althougli the (iisca^e was dctcM'tcni in not more than 414 animals, it has been 
noces-ary to quarantine for treatment as contacts 39.234 cattle. Experience liar- 
shown that it is essential, in order to control this disease, to quarantine and 
treat all cattle which may have been in contact with infected herds. 

Unfortunately the large majority of stock men do not thoroughly appreciate 
the great importance of promptly notifying the department's officers at any time 
they detect skin irritation in their cattle. Practically all of these cases during 
this period have been discovered by officers of the department, and in many 
instances it has been found that animals had been shipped from infected herds 
to other districts, and also to other provinces. 

This has necessitated a great amount of investigational work, and caused 
unsu.specting purchasers much trouble, expense, and annoyance. It is, in view 
of our export trade, most important to control this disease, as if mange is 
found in Canadian cattle in our foreign markets, this trade will be promptly 
terminated. It is, therefore, highly essential that stockmen in their own interests, 
as well as those of our live stock in general, should notify the Department 
immediately they observe any symptoms of this disease in their cattle, or those 
of others. 

All infected and contact animals have been quarantined, and are being 
treated under supervision as expeditiou-^ly as circumstances will permit. 

Mange in horses has not at any time been prevalent in Canada, but outbreaks 
of this disease have not been uncommon during the past year. The majority of 
these outbreaks occurred in the provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. A 
total of 61 horses were found to be actually affected, requiring the treatment 
of 483 contact horses in addition to the infected ones. 

Sheep scab has only been detected in the provinces of Alberta and British 
Columbia; three outbreaks having been dealt with in the former province, and 
one in the latter. All infected and contact sheep, numbering 21,497 animals, 
have been quarantined, and are undergoing treatment under supervision. 
, Rabies and dourine, two very serious diseases of live stock, have not been 
detected in this country during the period covered by this report, while only one 
outbreak of Anthrax has been dealt with, and this occurred in the province of 
Quebec. 

Careful and systematic supervision has been maintained over the stock- 
yards throughout this country, and they have been cleansed and disinfected, as 
well a~ all stock cars, at frequent intervals. 

PaTHOLOGIC.\L DIVIS.TOX 

This division has accomplished a vast amount of laboratory routine work 
and has engaged in special investigation and research to the utmost limitations 
of existing laboratory* accommoilation and equipment. Five laboratories arc 
maintained under this division, the main one being located in Ottawa, with 
the Chief Pathologist in charge. 

BIOLOGIC.U, LABOR.\TORY, OTT.\W.\ 

The manufacture and preparation of tuberculin, mallein, and other biological 
products has continued throughout the year and with an increasing demand 
and supply. 

Tuberculin. — 637.596 doses of tuberculin, as required for the subcutaneous, 
intradermal and oplrthalmic tests, have been issued, being an increase of 155,494 
over the previous year. This tuberculin is distributed throughout Canada for 
use in Government testing for tuberculosis. 



30 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Mallein. — 10,860 closes were issued for use by veterinary inspectors for the 
diagnosis of glanders in horses. 

Anti-abortion Vaccine. — 133 doses were issued for the experimental treat- 
ment of infectious bovine abortion. 

Disease Diagnosis and Laboratory Examinations. — Cadavers, pathological 
specimens, parasites, samples of blood, serum, milk, meat, canned foods, etc.. 
have been received from Government inspectors, practising veterinarians, farmers 
and live stock owners, 1,213 of such specimens have been reported on, an 
increase of 557 over the previous year. 

Special Investigations and Research. — Losses, diseases and problems affect- 
ing live stock are investigated by the pathologists co-operating with veterin- 
arians, Experimental Farm oflBcials and the owners concerned. 

Museum Specimens. — A collection of pathological specimens has been 
exliibitcd at various places in the provinces of Ontario and Quebec lor educa- 
tional and public health purposes. This exhibit has attracted much favourable 
comment and several requests have been received for similar sets of specimens, 
which, unfortunately, we are imable to meet. 

EE.SE.\RCH ST.\T10N, HULL, QUEBEC 

At this station, continuous research on tuberculosis is carried on. 

The study of immunity reactions in tuberculous animals ha? enabled the 
pathologists to set up a new method for the standardization of tuberculin, which 
was very urgently needed in view of the importance and wide appplication of 
tuberculin testing of cattle in the Accredited Herd Plan. 

Various strains of tubercle bacilli, originating from the cattle, buffalo, swine 
and poultry, are maintained and the different properties and characteristics of 
each are under investigation. 

Some preliminary experimental work has been done on tuberculosis vaccina- 
tion and immunization, with encouraging results. 

Improvements have been made in the test known as the " Complement 
Fixation Test " — a blood serum reaction which can be applied for the detection 
of tuberculosis infection. 

Blood and milk tests of herds of cattle in which infectious bovine abortion 
exists have been made and recorded. It is intended to repeat these tests 
annually, or oftener, and to study the relationship between reacting cattle and 
the continuance of infection. 

The Research Station, by an arrangement between my department and the 
Research Council, maintains an experimental " Fox Ranch " for the study of the 
nutritional problems of foxes in captivity. 

VETERINABY RESEARCH STATION, LETHBRIDGE, ALTA. 

A study has been made on the biology of the parasites causing sarcoptic 
mange in cattle. 

The investigation of Swamp Fever in horses has been continued furtlier. 

Routine serological tests for Dourine have been made, all with negative 
•results. Although this disease appears to have been completely eradicated, it 
is considered advisable to make occasional tests as a precaution against a 
possible recurrence. 

One hundred and seventeen specimens have been received for laboratorj- 
examination, diagnosis and report. 

A patiiologist of this division attended the slaughter of surplus buffalo at 
Wainwright Park, which afforded an excellent opportunity for a study of patho- 
logical conditions and parasitical infestations. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 31 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

VETERIN.^RY RESEARCH STATION, AGASSIZ, B.C. 

The results of the investigation of the disease locally known under different 
names, such as " Timber Paralysis of Sheep " and " Kamloops Cattle Disease " 
strongly indicate that the condition is caused by eating the plant " Astragalus 
Campestris ". 

Further experiments have been made in connection with the poisoning of 
stock bj- eating bracken. 

Serological tests are made and data collected with regard to Infectious 
Abortion of Cattle. 

The study of Red Water of cattle in British Columbia continues. 

The causes of losses among live stock are investigated by the pathologist 
from time to time. A large number of specimens are received for diagnosis 
and report. Piroplasmosis was detected in Indian deer imported from the Orient 
and held in quarantine at Vancouver. 

FOX RESE.\RCH STATION, CH.ARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. 

One of the chief problems in raising foxes in captivity is parasitical 
infestation. A collection and study of the various parasites affecting these 
animals has been made and many experiments undertaken on methods of 
prevention and treatment. Very good results have been obtained where the 
methods advised have been applied. 

Other pathological conditions affecting foxes, particularly distemper, nutri- 
tional disorders and the causes of premature birth, have received attention. 

Five hundred and thirty-three specimens have been sent to the laboratory 
for diagnosis and laboratory report, many of these specimens being carcasses of 
foxes dying from unknown causes. 

PUBLICATIONS, MEETINGS, ETC. 

Members of the staff of the Pathological Division have contributed many 
articles to the agricultural press, fox farming magazines and scientific journals, 
and have distributed in this way much valuable information. Papers have 
been read and addresses given at various meetings throughout the country. 

Meat and Canned Foods Division 

During the year just closed, a larger volume of work was carried on by 
the officers of this division due. in most part, to a substantial increase in the 
number of meat food animals sent forward to the inspected establishments for 
slaughter. This increase was made up through a steady fonvarding to the 
market rather than by a sudden rush in the fall, as has been too often the case 
in the past. Tiiis condition was. no doubt, influenced by the fine weather and 
good pasture during the late months, together with an abundant supply of 
winter feed and grain. The increase was principally in hogs, which show 
approximately 420,000 over the year pre-vious. Cattle and sheep show a com- 
bined decrease of approximately 1.50.000. 

The prices paid to the producers have not been as remunerative as desired 
due to the slow demand in our foreign markets. Canadian bacon in England 
has begun to re-establish itself, and larger quantities of select bacon have been 
sent forward. 

Very close examinations have been given during slaughter and cure, and 
the inspectors have been in a position, at all times, to guarantee absolutely the 
wholesomeness and freedom from disease of all meats and meat food products 
emanating from establishments operating under the provisions of the Meat and 



32 DEPAKTMESr OF AGlilCULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Canned Foods Act and Regulations. Sanitan- conditions of a liigh order in 
these plants liave been maintained. Structural change.*, additions and new 
modem equipment have been supplied whenever requiretl, with the result that 
tliese plants will compare favourably with the plants engaged in similar work 
in other countries. 

Some new establishments were placed imder inspection during the year, 
and by the enquiries being made regarding inspection and export trade, it is 
safe to presume that more will be operating under the Act during the coming 
year. 

The people are slowly awakening to tihe question of public health and are 
beginning to paj-^ special attention to their food supply. They have learned 
that no matter how anxious they may be, they are not able to protect them- 
selves, and depend more and more upon public officials to safeguard the health- 
fulnc-ss of the foods consumed by themselves and tliose dependent upon them. 
This is showing itself in the increased demand in Canada for Government 
Inspected meats. This is also the first requisite from our foreign customers. 
Our complete system of inspection and the final certification are such that their 
exacting demands are fully met. It is felt that during the coming year we 
may look fonvard with confidence to an increased activity in the inspected 
slaughtering establishments, as it would appear that there is an increased pro- 
duction of meat food animals, which is essential to the development of agri- 
culture in Canada. 

Full and complete statistics covering the work will be published later in 
the report of the Veterinary Director General. These figures will show no 
great change from those issued in previous years, other than the increase previ- 
ously mentioned. Tuberculosis and injuries such as bruises, cripples, etc., 
account for the greater amount of condemnations and loss. With reference to 
the former, it is confidently expected that this vnW decrease as the present 
policy of control and eradication is exlcndcd. As to the latter, it could be 
immediately reduced, if those, entrusted vr\th the handling and shipping of live 
stock from the time they leave the farm until they reach the slaughter house, 
were alive to their responsibility and posesssed even normal intelligence regard- 
ing the care which should be given diunb animals. 

The establishments engaged in canning fruits and vegetai)les had a fairly 
successful year. In some few of the products, there was a light run. On the 
whole however, there was an average pack. Prices for tiie finished articles 
were well maintained. This with a considerable export trade has resulted in a 
brisk movement of this class of foods, which has enabled the manufacturer 
practically to empty his plants. This condition should stimulate increased 
activity during the coming year. If we are favoured with a good season for 
gro\ving this class of foods, the canners will undoubtedly be ready to take 
care of all that is offered. The sanitary conditions of the plants were kept 
up to a satisfactory standard. New equipment is being constantly added 
and with a continuance of the present co-operation, this phase of the work 
will steadily improve with the result that producer, manufacturer, and con- 
sumer will benefit to the extent, that it will become a very safe stable industry, 
from wiiich tlie pessimism and uncertainty of the past will have entirely dis- 
apjK'ared. 

^Material progress has been made in the quality of the products prepared. 
The different processors are lending themselves to a more thorough under- 
standing and observance of the standards. The only formation upon wliich 
this industry can be built is to meet foreign competition, and establish itself 
at home or abroad. Every assistance is being given in interpreting these 
requirements, so that tliere may be uniformity in their methods of application 



REPOIiT OF THE MINISTER 33 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

in order that the declaration of quality on these products carries tlie same 
meaning and guarantee, irrespective of geographical location or the individual 
establishment in which they were manufactured. 

The activity in the evaporating of fruits was sectional. Many of these plants 
in Ontario did not operate during the past year, owing to a short apple crop and 
an uncertainty of the export market, while those in the Annapolis Valley in 
Nova Scotia ran longer than usual and were fortunate in being able to market 
their products on a rising market, wliich developed as the season advanced. 
Improvement in the control of sanitation, equipment and construction of these 
plants has been, if anything, more noticeable than in any of those under the 
control of the department. The products also show an equal advance, yet it 
would appear that as the new process of dehydration is developed and perfected, 
it will displace many of the older methods of preparation such as evaporating 
and sun drying, as the finished product obtained by dehydration is of exception- 
ally fine appearance and at once appeals to the housewife as a clean, wholesome 
and convenient food. 

A splendid export trade is being developed in condensed, evaporated and 
dried milks. Our manufacturers have been able to meet readily the conditions 
imposed by our foreign customers and arc manufacturing a really high class 
food. No criticism can be made as to plant equipment or cleanliness, as they are 
managed to meet the most exacting requirements. 



LIVE STOCK BRANCH 
Horse DmsioN 

The fiscal year of 1923-24 showed considerable improvement in the horse 
breeding industry. The demand for big drafters at good prices, for city work 
continued. Bush horses, during the lumber season were also in greater demand 
than for some years past. Farm horses sold steadily throughout the year, par- 
ticularly in Eastern Canada. A few years ago thousands of horses were shipped 
to the western provinces annually. Now the tide has turned and some ten 
thousand western horses found a market last year in Ontario, Quebec, and the 
Maritime Provinces. The starting of this movement to ship horses eastward 
has been credited, and rightly so, to officers of the Horse Division, of the Live 
Stock Branch. 

There is another class of horse for which there is a steadily growing market 
both in Canada and the United States; that is for a horse that can be used for 
riding and hunting purposes. There are at the present time some sixty-five 
hunt clubs in Canada and the United States, while the cities, and even small 
towns have riding clubs; in fact in some of the larger cities there are as many 
as eight or ten clubs with hundreds of members. Canadian bred saddlers and 
hunters have always found favour south of the line, and never more so than at 
the present time. Good grocn saddlers and hunters are picked up wherever 
they can be secured, the trouble at the present time being that the demand far 
exceeds the supply. The kind most soucht after are the big strong horses of 
type and quality up to carr^'ing heavy weicht. Such horses are also suitable for 
delivery, fire, police and remount work. They also make excellent farm horses. 
Canadian polo ponies, particularly those bred in the Calgary countrj' are also 
finding a good market at remunerative prices. 

The outlook for horse breeding has improved greatly during the past year, 
particularly in the western provinces. Economic conditions are really forcing 
people to use the cheapest form of power, whether it be on the farm, in the 
16—3 



34 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

lumber woods, or in the city, and this is supplied by horses. Hence it is, that 
the horse men are again taking up breeding seriously, knowing that there is 
bound to be a steadily increasing demand particularly as the countn,' returns to 
normal conditions. 

There are three types of horse which are finding a ready market; big 
drafters, weigliing at least seventeen or eighteen hundred pounds and upwards; 
clean legged delivery and express horses, weighing from thirteen to fourteen 
hundred pounds, that can step along at a fair gait and good saddlers and hunters 
of which there is a decided shortage. Depending on conditions, these are the three 
types that should be bred at the present time. 

CLL'BS 

There was a fair increase in the number of clubs operating under the 
Federal Assistance Policy in 1923 and much more interest was displayed in 
the horse industry during the year particularly in the western provinces. The 
policy of making grants to clubs that hire approved stallions has now been 
in existence for nine years and has done much to encourage our breeders to 
carry on even under unfavourable circumstances. During the war years when 
the prices of all other classes of live stock doubled and trebled, the prices of 
horses were practically cut in two. In fact, it would scarcelj' be said for a 
few years that there was a market. To this might be added tlie use of trucks 
and tractors, which, for the time being, replaced to a considerable extent horses, 
not only in the cities, but on the farms. Under the changed economic condi- 
tions of the last two or three years horses are steadily but surely coming back 
and the demand to-day is greater than it has been for a number of years. 
Knowing that with the return to normal conditions, horses will be again in 
keen demand, the wide awake horsemen are raising colts for the coming market 
and the club system is particularly popular in tiie western provinces. This 
policy, which has been commended both by Canadian breeders and foreign 
horsemen, is undoubtedly the only one of its kind in existence at the present 
time, whereby the owners of mares as well as the proprietors of good stallions 
are protected. The former arc enabled to secure the servics of first class 
horses at a very nominal fee, while the latter are assured by contract of a 
certain definite sum for the year's work. Thus, private individuals are able 
to keep good stallions without loss to themselves, while community breeding, 
better feeding, and up-to-date care and management are encouraged amongst 
the mare owners. 

There is another phase of this question which is quite evident, namely, 
that members of clubs use only their good, sound, young mares for breeding 
purposes and take better care of tiicm. On the other hand, the stallion owner 
being guaranteed a definite number of mares for the season is able to spread 
the season's work over the whole period and thus not over breed his horse 
during any week. The use of better marcs, together with a sane system of 
mating, car and management, is leaving a higher percentage of good sound, 
strong, healthy colts, than was ever possible under the ordinary system. 

Tiie organization of communities for the purpose of hiring the best stallions 
available is helpful in many ways. In the first place, there is the fostering of 
the community spirit of working together and of helping one another. Secondly, 
under club organization, it is possible to hold colt shows, horse sales and engage 
in other work for the promotion of the horse industry-. The club system has 
also created a healthy rivalrj' between district-s, in that each club is anxious 
to secure tiie bc^t stallion possible and thus a premium is set on the good horses. 
The use of good stallions of the same breed for a number of years results in 
the rapid grading up of the horses of the district, which in turn advertises the 
community and attracts outside buyers. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 35 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

Another point which cannot be too strongly emphasized in connection with 
the club scheme is the fact that all stallions hired by clubs must pass a rigid 
inspection by an experienced officer of the Live Stock Branch. Accordingly, 
only sound, individually excellent animals that possess size and the character- 
istics of the breed are allowed to stand for service in a club. In this way the 
breeder, whether he be a capable horse judge or not is given double protection 
when he uses a club horse. The Live Stock Branch has steadily and persistently 
eliminated the stallions that were not up to a high standard. In fact, a few 
years ago, as high as twenty per cent of the horses hired by clubs were rejected 
after inspection. During the last couple of years, however, not over three per 
cent have been refused on account of being unsound, or otherwise not up to the 
standard required. In this way, club members are being educated, as naturally 
when a stallion is thrown out by inspection, it leads the club members to inquire 
the cause. 

By steadily raising the standard and by eliminating all the unsound horses 
as well as undersized stallions that while sound possess such bad conformation 
that they should not be used for service, good results are slowly but never- 
theless surely being produced. Stallion owners to-day do not hesitate to say 
that only the good ones are wanted. Accordingly, importers when buying 
have ever before them the fact that in order to sell they must import only the 
good ones. 

BREEDING ST.\TIONS 

The first Breeding Station was started in 1921 with the idea of seeing what 
might be done in the production of saddlers and hunters, delivery, and remount 
horses. Some investigation has shown that there was a demand for horses of 
this type. This demand has steadily grown and to-day it is impossible to 
supply the number wanted, owing to the shortage of this type of horse. 

At the present time, four Stations are in operation: one at Reddick Lake, 
Que.; a second at Chaffey's Locks, Ont. ; a third at Millarville, Alberta, and a 
fourth at Ailsa Craig, Ont. At each of these Stations, three approved Thorough- 
bred stallions stood for service last year. In each case the stallions were well 
patronized; two of the stallions served in the neighbourhood of one hundred 
mares each, while the lowest number served by any one of the twelve horses 
was sixty. 

The steady demand for saddlers and hunters, both from our Canadian cities 
and from the United States has done much to revive the interest in this class 
of horse and to make it profitable as well. The stallions used at the various 
stations are good specimens of the Thoroughbred and suitable for producing 
high class saddlers and hunter and other useful horses of that type. As an 
intance of the effect of Thoroughbred blood in grading up with the ordinary 
mares of the country, the following may be cited: One of the stallions at 
Chaffey's Locks, that had been imported from Britain the year before, was 
bred to sixty mares and left thirty-five colts. The officer who inspected them 
reported that they were the most uniform lot that it had ever been his pleasure 
to look over. They showed very strongly the characteristics of the sire and 
looked as if they had at least two crosses of Thoroughbred blood in their 
veins. The similarity of type between colts sired by the various horses and 
also the marked characteristics of the Thoroughbred are readily noticeable and 
has been frequently remarked upon in the various districts, where these stations 
are located. 

Last year, colt shows in connection with the stations were held at Reddick 
Lake, Chaffey's Locks and Millarville. In each case there was a splendid 
exhibit brouglit out which aroused the keenest competition amongst the 
exhibitors. In each case the countryside attended the show. In one place the 

16— 3 i 



36 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

attendance was over 2,000 although it was held miles from even a village. The 
holding of these shows is doing two things: on the one hand, it is educating 
breeders in the feeding, care and management of their colts, as well as making 
them judges of the type of horse they are raising; on the other hand, it is 
advertising the district as a breeding centre and drawing outside buyers wlio are 
ready to pick up good prospects at fair prices. In one district at least all 
saleable animals have been picked up and many more could have been sold if 
they had been available. 

SILVER BLACK FOXES 

The Silver Black Fox industry of Canada had, all things considered, a very 
successful year. It is true, that owning to the exceedingly hea\y snow fall in the 
Maritime Provinces, the conditions for mating and the raising of foxes, was 
anything but favourable; nevertheless, the final results showed a fair pup crop, 
and an improved market. From Prince Edward Island alone, approximately 
4,000 live foxes were shipped, of which over 3,400 were exported. The pelt 
market, although somewhat slow in the early part of the fur season, picked up 
wonderfully around the beginning of the new year, and later fur sales showed an 
improvement of fifty per cent in price for the better class of pelts. Tliis revival 
of the pelt industry has also had a beneficial influence on the live fox trade and 
present conditions point to even better things for the coming year. 

During the inspection season, which began about the middle of September 
and ended the middle of January, in the neighbourhood of 10,000 foxes were 
inspected, tattoed in the ears for identification and duly registered in the office 
of the Canadian National Live Stock Records. This brings the number of regis- 
tered foxes, to date, to over 20,000, and preparations are being made for the 
inspection of even a larger number during the coming year. The inspection of 
foxes and their registration by the Canadian National Records, is having a verj- 
beneficial effect. The fact that beginners, by buying recorded foxes, are assured 
of getting animals of fair quality, and that have been bred true to type for a 
number of generations, has done much to stabilize the industry' and put it upon 
a sound fin.'mcial basis. 

During the year inquiries have been received from many sections of Canada 
and various parts of the United States asking as to the future of the silver fox 
industry. In reply it has been pointed out that there is not only a steady but 
increasing demand for furs, but on the other hand the supply from the wilds, 
particularly of the higher priced furs, is diminishing, hence as the years go by 
there must needs be a steady growth of the raising of these fur bearing animals 
jn captivity. The silver fox pelt has long been known as the " Golden Pelt of 
the Fur Industry," in that it is the highest priced fur on the market, and as it 
cannot be successfully imitated, it is bound to continue to hold the premier place, 
and to be worn by the people who can best afford to pay the high prices which 
it has always commanded. 

FUR F.^HMINO 

The raising of various kinds of fur bearing animals in captivity, although 
carried on by a few individuals for a number of years is still in more or less of 
an experimental stage. At the present time there are some thirty mink, seventeen 
raccoon, twelve skunk and eight muskrat ranches in various parts of Canada. 
Beaver, marten, fisher and rabbits are also being raised by a few people in 
different parts of the country. It is too early to predict what will be the final 
outcome of fur farming, but judging by the large number of inquiries received 
during the past year, it is evident that it is attracting a very considerable amount 
of attention at the present time. One thing certain, however, is that furs are 
steadily growing in popularity, not only for the warmth they supply during the 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 37 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

cold winter months, but also for summer wear. As the number of some of the 
higher priced animals at least, is evidently decreasing in tiic wilds, it is reasonable 
to assume that the raising of them in captivity will be profitable and as time goes 
on will be engaged in more and more, particularly as the Canadian climate is 
suitable and there is much land well adapted to fur raising. 

C.\TTLE Division 

ENCOUR.\GEMENT OF WINTER FEEDING 

During the past two years, the Live Stock Branch has been steadily pro- 
moting increased winter feeding of beef cattle and has been working out a 
programme designed to give greater permanence and stability to this phase 
of the cattle industrj' . 

The policy of the branch in this respect is based on the principle that a 
relatively low initial cost of feeder cattle is an essential factor in making this 
business a profitable one. For many years, winter feeding of cattle has been 
carried on more or less extensively in several counties in western Ontario, and 
the system of farming followecf in that part of the province lends itself to this 
practice. Under existing conditions as regards land values and general over- 
liead ex-penses, however, feeder cattle cannot be raised at a low cost in the 
majority of these districts. In the grain growing areas in Western Canada, an 
immense quantity of feed is available annually, much of which is practically 
valueless unless fed to cattle. Here again, feeder cattle cannot be raised at a 
low cost and as is tke case in Western Ontario, finishing of cattle on an 
increased scale can be developed only by providing a steady and adequate 
supply of well bred feeder cattle which have been produced at a minimum 
cost. 

It is an accepted fact that range areas are the logical breeding ground for 
the production of feeder cattle under low overhead cost. It is also well known 
that none of our commercial cattle are better bred than those which come from 
the range, which for j-ears have consistently used only pure bred bulls. It is 
essential, therefore, that the remnant of our ranching industn,' should be safe- 
guarded, extended and moulded so as to make it a permanent and dependable 
source of supply for high grade young feeder cattle to be finished in grain 
growing districts in Western Canada and in feeding areas in Ontario. The 
branch is doing everj^thing possible to impress the importance of this question 
upon the public mind. 

The development of such a policy will naturally involve considerable 
change in practice on the part of many ranchers. Instead of carrying their 
steers until three or four years of age and selling them off the grass as over- 
weight and frequently only half-finished beef at a period of the year when 
the market is usually at its lowest point, it wll be necessary for them to feed 
their calves during the first and possibly their second winters and put them 
on the market as yearlings or two year olds. Under favourable conditions, an 
expanding demand for range bred calves may even be developed, thereby 
facilitating an annual turnover. 

During the past year, this policy has been widely discussed with ranchers 
in both Alberta and Saskatchewan by officers of the Branch and has received 
very general acceptance even by old timers in the business. The waste of 
good material in the present ranching practice is fully realized by ranchmen, 
and if a profitable outlet for young range steers can be developed, they have 
expressed themselves as fully prepared to remodel their business in order to 
take advantage of it. 



38 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

The proposal has an additional appeal to ranchers in that the elimination 
of three and four year old steers from the range will make possible a gradual 
increase of tlie stock. This will naturally result in an increase in the annual 
output as regards numbers from each hend and on the basis of prices received 
during recent years for grass finished range cattle, should also result in increased 
annual net profits. 

A preliminary step in making this policy efTcctive was taken in 1923 in 
organizing and supporting feeder shows and sales at Calgary, Moose Jaw and 
Winnipeg. Approximately 90 per cent of the cattle which were entered in these 
events were range bred steers. Practically all of these cattle had been dehorned 
as calves and this fact, combined with their uniformity, breediness and general 
evidence of quality and tliriftiness, made them very attractive to buyers. 

BULL LOANING POLICY 

Under this policy which was inaugurated in 1913 the Live Stock Branch 
has purchased and loaned over 4,000 bulls to farmers' associations in different 
parts of the country where pure-bred sires would not otherwise have been 
available. 

The majority of the bulls loaned have given a good account of themselves 
and have not only effected a marked improvement in tlie quality of the cattle 
in the districts in which they have stood but have also impressed many farmers 
with the value of improved blood to the extent of inducing them to purchase 
pure-bred sires for their own use. 

In purcliasing bulls the aim has been to encourage the breeders who are 
producing worth while commercial bulls and for this reason the majority of 
the bulls secured in recent years have been bought at large consignment sales 
where support could be given to a maximum degree and in a public way to 
the better class of bulls offered. 

The bulls owTied by the branch are retained in sen-ice as long as they 
continue to give satisfaction. Discarded bulls are sold for beef and the pro- 
ceeds from the sale of such bulls has returned a large percentage of the amount 
originally invested in them. 

SIRE PURCH.\SE POLICY 

In the spring of 1921 the branch inaugurated the above policy with a 
view to encouraging a more extensive use of properly selected sires and of 
providing an agency through which farmers could secure such sires with the 
least possible exTiense and difficulty. 

Under the terms of this policy the branch is prepared to fill orders for bulls, 
boars and rams under certain conditions. An applicant is required to deposit 
a percentage of the purchase price with his order. The sire when secured is 
shipped to him on approval. If no complaint regarding the animal is made 
within three days after delivery the balance of the purchase price becomes due. 

A considerable number of bulls have been purchased under the terms of 
this policy for farmers who are not in touch with breeders and who are so 
situated that they could not start out to purchase for themselves without run- 
ning up travelling ex-pense bills out of proportion to the amount of the invest- 
ment involvcti. The general terms of the policy have also been used to good 
advantage in handling bulls tlirough exchange stables in Ontario and in pur- 
chasing bulls for the live stock improvement trains which operated in Mani- 
toba in 1922 and 1923 and in Ontario in 1923. In tlie latter cases the bulls 
were not purchased on order but were bought outright and exposed for sale at 
the original cost price plus freight and maintenance charges. Any bulls which 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

were not resold wore utilized in connection v\nth the Loaning Policy. In the 
past three years xipwards of 350 bulls have been sold to farmers under the 
terms of this policy. 

SCRUB BULL C.\MP.«GN' IN ONT.\RIO 

For three seasons the branch has co-operated with the Ontario Department 
of Agriculture and the Ontario Live Stock Improvement Committee in eradi- 
cating the scrub bull from a number of selected counties throughout the province. 
An officer of the branch has devoted practically all his time to this work and 
has assisted agricultural representatives in several counties in tlie organization 
and carrying on of their campaigns. 

In the spring of 1923 the Live Stock Improvement Committee arranged 
with the Railway Companies for the running of a better live stock train through- 
out the province. This train commenced its itinerary on March 1 and in the 
course of the next two months covered the greater part of the province. A 
number of carefully selected bulls were offered for sale from this train and in all 
twenty-seven head were disposed of. These bulls were purchasd in advance by 
the branch and any that were left on hand at the end of the trip were used in 
connection with the Bull Loaning Policy. 

A grant of S2,500 was again made to the Improvement Committee for 
advertising purposes which amount was supplemented by an equivalent amount 
by the provincial department. 

C.\R LOT POLICY 

Under this policy the Live Stock Branch pays reasonable travelling expenses 
of farmers residing in Canada who purchase stock at central stockyards to be 
returned to country points. In Eastern Canada the assistance rendered is con- 
fined to purchases of female breeding stock, cattle, sheep or hogs. In Western 
Canada the policy covers stocker and feeder cattle in addition to breeding stock. 
Purchasers have to fulfil certain requirements of the department in connection 
with their shipments and to give satisfactory assurance that none of the stock 
is being purchased for speculative purposes. 

The cost to the department of all cattle shipped under the terms of this 
policy during the period of three years averaged 59 cents per head. The average 
cost of all sheep shipped during the same period was slightly over 18 cents per 
head. 

This policy has proven very valuable as an educational agency in that its 
terms have encouraged farmers from different parts of the country to visit stock- 
yards and to become acquainted with methods of doing business at these points 
and has unquestionably played a very important part in encouraging the return 
of unfinished cattle and sheep to country points for further feeding and also in 
the return of young female breeding stock, particularly from yards in Western 
Canada. 

CAR LOT SHIPMENTS TO DECEMBER 31, 1923 



Year 


Steers 


Heifers 


Sheep 


1916 (3 months) 


6,203 
11.334 
20,703 
22.190 
14.009 
8,599 
5,681 
9,970 


3,113 
10.411 
18,745 
17,. 5.50 
7,9.57 
7.659 
4.897 
6.. 538 


1,407 


1917 


1.800 


1918 


7.978 


1919 


9.408 


1920 


6.317 


1921 


9,968 


1922 


3.121 


1923 


6.603 






Total 


98,994 


76,870 


46,601 







DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



FREE FREIGHT POLICY 



15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



In co-operation with the Railway Companies of Canada the Live Stock 
Branch inaugurated the Free Freight Policy in the fall of 1917. the aim being to 
prevent as far as possible the slaughter or exportation of useful heifers, young 
ewes and young sows offered for sale on the open market at central stockyard?. 
Under this policy the Live Stock Branch pays 75 per cent of the freight charges 
on such shipments, the remaining 25 per cent being rebated by the railway 
companies. 

During the time the policy has been in operation shipments under its terms 
from the different yards up to December 31, 1923, number as follows: — 



Name of Yard 


Heifers 


Ewes 


Sows 




27.356 

38,401 

27,822 

185 

558 

2,8.W 

193 


10,295 

56,484 

11,644 

160 

^O.TO 

19,484 

452 


156 




207 




459 




40 












11 








97,365 


99,549 


S73 







Shipments for the twelve months ending December 31, 1923, were: 8,666 
heifers, 16,127 ewes, and 200 sows. 

boys' breeding club policy 

The policy has been in operation for only two seasons but the constructive 
work already accomplished under its terms has been the subject of much 
favourable comment, particularly in Quebec and the Maritime P^o^nnces. It 
has stimulated an interest on the part of farm boys in breeding, feeding and 
showing good cattle. The competitive feature introduced has encouraged the 
proper development of the calves and the keeping of exact records of the cost of 
production of the original heifers supplied. Incidentally the boys have been 
givn a great deal of training in live stock judging and have learned the 
importance of maintaining the proper balance between individuality and pro- 
duction capacity in appraising breeding stock. The clubs already established 
are gradually developing into small breeding centres and are the means of pro- 
moting the principle of community breeding. 

GET OF BVLL COMPETITIONS 

Under this policy which was inaugurated in the spring of 1923 the branch 
has assisted a limited number of agricultural societies in financing special classes 
at their exhibitions based on a unit of free yearling progeny of one pure-bred 
bull. The branch has paid 50 per cent of the prize money awarded 
in the competitions, the remainder of the money being raised by the 
society. Tlic number of competitions assisted during the past year was definitely 
limited in advance and it was also specified that the grant from the Branch to 
any competition would in no case exceed $100. The object of these competitions 
is to advertise good sires in the district and to encourage the proper development 
of their progeny. It has not been required, therefore, that all the animals 
entered under one group should belong to one owner. The policy is being used 
to good effect in encouraging members of associations to which bulls have been 
loaned by the Branch to give more care to their young stock and to bring them 
out as a "demonstration as to what improved blood means to a district. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 41 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

RECORD OF PERFORMANCE 

Although some breeders were of the opinion that the regulations which 
became effective April 1, 1923, would very considerably reduce the number of 
places where testing was being carried on, the Record of Performance has during 
the past year continued to increase both in number of farms to be visited and 
in the number of cows under test per fann. A few breeders have, however, 
withdrawn their herds owing to their disinclination to comply with the following 
new regulation which eliminates the possibility of testing only one or two 
outstanding cows in a herd: — 

" Every owner making application for entry of a cow must agree to enter in the test 
all normal, untested, milking, pure bred cows in his herd which freshen during the period 
that such cow is under test. The acceptance of an application for the entry of a cow will 
not bind the Department to continue the supervision of the test in the event of a change 
of omiership unless the new owner complies with the above requirement. (In the case of 
Shorthorn and Red Polled breeds ' milking ' in the above clause wall be interpreted as 
meaning 'hand or machine milked'.)" 

At the present time there are upwards of seventy more farms being visited 
by our inspectors than at the same date last year, an increase of ten per cent. 
During the past eight months the number of cows under test has increased 
thirteen per cent. 

Following is a brief summary of the year's work: — 

NL'MBER OF COWS ENTERED FOR THE TEST 

Ayrshire 1,281 

Brown Swiss 12 

French Canadian 128 

Guernsey 131 

Holstein-Fricsian 1 , 685 

Jersey 1,055 

Red Poll 38 

Shorthorn 405 

Total .* 4,735 

NUMBER OF RECORD OF PERFORMAN"CE CERTIFICATES ISSUED 

Cows Bulls 

AjTshire. 413 18 

Brown Swiss 4 

French Canadian 34 1 

Guernsey 47 1 

Holstein-Fricsian 648 35 

Jersey 423 19 

Red Poll 16 

Shorthorn 201 8 



Totals 1 , 



TOTAL NUMBER OF CERTIFICATES ISSUED SINCE THE COMMENCEMENT 
OF THE RECORD OF PERFORMANCE 

Cows Bulls 

Ayrshire 2, 965 126 

Brown Swiss 4 

French Canadian 170 5 

Guernsey 191 7 

Holstein-Fricsian 3,863 179 

Jersey 1,731 64 

Red Poll 28 1 

Shorthorn 860 22 

Totals 9.812 404 



42 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 george v, a. 1925 
Poultry Di\ision 

Notwithstanding the somewhat lower level of prices for poultry products 
in 1923 as compared with 1922, it is noteworthy the frequent expression that is 
heard on the part of the farminc; public in many parts of the country that the 
poultry is one of the most profitable lines of activity which they have on the 
farm. This condition is most evident in the increasinK number of requests 
received for information in reference to poultry, the number of people who are 
contemplating specializing in poultry-keeping as a business, and the general 
desire for most up-to-date information apparent at all points where poultry 
meetings are held. 

Possibly one of the most significant things that has occurred in a poultry 
way in Canada was the holding in Ottawa in August last of the annual con- 
vention of the American Association of Poultry Instructors and Investigators. 
Not only was there a wide representation from the faculties of the different 
United States Agricultural Colleges and E.xpcrimcnt Stations, but also several 
of the most prominent men in poultry work in Great Britain, among them being 
the British Poultry Commissioner, Mr. Francis, and the President of the Inter- 
national Association of Instructors and Investigators in Poultry Husbandry', Mr. 
Edward Brown, F.L.S. While no attempt was made to enlarge unduly upon 
Canadian policies for the advancement of the poultry industry, yet it was very 
evident tliat not only representatives from the United States but more par- 
ticularly from Great Britain were very much impressed with the nature and 
scope of the policies evolved by Canada, particular mention being made of the 
standardization of eggs, and the Record of Performance for Poultry, two develop- 
ments in which Canada stands pre-eminent and alone among the nations of 
the world. 

ADMINISTR.\TION AXD ENFORCEMENT OF THE EGG REGrL.\TIONS 

The feature of principal interest during the year in connection with the 
egg regulations was the introduction of amendments covering domestic trading, 
provided for under the revision of the " Live Stock and Live Stocks Products 
Act " at the last session of the House. These amendments simply gave effect 
to the principle which has already been in vogue as covering export and inter- 
provincial shipments for a period of five years with provisions whereby the 
utility of grading would be more apparent to both producer and consumer. 

Following the date of becoming effective in July last, the first two months 
or more were devoted almost entirely to the explanation of these regulations, 
first in meetings arranged by country shippers in different parts of the country 
and, later, by detailed inspection work and explanation among retailers in the 
larger centres. 

There is no one among consumers but who desires a prime quality egg. 
The whole policy underlying these regulations is to devise some way wiiereby 
the consumer may have an opportunity to express his preference for quality 
through the medium of standardized legal grades, the intention with regard to 
legislation being simply to provide that minimum of legislation necessary to 
make these grades effective. 

From the producers' standpoint, the object has been to introduce a system 
of trading whereby the benefit of the consumers' preference for quality may find 
its way back to the producers through the medium of a price differential. 

For years Canadian farmers had been losing annually a large sum of money 
through the marketing of large numbers of bad eggs and eggs of inferior quality. 
Tliis loss was not only the loss from eggs unfit for food but the conilition 
apparent had a decidedly adverse effect on consumption. The condition of 
marketing was largely the result of the " flat rate " or " case count system " 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 43 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

of purrhasing whereby eggs were bought by number witliout regard to quality. 
The " r;^^:e count system ", wliere prartiood, not only proves decidedly unfair 
to the farmers and other producers who have taken pains to market good, clean, 
fresh eggs, but in reality in many instances through placing no premium what- 
ever on good eggs actually formed an incentive to the continuance of careless 
and dilatory methods not only in the gathering and marketing of eggs on the 
farm but in tlie holding and general care of eggs by country merchants and 
other first receivers. 

Some producers argue that the " case count system " of purchase is advan- 
tageous to themselves in that they receive the same price for eggs sometimes 
known to be of inferior quality as they do for eggs of good quality, to say 
nothing of those that are bad and unfit for food. In this, however, they are 
mistaken, for the wholesale dealers and others who purchase the eggs know 
very well what the loss of shrinkage is in eggs at certain seasons, and in order 
to safeguard themselves, simply set the price for all eggs at a safe level to 
themselves. 

No more significant statement with respect to the utility of these regula- 
tions has come to the Department's attention than the remark of one egg 
merchant from western Ontario at the recent convention of wholesale egg 
merchants held in Montreal. Some criticism of the regulations was being 
made bj* certain members of the wholesale trade, this criticism very largely 
turning on the requirement for a graded return to the producer. The egg 
merchant in question rose in his place and stated that no matter what the 
Government or the wholesale trade might do with regard to requirement for 
a graded return, he would have to continue the system in his district for the 
simple reason that the producers who supplied him with eggs had come to 
realize the advantage to themselves of payment on grade; that they themselves 
are making closer and closer selections from their own eggs, keeping those of 
questionable quality, small, and dirty, at home, marketing only the best, and 
that he was satisfied that if he were to stop, the people of his district would 
take the matter into their own hands, organize egg circles, and carry on on 
the graded basis. 

One object of the broad policy for egg trade improvement, of which the 
regulations form a part, is increased consumption of eggs. Canada's home market 
for eggs is her largest market, and while every effort is being made to extend the 
export outlet for eggs, yet the home market has long been more or less overlooked. 
While it may be too early as yet to draw any final conclusions from the opera- 
tion of this policy, particularly since the regulations affecting domestic trading 
went into effect, the indications are that during the last six months of 1923 egg 
consumption per capita in Canada reached the highest point yet attained. No 
doubt the lessened cost to consumers has been a large contributing factor, but 
cost alone will not suffice to promote the consumption of an article if the quality 
.is not good. There is no doubt that since the regulations became effective egg 
.handlers generally throughout Canada have paid more attention not only to 
quality but to the despatch and general efficiency with which the eggs have been 
handled from producer to consumer. 

In addition to domestic trading, the egg regulations also provide for inspec- 
tion by approval at point of shipment, of export shipments in lots of 25 cases or 
more; interpro\'incial shipments in lots of 100 cases or more; and all eggs 
imported into Canada for domestic consumption. Tn addition, on request in 
which inspectors are located, certain number of inspections are made on local 
shipments, that is, shipments going from one point to another point within the 
same province. The total number inspections for which certificates were issued 
in the calendar year 1923 was 1,528 as against 1,063 in 1922. During 1923, 
104 inspections were made in which the shipments were not approved for ship- 



44 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

ment as against 83 in 1922. 1,230 inspections of eggs imported for donaestic 
consumption covering 218,148 cases were made during 1923. Of the 440 cars, 
(197,093 cases) of eggs originating in the Prairie Provinces and British Columbia 
for eastern shipment 24,964 cases equalling 56 cars had their origin and were 
inspected in British Columbia; 54,609 cases equalling 121 cars had their origin 
in Alberta; 46,560 cases equalling 105 cars in Saskatchewan; and 70,960 cases 
equalling 158 cars in Manitoba. 

During the six months ending December 31, 1923, since the regulations 
covering domestic trading became effective, upwards of 15,000 inspections and 
visits to retailers have been made. In all, eight prosecutions were undertaken 
during the calendar year, a favorable judgment being obtained in each case. 

EGG AND POULTRY MARKETS INTELLIGENCE 

An increase in the interest on the part of producers and shippers in the 
markets intelligence distributed has been noted during the past year. Requests 
for market reports are being received continually. Practically no change has 
been made during the past year in the system of distributing these reports. 
The two chief mediums of distribution are the weekly egg and poultry markets 
j-eport which is distributed to all parts of Canada by mail and the daily reports 
distributed through the medium of the Canadian press. In addition a daily report 
is issued by mail to points that can be reached over night. The cost of" all this 
service is extremely small and particularly so when considered from the stand- 
point of the benefit derived from the reports by those receiving them. 

Many business houses and co-operative concerns rely almost entirely upon 
this service for special daily and weekly reports. During busy seasons ' collect ' 
messages by wire are sent to many shippers in different parts of Canada. Pre- 
vious to this year this service was confined chiefly to eggs, but with the growing 
importance of the West as a producer of live and dressed poultry it has been 
necessarj' to extend the service to cover poultry. In this connection it was foimd 
necessary' during November and December of last year to secure special reports 
on the poultry markets at Boston, New York and Buffalo in order that the neces- 
sary- information might be sent to those making requests for it. There is no doubt 
that the securing of this information made for very much better prices and more 
intelligent marketing by those shipping poultry particularly from Western 
Canada. 

Cable information received from Great Britain each week has been of con- 
siderable service to exporters, and this service is now being augmented by a 
cable report sent from Ottawa to the British press through Reuters Limited. 

CO-OPERATIVE MARKETING AND POULTRY PROMOTION 

While progress in the development of co-operative marketing of eggs and 
poultry was comparatively slow during the recent years of. high prices, it has 
remained for the somewhat adverse prices of 1923 really to establish the utility 
of co-operative marketing, particularly to those producers less favourably situ- 
ated from the standpoint of markets. 

The result is that co-operative marketing of eggs and poultry' is being 
taken up and discussed in a large, constructive way throughout Canada, and 
the results are already outstanding and evident in a great many provinces. 

In British Columbia the membership of the British Columbia Poultrj'men's 
Co-operative Exchange increased from 610 members on December 31, 1922, to 
1,032 on December 31, 1923, an increase of 422 members. During the year the 
quantity handled was 2,159,610 dozen eggs as against 1,250,000 in 1922. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 45 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

In Alberta as a direct result of the activities of the Egg and Poultry- 
Marketing Service and the field work performed by officers of the Live Stock 
Branch, the matter of an Egg and Poultry Pool, similar in form to the Wheat 
Pool, has been very much to the fore since the close of the egg and poultry 
shipping season, with the result that twelve representative men have been 
appointed to organize and lay the plans for the operation of an extensive egg 
and poultry pool on a contract basis for the coming year in Alberta. 

In Saskatchewan and Manitoba, while the Saskatchewan Co-operative 
Creameries have during the past year operated a small pool in eggs, the most 
active attention has been paid to the co-operative marketing of poultry, more 
particularly turkeys. 

In Ontario the most outstanding development has been in the instance of 
the Oxford County Co-operative. For several years a number of individual 
circles have been operating on an independent basis in Oxford County. Last 
year, encouraged by federal and provincial officers, several of them decided to 
amalgamate and opened up a central candling and grading station in Wood- 
stock. One outstanding feature of their success was their winning of premier 
honours for Colonial eggs at the London Dairy Show in October last. 

The success attained by the Oxford County Co-operative has attracted the 
attention of many other districts in Ontario and was the contributing factor 
which led to tlie lengthy discussion of co-operative marketing of eggs in the 
L'nited Farm Women's Convention held in Toronto in December, the result of 
which has been the action of the United Farmers' Co-operative Company in 
Ontario definitely committing themselves to the operation of an egg pool in 
1924. 

In Quebec the Societe Co-operative Federee has continued its egg and 
poultrj' operation and has become one of the largest, if not the largest, handlers 
of live poultry in the city of Montreal, handling not only carlots originating in 
Quebec, but from the v^estern provinces as well. 

In Nova Scotia and New Brunswick co-operative activities develop slowly, 
although very satisfactory results were obtained from the co-operative market- 
ing of their poultry last fall. New Brunswick obtained possibly the highest 
price for poultry shipped, in the Dominion. 

In Prince Edward Island the P.E.I. Co-operative Egg and Poultry Associa- 
tic^n has largely recovered from the reduction in membership subsequent to the 
failure of Canadian Farm Products and the liabilities which individuals who 
were members of both associations were obliged to meet, the quantity of eggs 
handled by the P.E.I. Co-operative during 1923 bemg well in advance of the 
three-quarter million mark. 

CWRLOT MOVEMENT OF LIVE POULTRY 

During 1923 the carlot movement of live poultry was greatly facilitated by 
the equipment by the Canadian railways of a number of live poultry cars. 
Heretofore it had been necessary to bring in special live poultry transit cars 
from the United States for practically every shipment that was made. The 
availability of Canadian-owned equipment has done much to stimulate this 
trade, the cars being built at the representations of officers of the Live Stock 
Branch. 

The development of live poultry shipments has been most marked in the 
province of Alberta, where not only co-operative enterprise but also private 
enterprise has taken up the movement of poultry by freight. Previously, prac- 
tically all live poultry was moved by express, but with lower prices and 
increasing rates, together with the shrinkage in transit, shippers were literally 
forced to adopt some other method of transportation. 



46 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

The peculiar advantage of carlot movement by freight, to producers, is 
that payment is made at point of shipment and the grading is done at tlie car 
door, in the presence of shipper, wiiereas by express the payment was nearly 
all on a delivered basis and the express and shrinkage were deducted by the 
receiver. 

RECORD OF PERFORMANCE FOR POULTRY 

This policy has to do with the inspection of trap-nested flocks of pure- 
bred poultry on breeders' own plants and the subsequent certification of the 
production recorded. The policy has been in effect since the fall of 1919. The 
record year commences in the fall, entries being received from August until 
December. 

The most striking feature during the past year was the increase in the 
number of breeders entered, 175 entries being received for the record year 
1922-23 as compared with 122 the previous year. 

One hundred and fifty eggs is the number of eggs required for a bird to 
cpialify for Record of Performance certificate; 225 eggs for an Advanced 
certificate; providing each individual bird has laid during an inspection an 
egg weighing 2 ounces or over. 

At tiie anflual convention of the American Association of Instructors and 
Investigators of Poultry Husbandn>' held in Ottawa in August, 1923, the Cana- 
dian policy of Record of Performance for Poultry- was most strongly endorsed. 
Several of the foremost poultry authorities in the United States and England 
were present and during the convention spent considerable time in thoroughly 
going into all details of the policy. These men gave it as tlicir opinion that 
the policy being carried out was one of the most potential factors that had 
come to their attention in the way of national returns from the poultrj' industry 
and particularly in establishing known sources of high producing strains of 
poultry. 

Probably the development of greatest importance during the year is the 
extension of the Record of Performance policy to the approval and banding 
of Record of Performance cockerels, the progeny of qualified females. This 
is a matter which a number of the Record of Performance Associations have 
been urging for some time, as it is felt that once these ibrds have passed a rigid 
inspection and been approved for vigour, type, and freedom from standard 
disqualifications it will do a great deal to stimulate the demand for this class 
of stock. 

EXHIBITS AND PUBLICITY 

Egg and poultry exhibits have been staged during the past year at the 
following large exhibitions and poultry shows: — 

Alberta.— Cixmrose. Calgary, Red Deer, Lethbridge, Edmonton Exhibition, 
Edmonton Winter Fair. 

British Colmnbia.—'Dunca.n, Chilliwack, Vancouver, Victoria, New West- 
minster. 

Saskatchewan. — Regina, Saskatoon, Prince Albert. 

Manitoba. — Brandon, Neepawa, Dauphin, Russell, Carmen, Portage la 
Prairie, Winnipeg, (Eaton's Store.) 

Quebec— Valleyfield, Three Rivers, Sherbrooke, Quebec. 

New Brunswick. — St. John, Woodstock, Fredericton. 

Prince Edward Island. — Charlottetown. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 47 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

Nova Scotia. — Pictou, Antigonish, Sydney, Truro, Kent\dlle, Amherst. 

Ontario. — ^Essex, Windsor, Kitchener, Petrolia, Chatham, London Exhibi- 
tion and Poultrj' Show, Gait, Dundas, Toronto Exhibition and Royal Fair, 
Simcoe, Guelph, Petcrboro, Ottawa Exliibition and Winter Fair, Renfrew, 
Picton Exliibition and Poultiy Show, New Hamburg. 

The standardization and co-operative marketing of eggs and poultry and 
economic production through flock improvement (Recotrd of Performance) are 
the phases of work that have been featured during the past year. Applications 
for literature and requests for exhibits and demonstrations show this means of 
placing the general public in touch with the work of the division continues very 
popular. Since the egg regulations affecting trading in domestic channels came 
into force, the interest of consumers in a graded article has grown very rapidly 
and the demand for candling appliances has been larger than ever. 

Candling demonstrations have been given at many points, many hundreds 
of people taking advantage of these and showing their interest in this phase 
of the work. 

Live birds were again used in connection with the exhibits at the larger 
centres for the purpose of demonstrating good and poor producing sjjecimens. 
Motion pictures have also been a feature at many of the exhibitions during the 
past year, and it is anticipated that this line of work will become a very import- 
ant publicity factor. 

Particular and special phases of the poultn,' work are made the subject 
of press notices. These constitute a verj' valuable and necessary link between 
the department and those interested in the poultry industry. 

Motion Pictuhes 

Motion pictures have been used by the Live Stock Branch during the past 
three years. Projection machines have been distributed to officers of the 
branch in charge of certain districts or provinces. The distribution of pro- 
jectors and films is done entirely from Ottawa; the arranging of meetings at 
which the pictures are to be shown is left in the hands of the district officers. 

Some strictly technical films have been made such as " Demonstrating tTie 
Judging of Hens for Production," " The Co-operative Marketing of Eggs and 
Poultry," and " Eggs and Health." Scenarios are prepared by officers of the 
branch, who also superintend the locating of suitable settings for the pictures, 
the necessarj' properties, etc. 

The programme of the meetings at which these pictures are shown is 
usually arranged to pro\'ide some variety. A short address on the subject of 
the technical films, and one or two scenic films. The latter are also secured 
from the Department of Trade and Commerce, being part of the " Seeing 
Canada " series that is now recei\'ing world-wide distribution. 

The motion picture as a means of actually depicting agriculture in all its 
varied phases is increasing in popularity. Officers of the Live Stock Branch 
repxjrt good results from the use of the pictures and the pictures are in increas- 
ing demand. 

Sheep and Swine Division 
introduction 

The opening of the wool marketing season showed that wools were being 
brought at a substantial advance in prices over the year previous, and the fact 
that' the lamb prices remained steady throughout the season created an increased 



48 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

demand for breeding ewes. At all the stock yards throughout the Dominion, 
any ewes with good mouths were readily picked up for breeding purposes and 
a continued demand indicates that there is a considerable shortage of breeding 
ewes, particularly in the western provinces. There was also a keen demand 
for feeder lambs, both East and West. Range lambs were picked up readily, 
as were fccfi( r lambs of domestic breeding. The price of breeding ewes advanced 
considerably over values of the past two years. A large percentage of ewe 
lambs were retained this fall to replace older ewes and, in many cases, for the 
establishment of new flocks. Sheep have been a very profitable side line on all 
farms and, as a result, farmers are using pure bred rams more extensively, 
following which there is a steady improvement in the quality of lambs marketed. 
The inception of swine grading has given greater confidence and consider- 
able stimulus to the swine industry. During the early part of the year, the 
price of hogs remained steady in comparison with tlie price of feeds, and farmers 
were able to make reasonable profits from raising hogs. These prices, however, 
were higher than export values of bacon justified. During the early summer 
months trade influences were able to bring about a reduction in the price of 
live hogs. This reduction in hog prices established a basis of values compar- 
able to export values of bacon during the summer months. Farmers naturally did 
not take kindly to the lowering of prices and for a time there was a tendency 
to hold hogs for a better market. This naturally resulted in some increase in 
the marketings of heavy hogs and later on, owing to lack of confidence in 
market values, increased the percentage of light unfinished hogs. The new 
level of prices has reduced the farmers' margin of profit to the point where it 
is necessary to exercise the best of judgment in breeding, feeding and manage- 
ment, if he is to make a reasonable profit. Prices for live hogs were fairly 
well maintained throughout the fall months. The bacon market continued to 
drop steadily until it reached the ninety shilling point and, while there were 
minor fluctuations during the winter months, the bacon market became gen- 
erally stabilized at lower values and the price of hogs reacted accordingly. 
Despite the fact that losses in spring litters were high, especially in early 
litters, there have been considerably more swine marketed in 1923 than in 
1922. Tliere has been a steady increase during the year in the percentage of 
select bacon hogs, also a continued demand for improved breeding stock. The 
lowering of market prices will, undoubtedly, check the expansion of the indus- 
try considerably. However, with an abundance of oats, barley, and low grade 
wheat in the country which can still be marketed to advantage by feeding 
hogs, most farmers are accepting the situation as inevitable and are endeavour- 
ing to increase their profits by paying stricter attention to the breeding ot 
hogs of the select bacon grade. 

PURE-BRED RAM PREMIUM POLICY 

Applications under this policy have shown a slight increase during the year. 
This is due largely to ram club organization work in numerous sheep districts 
which have not previously used pure bred rams. The market demand for better 
quality lambs and the increase in the price of wool has helped to revive interest 
in the breeding of better sheep. Sheep raisers who have adhered to the regula- 
tions of the policy with regard to docking and castrating, were handsomely 
rewarded this fall in that they escaped the cut on buck lambs which was imposed 
at the stockyards on lambs marketed after August 27, 1923. The operation of 
this policy very materially increased the sale and demand for pure bred rams 
this fall and the fact that these were procurable at prices in keeping with wool 
and lamb values has enabled grade flock owners to improve their flocks with a 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 49 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

minimum cost to themselves, in fact in many cases, especially where lambs had 
been marketed through the sheep lairs and lamb sales, the added premium has 
in most cases more tlmn offset the initial cost of the ram. 

PURE-BRED RAM CLUBS 

In communities where it is possible to secure a club membership of twenty- 
five or more farmers who desire to purchase a pure-bred ram tiiis Branch permits 
a purchasing delegate to be chosen whose travelling expenses will be paid during 
the time required to purchase the rams. The purchasing delegate is accompan- 
ied by one of tlie Live Stock Branch Promoters who acts in an advisory capacity 
in making the selection. The delegate is responsible entirely for the actual 
financial settlement of all purchases made and the distribution of the rams to 
their owners. The object of this policy is primarily to develop the principle of 
community breeding. One breed only can be purchased by a club. Up to the 
present Quebec is the only province to take advantage of this policy and during 
the last year 829 pure-bred rams were purchased under this arrangement. A 
number of the other provinces have in part applied this policy and developments 
are taking place which will permit of the policy becoming effective in a number 
of the other provinces in future. This policy has been a means of bringing about 
a marked improvement in the quality of commercial lambs in the province of 
Quebec. Lambs now arriving on the Montreal market compare verj' favourably 
in quality with lambs offered for sale on other markets of the Dominion. 

PURE-BRED R.\M GR.\DING 

The policy of grading pure-bred rams was continued during 1923 in the 
provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, 
and Alberta. Under this policy applications by pure-bred breeders are made to 
the provincial departments and an official grader is appointed by this branch 
to visit the flocks and grade the pure-bred rams which the breeders have for 
sale. The outstanding rams are designated a " XXX " grade. Rams of thi^ 
grade must be outstanding individuals of the breed which they represent. The 
second grade is known as " XX " rams. Rams of this category are those con- 
sidered suitable from a commercial point of view to head grade flocks. The 
third grade known as " X " rams are those considered to be inadvisable to breed 
from. These rams are recommended to be slaughtered. Rams arc designated 
according to grade by means of tattoo marks in the ear. A record is kept of 
the number of pure-bred rams graded for each farmer, their grades, and the 
prices which are being asked for them. In some provinces a pamphlet is issued 
by the provincial authorities containing this information in detail. The distri- 
bution of this information has meant more and better sales for the small indi- 
vidual breeder than was heretofore the case, in fact reports received indicate 
that there are practically no graded rams available for purchase in any of the 
provinces. With the possible exception of the Ram Premium Policy this policy 
has been one of the most appreciated of any ever undertaken by this branch 
in connection with sheep. 

SHEEP FAmS AXD LAMB SALES 

The Sheep Fair and Market Lamb Sales Policy of the Dominion Live Stock 
Branch, Sheep Division, culminates commercially, as well as cducatively, the 
various improvement activities related to sheep extension work. For many 
years past farmers have been encouraged to dock and castrate their lambs, buy 
pure-bred rams, dip their flocks, and in other ways practise modern methods of 
16 — 1 



50 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

eheep management. In the raising of sheep, as well as in other things pertaining 
to agriculture, the farmer requires a definite and practical demonstration to con- 
vince him that for such efforts he receives monetary returns not only for the 
cash outlay in the pure-bred rams used, but also for the labour involved. 

In many districts where sheep raising is general it is found possible through 
the operation of the Ram Premium Policy to induce practically all sheep raisers 
to buy pure-bred rams, and, in the organization of these ram clubs, the import- 
ance of deciding on one breed only for each respective community was pointed 
out, with the result that little difficulty was e.xperienced in establishing the use 
of one breed of rams. In such districts where a definite breed improvement 
policy has been adopted and is operative, the Sheep Fair and Lamb Sale provides 
a means whereby sheep raisers in the district can exliibit their lambs for com- 
parison with those of their neighbour. Lambs of uniform breeding that have 
been docked and castrated permit of their being graded advantageously for sale 
purposes, thus enabling farmers to get the premium which improved and well- 
finished stock always brings on the market. 

During the past year fifty-three fairs were held in the Dominion, three in 
Manitoba, three in Ontario, forty-five in Quebec, one in New Brunswick, and 
one in Nova Scotia. At each of these fairs, exhibits consisted of pens of five 
finished market lambs, pens of ten finished market lambs, and a class for a 
pure-bred ram and three ewe lambs of his progeny. The various pens of market 
lambs were judged from a market standpoint and, wherever possible, a packer's 
buyer was secured to assist with the judging. The minimum entry which 
justified a fair was three hundred heatl. Alany of the fairs greatly exceeded 
this number. Victoriaville, Que., had the largest exhibit, with 650 head. The 
second largest exhibit was at the Botsford Fair, New Brunswick, where 615 head 
were exhibited, and the third largest fair was at Arborg. Manitoba, where 530 
head were shown. At all these fairs a total of 15,823 lambs were on exhibition. 

At each fair the judging was followed with keen interest by the exhibitors 
and other farmers who attended. The judges took pains to explain the present 
day requirements of market lambs and in making the awards pointed out to the 
exhibitors the good points of the winning pens as well as the defects in the pens 
which were being placed towards the bottom of the classes. After the various 
pens had been placed by the judges, the lambs were offered for sale. In the organ- 
izing of these fairs, a special sales committee was appointed for each fair. Pre- 
vious to the date of the fair, these sales committees were kept fully advised as to 
the market values for lambs on all competitive markets. At most fairs, the 
eales committee offered the lambs locally by public auction. A good deal of 
publicity was invariably given to the lamb selling feature of the fair with the 
result that local drovers and packers' buyers participated in the bidding. The 
sales committee decided on a minimum sales price and, if the highest bid repre- 
sented full market value, the lambs were sold, otherwise they were loaded on 
cars and shipped to the best available market. When auctioning the lambs 
they were offered with a view to suiting the buyers. The leading prize winning 
pens comprised the first lots and succeeding lots were made up on the basis of 
comparative merit. Lambs which were brought in for sale although not exhibited 
were graded and sold as No. 1. No. 2, or Culls. The highest price obtained for 
lambs at these sales was $12.50 per cwt. The general net price for choice lambs 
ranged from S9.50 to SI 0.85 per cwt. 

A very important feature of these fairs this year was the number of ewe 
lambs purchased by farmers for the establishment of new flocks, as well as t.'he 
ewp lambs of improved breeding retained by sheep raisers to improve their own 
flock. These sheep fairs are. undoubtedly, reviving interest in sheep raising. 
They have materially improved the average prices to the farmer and. through 
added returns, have "convinced farmers that it pays to use a pure-bred ram. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 51 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

They have, furthermore, created a greater knowledge among packers of where 
the best market lambs are produced and, as the fair provides a medium through 
which quality lambs can be purchased in quantity with a minimum of expense, 
the larger lamb buyers are already much interested in this project, which, un- 
doubtedly, combines successful educational and marketing features in a way 
that works out to the general satisfaction of the producer and the buyer. 

Prize money for these fairs is contributed, one-half by the Dominion Live 
Stock Branch, and one-half by the Provincial Departments of Agriculture. At 
many fairs, donations for special prizes were received locally. 

SHEEP FEEDING COMPETITIONS 

These competitions which were begun two years ago in the province of 
Quebec were limited during the past year almost entirely to those sections where 
sheep improvement was being brought about through the organizing of pure-bred 
ram clubs. The purpose of these competitions is to encourage the better care 
of the flock and those other practises which are essential in preparing lambs and 
wool for market. In connection with this policy the branch co-operates with 
the Quebec Department of Agriculture in that 50 per cent of the prize monies 
offered are paid by each department. The maximum prize money for each com- 
petition must not exceed SIOO. Inspectors in making the awards consider the 
buildings, equipment, uniformity of the flock, condition of the ewes and rams, 
feeds and methods of feeding, use of forage crops, weight and quality of wool 
clip, and weight and quality of lambs marketed. In so far as possible, flock 
management and flock improvement were discussed with each farmer who 
entered the competition. Assistance as necessarj', was given in the docking and 
castrating of the lambs and dipping of the lambs and ewes. 

Twenty of these competitions were held in the province and as a result of 
inspections made many flocks have been culled of undersirable ewes, improved 
feeding racks have been built, proper roughages have been grown, and farmers 
will market wool of a superior quality and lambs of a more desirable market 
type. 

SIRE LO.\N POLICY FOR R.\MS AND BO.VRS 

Requests for loans of rams under this policy continue to be received. 
However, in view of the assistance given under the Ram Premium Policy, and 
in the organization of ram clubs, loans have been restricted to associations formed 
in newly settled districts, and in districts where returned soldiers have settled. 
In 1922 there were 118 rams on loan imder this policy. These have been reduced 
during the year to 96. The reduction in the number of rams loaned has made it 
feasible to give these associations closer supervision. The operation of the 
policy has also been more definitely confined to special districts and this of itself 
has tended to reduce supervising costs as well as. intensifying the results of the 
policy where it is operated. 

Owing to the rapid expansion of the Boy's and Girls' Swine Club Policy, 
and the subsequent necessity for supplying these clubs with outstanding breeding 
sires, the demand for loans of boars to these clubs has increased during the year. 
A total of 182 boars are on loan as compared with 110 last year. 

MEETINGS AND SHORT COURSES 

Throughout the winter months an extensive programme of meetings and 
short courses was carried out. The programme of these meetings and short 
courses included the judging of hogs and sheep alive, followed by a study of the 
same animal after slaughter. It was possible by this method to give farmers a 
more definite conception as to why certain points are essential in a lamb or hog 
16— 4 J 



52 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTUBE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

from a commercial point of view. Aside from the main object of these demon- 
strations farmers are alile to gather some good pointers on home butchering. 
Sides of cured Wiltshire bacon were carried from one course to anotber for the 
purpose of illustrating the manner in which bacon is exported and the various 
grades recognized by the trade. The courses were held not only at country 
points but at a large number of the packing plants as well. It is felt that these 
meetings are largely responsible for the fact that farmers are continuing to 
demand an extension of the sale of hogs by communities on a graded basis. 

In addition to the practical features put on during the day, a special pro- 
gramme was arranged for in the evening to which men, women and children were 
invited. Educational motion pictures dealing with live stock are recognized as 
one of the most effective methods of illustrating features of live stock marketing. 
A series of films recently completed, dealing with such subjects as co-operative 
marketing of wool, swine club work, marketing and processing of hogs and the 
raising of hogs for profit, have proved of much interest and have been of great 
value in adding to the educational scope of meetings and short courses held 
during the year. During 1923 there were 182 meetings on topics related to sheep, 
263 meetings on topics related to hogs, 111 other meetings, and 152 short courses. 
At these meetings and short courses there was a total attendance of 54,092 
throughout the Dominion. 

DKMONSTR.\TIONS 

Demonstration work constitutes one of the main features of the Sheep and 
Swine Division activities. All the policies pertaining to sheep contain, as one 
of tlie qualifying regulations, the stipulation that all lambs must be docked and 
all male progeny, except pure-breds, must be castrated. Tlie effect of this 
stipulation has been widespread and when coupled with the Sheep Fairs Policy 
has enabled farmers to capitalize the practice in actual monetary returns. The 
correctness of the policy of encouraging docking and castrating has been further 
substantiated by the market cuts which went into effect on some of the stock 
yards last fall. 

Dipping demonstrations have had a definite influence in eradicating ticks. 
Interest in the dipping of sheep has been developed in many new districts 
through the demonstrations given by field men with the galvanized tanks used 
for this purpose. In order to encourage the permanent dipping of sheep in 
communities, permanent concrete tanks were built in fifty-one districts last 
year. Tlie demand for permanent tanks has been greatest in Ontario but there 
has also been some demand in the Maritime Provinces, Quebec and Manitoba. 
The low cost of construction and their adaptability for community use has made 
these tanks very popular. 

In the province of Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, and Prince 
Edward Island, a considerable number of demonstrations were given at which 
farmers were shown the proper method of removing the fleece from a sheep 
and the manner in whicli it siiould be prepared for market. There were 339 
demonstrations of this kind given and graders, who graded the wool when it 
was marketed co-operatively, state that there was a marked improvement in the 
condition of the wool as compared with former years. 

Under this heading we may also include a large number of demonstrations 
given at shipping points where hogs were graded in accordance with tlie oSicial 
grades. As a result of the inception of hog grading a year ago, there has been 
a keen demand, more particularly in Ontario, for demonstrations of this nature 
especially on hog shipping days. At such demonstrations an official grader is 
present to grade the hogs and "to explain matters pertaining to hog grading. In 
the province of Ontario alone 145 of these demonstrations were given during 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 53 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

the year. These demonstrations are particularly valuable as a means of point- 
ing out to farmers the market defects of their hogs and have been a very 
effective means of establishing the buying of hogs on grade at country points 
and on this account the demand for these demonstrations is steadily increasing. 

Associated with hog grading demonstrations there has been a demand for 
information on the grading of bacon and it has been found necessary to demon- 
strate with Wiltshire sides the actual requirements of the British market. 
Following the instructions received at hog grading and Wiltshire demonstrations 
farmers have asked for special advice in the selecting of breeding gilts. A very 
considerable number of brood sows have been selected at the hog grading demon- 
strations. In other cases farmers have requested the demonstrator to visit their 
farms in order that advice may be secured on the type of sows being kept 
for breeding purposes. These demonstrations have resulted in a demand by a 
number of districts in the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta 
for the shipment of specially selected bacon type sows from the stockyards 
for general distribution. The application of the Free Freight Policy has made 
it possible to meet these requests by selecting bacon type sows and shipping 
them out to country points in lots of twenty-five or more. By this method 
farmers have been supplied with specially selected sows at actual market values. 

A new phase of the work undertaken this year was the use of mobile 
exhibit trucks which were operated in the provinces of Alberta and Ontario. In 
Alberta the truck was instrumental in bringing to many farmers the correct 
idea of the select bacon hog and, as a result of demonstrations held, several 
hundred bacon type sows were sold in the districts visited and an average of 
one bacon type boar was sold at each demonstration given. In Ontario the 
truck was used largely in connection with sheep demonstration work including 
the dipping of sheep and exchanging and distributing of pure-bred rams. The 
truck proved to be of extreme value on Manitoulin Island where through its 
use farmers received first hand information on shearing, wool grading, sheep 
dipping, and the value of using a pure-bred ram. Both trucks proved to be a 
very economical method of reaching the farmers in districts where they do not 
readily come in contact with marketing problems. 

WOOL GRADING 

The policy of grading wool offered for co-operative sale was continued in 
1923. In some sections this year a considerable increase in the amount of 
wool sold co-operatively was noted. However, in the total amount graded 
there was some reduction as compared with former years. This reduction in 
actual amount was partly due to a smaller number of large shipments from the 
western ranches, and also because of a decrease in the size of the average farm 
flock. There were more shippers in 1923 than in some other years when more 
wool was handled. 

The prices for wool were very good in the earlier part of the season and 
wool sold previous to the end of July, particularly the Ontario, Quebec, and 
Maritime Province clips, realized very good prices. The most unfortunate thing 
about the past season's co-operative sales was that western wool, quoted at 
very high figures in the early spring, because of the time taken in collecting 
and grading, reached the market at a time when wool values were much reduced. 
During the months of October and November the market recovered consider- 
ably and the balance of the wools on hand were cleared at prices in advance 
of those prevailing during the summer months. It is gratifying to note that, 
for the first time, a considerable quantity of Canadian wool was successfully 
sold on the British markets. Over 500,000 pounds were sold to Bradford and 
London firms. 



54 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 192B 
SHEEP AND SWINE EXHIBITS 

At all the larger provincial fairs in the Dominion, at the winter fairs and 
at as many of the country fairs as was practical, sheep and swine exhibits were 
shown. 

The sheep and wool exhibits featured profits from sheep, the quality of 
Canadian wools adaptable to the manufacture of Canadian texliles, and the 
market requirements in lambs. The section devoted to featuring Canadian 
textiles made from Canadian wools attracted a great deal of interest and should 
do much to do away with the popular fallacy that one must buy imported cloth 
in order to secure wearing qualities. 

The bacon hog and its relation to Canada's swine industry was made a 
special feature of the swine exhibit section. Prolificacj' of bacon sows as a 
factor in reducing production costs, the benefits of hog grading, and the sale of 
hogs on a quality basis, were the three main ideas which were given special 
emphasis and the illustrations used in this connection did much to acquaint the 
farmer with the principles and importance of hog gradiiig in the devolpment of 
a bacon hog policy for the Dominion. 

A special exiiibit of wool and bacon was put on during the month of Februarj' 
at the T. Eaton Company, Limited store at Winnipeg. This exhibit was arranged 
in co-operation with the company as a feature of their annual attraction which 
this year included a seed grain competition. The exhibit of Canadian wools and 
textiles was quite extensive and set forth the special advantages of the wool of 
each of the four western provinces for specific purposes. The bacon hog exhibit 
by means of Wiltshire sides and carcasses from select bacon and thick smooth 
hogs cut into the various English and domestic cuts demonstrated in quite a 
convincing manner that the product of the select bacon hog is the most profit- 
able for our domestic as well as our export trade. 

CO-OPERATIVE MARKETING 

The co-eparative marketing of sheep and swine has been more or less 
centralized to sales through sheep fairs and boys' and girls' swine clubs. Through 
these mediums it is possible to assemble for sale both lambs and hogs in volume 
at local centres and to demonstrate market values by selling on a graded basis. 
In the Maritime Province the limited market for both lambs and hogs has 
necessitated the continuance of co-operative shipping and this was organized so 
as to effect local sales in sufficient volume to meet consumptive capacity and at 
a price in keeping with market values. Surplus supplies of hogs were produced 
in Prince Edward Island and assistance was given in the shipping of these to 
the Montreal market. Surplus supplies of lambs were offered for sale in such 
a manner that Boston and Montreal buyers competed and as a result very satis- 
factory prices prevailed throughout the marketing season. 

In Quebec, Ontario, and Western Canada, where pure-bred rams have been 
introduced and where special organization work had been done in connection 
with the improvement of sheep it was possible to arrange for the co-operative 
shipping of special carloads of market lambs. This was most successfully 
carried out in Cirey county, Ontario, where numbers of early lambs were marketed 
and realized the top price of 16| cents per pound. 

boys' AND girls' SWINE CLUBS 

This policy, although only adopted in 1921, has been so favourably received 
in all the provinces that, during the past year, further organization work was 
possible and during the year one hundred and fifty-eight clubs were in operation. 
As a result of the organization of this number of clubs, much new interest has 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 55 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

been created in the raising of bacon hops, large numbers of improved breeding 
stock have been introduced into club districts, members have received instruction 
on feeding and finishing methods and the foundations have been laid for improve- 
ment of the local hog marketing system. 

Quite a number of the clubs made arrangements whereby some members 
purchased specially selected breeding gilts in-the fall, these being bred to a boar 
of outstanding merit. This provided a source of supply of young pigs for the 
remaining club members in the spring. This plan of organization has the 
advantage that it ensures a supply of uniformly bred pigs of good quality. In 
other clubs, orders were given by the various members and pigs of suitable merit 
were selected to meet the requirements of club members. In some cases a supply 
could be obtained locally, while in other cases, the supply had to be shipped 
in from outside districts. 

Complete arrangements for the supply of pigs were made early in June, 
after which the pigs were tagged and members assumed responsibility for 
feeding. Several circular letters dealing with feeding and management problems 
were issued during the summer. In addition, by personal contact work, the 
members were advised as to the progress they were making, consulted about the 
feeds used and the balancing of rations for the pigs at different ages. Matters 
such as housing accommodation, exercise, and use of green feeds were also 
dealt with. In addition, club members were given instruction in the judging 
of bacon hogs. 

The local exhibits of club hogs proved to be a valuable educational feature 
of the whole policy, particularly where fifteen to twenty or more pairs of bacon 
hogs were exhibited. The local swine club fair provided an opportunity for 
the club members to study the quality of their exhibits in comparison with 
their competitors. The pigs shown at these fairs were generally of such high 
quality that parents and neighbours were definitely influenced in favour of the 
bacon hog and, as a result, members, who had the outstanding exhibits, found 
no difficulty in booking orders for pigs to be farrowed the following spring. 
The Federal Department of Agriculture pays one-third of the local prize money 
and the other two-thirds are paid by the Provincial Department and by the 
community. 

The carlot entries in the carlot Competitions were much improved over those 
of a year ago, in fact, during the fall montlis, the hog grading records show tliat 
there was a decided increase in the percentage of select bacon hogs during the 
period when swine club hogs were going to market. The breeding, type and 
finish of the carlot entries reflected the value of care in selecting breeding stock 
and in paying close attention to all the details of feeding practice. Information 
gathered from some of the districts in which the best carlots were finished 
indicate that these members made the greatest use possible of skim milk and 
green feeds. On this account their production costs were particularly low, thus 
leaving them a good margin of profit over cost of production. 

Teams of two boys from each club competed at the central marketing 
points in a bacon hog judging competition. Over four hundred club members 
visited their respective marketing centres where they saw the carlots entered 
in the carlot competitions, participated in the judging competitions, observed 
the methods of buying and selling practiced at the stockyards, visited packing 
plants, and, in a general way, became acquainted with the procedure common 
to the marketing of livestock. The knowledge thus gained will enable them 
to develop breed improvement policies with a clearer understanding of market 
requirements. 

The Federal Department of Agriculture pays all the prize money for the 
Carlot Competitions and for the Interclub Judging Competitions. The agri- 
cultural field men of the various provinces undertake the responsibility of 



56 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

orfianizing the swine clubs under this policy and a great deal of the success 
attiiined is due to the splendid efforts of these field men. The sheep and swine 
promoters have co-operated with the provincial men in organization work, in 
securing a s:i;r. ble supply of pigs and have participated in the contact work 
with the club i^ombers in association with the provincial field men. Similarly 
federal promoters have had the assistance and co-operation of the provincial 
officers in making arrangements for the judging competitions and the marketing 
of the carlots entered in the carlot competitions. 

HOG GRADING 

Hog grading has now been in effect for sixteen months and, while there 
is practically nothing by way of precedent and no statistics to refer to, yet 
there is evidence in plenty to indicate that hog grading has done more than 
any other policy towards improving tlie quality of Canadian liogs. 

During the year, as a result of the hog grading regulations, packers' buyers 
and live stock commission men at the various stock yards have become definitely 
acquainted with the official hog grades. The continued grading of hogs at all 
marketing centres has also acquainted shipping agents and drovers with the 
weights and types of hogs designated to the various grades. Farmers also, 
through contact with buyer or shippers and through the medium of meetings 
and demonstrations have come to realize more and more what is required in a 
select bacon hog both from the standpoint of type and finish. This knowledge, 
on the part of the trade, has permitted of steps being taken to simplify the 
grading methods at stockyards and packing plants. Similarly the fact that 
drovers and farmers are now acquainted with the grades of hogs has permitted 
of the buying and selling of hogs at many country points on a graded basis with 
general satisfaction to both producer and buyer. 

The whole policy of hog grading is therefore steadily gaining in popularity 
largely because, firstly: it has been found to be a practical method of trading 
in hogs; secondly, it has greatly improved the quality of hogs in the Dominion, 
and thirdly, has provided a basis of scale which recognizes quality in product. 
Hog grading statistics show the percentage of select bacon hogs to be 14-97 
per cent in 1923, but these statistics do not tell the whole story in so far as 
analyzing the figures pertaining to the marketing of commercial hogs. The 
infusion of bacon blood has modified the type of the thick smooth hogs to a 
very marked degree. Quite a percentage of these hogs are now approaching the 
select bacon standard and, in consequence thereof, produce a muc'j better 
carcass. The average finished weight of both the select bacon and thick smooth 
hogs indicates that farmers are paying close attention to the correct market 
weights. 

One of the main difliiculties under which the grading system has laboured 
has been to find a solution for the problem of getting the premium back to the 
producer of the select bacon hogs. From the outset, the majority of shipping 
associations and a percentage of drovers have made returns to farmers on a 
graded basis. The percentage of drovers who buy on grade is steadily increasing* 
but there is still a big percentage of hog? bought on a flat basis at country 
points. In many districts, where hogs are sold flat, th.c percentage of select 
bacon hogs is so very small that no great loss is sustained . On the other 
hand, there are many good districts where the quality of the hogs is good 
and where Uie drover buys flat and verj' often sells at tlic market pomt on a 
graded basis. In Kuch districts it is felt that the farmers sliould take action 
tc protect themselves and organize so as to secure the advantage of selling 
their hogs on grade. An effort is being made to bring to the attention of farmers 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 67 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

in tlic poorer hop; raising sections the value of the bacon hog type in the produc- 
tion of commercial hogs, and steady progress is being made with these com- 
munities, although it will take time to cover all the ground needing attention. 

At the Ia,<t meeting of the Joint Swine Committee recommendations were 
made to the Minister of Agriculture to have certain cliangcs made in the weight 
limits of the official grades and, as the recommendations were approved by 
the minister, they were made effective by Order in Council No. 352. Under 
this Order in Council a difference of ten pounds is made between hogs weighed 
off cars and those that are fed and watered. This brings hogs, handled under 
the two methods of sale, to a common level of relative values. 

The following extract from Order in Council No. P.C. 352 includes the 
amendments respecting the grading of hogs: — 

3. Hogs inleaded for slaughter in Canada and when sold or accepted for purchase 
according to grade shall be graded as follows; — 

Grade 1. — Select Bacon: Hogs weighing 170 to 220 pounds W.O.C. at stockyards and 
abattoirs, or hogs weighing ISO to 230 pounds fed and watered at stockyards or at local 
shipping (points and at such other points as naay be designated from time to time; of a 
type and finish indicating suitability for the production of choice bacon. Jowl and shoulder 
light and smooth; b^ick from neck to tail evenly fleshed; side long, medium depth, dropping 
reasonably straight from back; ham full, good general finish; no e.xcess fat. 

Grade 2. — Thick Smooth; Hogs w^eighing 100 to 210 pounds W.O.C. at stockyards and 
abattoirs or hogs weighing 170 to 220 pounds fed and watered at stockyards or at local 
shipping points and at such other points as may be designated from time to time not 
conforming to Select Bacon standard but of smooth conformation and finish. 

Grade 3. — Shop Hogs: Hogs weighing 120 to 160 pounds W.O.C. at stockyards and 
abattoirs or hogs weighing 130 to 170 pounds fed and watered at stockyards or at local 
shipping points and at such other points as may be designated from time to time, of 
smooth conformation and finish. 

Grade 4. — Heavies: Hogs weighing over the maximum weights for selects and thick 
smooths and up to 260 pounds W.O.C. at stockyards and abattoirs or hogs weighing up to 
270 pounds fed and watered at stockyards or at local shipping points and at such other 
points as may be designated from time to time. Hogs of Select Bacon or Thick Smooth 
conformation and finish. 

Grade 5. — Extra Heavies: Hogs weighing over 260 pounds WXD.C. at stockyards and 
abattoirs or hogs weighing over 270 pounds fed and watered at stockyards or at local 
shipping points and at such other points as may be designated from time to time. Of 
Smooth conformation and finish. 

Grade 6. — Feeders: All imfinished hogs of any weight. Any type of smooth con- 
formation but unfinished. 

Grade 7. — Roughs: Hog.s of rough conform.ation. Any weight. 

Grade 8. — Sows: All females that have raised one or more litters. 

Sub-Grade (a). — ^Those of smooth finish and trim underline weighing up to 350 pounds 
at stockyards and abattoirs or sows weighing up to 360 pounds at local shipping points 
and at such other points as may be designated from time to time. 

Sub-Grade (b). — All other sows. 

Grade 9. — Stags: Boars which have been castrated and are well healed. 

It will be noted that the new Order in Council provides for a weight range 
on select bacon hogs at country points of 180 to 230 pounds. This weight 
range, allowing for the usual shrinkage in transit to market or for fed and 
watered hogs when shrunk for slaughter, produces a range of carcasses suitable 
for making Wiltshires of the most desirable weights for the British market. 
This increase in weights for select bacon hogs gives the producer of this grade 
an added advantage in marketing because he can now keep his hogs longer 
during a period when gains are rapid and most economical. 

No change has been made in the weights for thick smooth hogs except 
that, as in all other grades, a difference of ten pounds is allowed between off 
car hogs and fed and watered hogs. It was not considered wise to raise the 



58 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

weights of thick smooth hogs because, by so doing, it would be necessarj' to 
include heavier and fatter hogs which would deteriorate the quality of the 
class and lower their commercial value. 

It is expected that the new Order in Council will give added stimulus to 
the production of bacqn hogs in the Dominion. 

The following table gives a brief summary of the hog grading statistics 
for the year 1923: 



SUMM.\RY OF 


OFFICIAL HOG GRADING BY 


PROVINCE 


S, YEAR 


923 


Grading 


•Mberta 


Saskatchewan 


Manitoba 


Stock 
yards 


Packing 
plants 


Stock 
yards 


Packing 
plants 


Stock 
yards 


Parking 
plants 




5,007 

116,730 

5,238 

787 

13,905 

14.106 

485 

3.783 

1,831 

287 


4,541 

183,408 

5,999 

530 
40,447 
3,4.32 

738 
5,365 
2,440 

230 


2,307 

31.278 

3,969 

1,209 

3,603 

1,460 

180 

1,608 

750 

147 


688 

19,480 

1.353 

346 

2,309 

732 

79 

1,072 

436 

76 


15.095 

149.307 

18.911 

5.297 

15,631 

25.479 

702 

8.695 

4,042 

633 


4.245 


Thick smooth 


30.763 




1,632 




412 




4,870 




1,219 




69 


Sows No. 1 


1,334 


Sows No. 2 


574 


Stags 


93 






Total 


162,159 


247,130 


46,511 


26,571 


243,792 


45.211 









Ontario 


Quebec 


Total 




100,228 

185,559 

28,956 

1,718 

39.348 

8.548 

103 

1.494 

5,674 

449 


178,902 

589,967 

54,427 

5,072 

96,632 

28,042 

744 

3,777 

12,260 

1,040 


30,219 

82,393 

9,169 

799 

65,565 

6,609 

695 

775 

5,658 

269 


29,510 
75,404 
5,443 
1,055 
41 , 759 
1,358 

lis 

1,193 

3,941 

281 


152.856 
565,267 
66.243 
9,810 
138,052 
56.202 
2,165 
16,3.55 
17,955 
1,785 


217,886 




899,022 




68,854 




7,415 




186,017 




34,783 




1,748 


Sows No. 1 


12.741 




19.651 


Stags 


1,720 






Total 


372,077 


970,863 


202.151 


160.062 


1.026.690 


1.449.837 







HOG GRADING AS SHOWN BY PERCENTAGES 
(Stock Yards and Packing Plants Combined) 



Grading 


Alberta 

Per cent of 
total 


Saskat- 
chewan 

Per cent of 
total 


Manitoba 

Per cent of 
total 


Ontario 

Per cent of 
total 


Quebec 

Per cent of 
total 


All 
Provinces 

Per cent of 
total 




2-33 
73-33 
2-75 
0-33 
13-28 
4-28 
0-30 
2-24 
1-04 
0-12 


410 
69-45 
7-28 
2-13 
8 09 
30 
0-35 
3-67 
1-62 
0-31 


6-69 
62-31 
711 
1-98 
7-09 
9-24 
0-27 
3-46 
1-60 
0-25 


20-78 
57-75 
6-20 
0-51 
1013 
2-72 
0-06 
39 

012 


16-49 
43-56 
4-03 
0-52 
29-63 
2-20 
0-22 
0-55 
2-65 
0-15 


14-97 


Thick smooth 


59-13 




5 45 




70 




13 03 




3-67 




0-16 




1-17 


Sows No. 2 


1-52 


Stags 


14 






Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 







Note. — The above tables show the grading of hogs market<xl in the various provinces, regardless of 
the province of origin. For example, marketings in Quebec include a large percentage of Ontario hogs. 
Figures showing marketings by province and county of origin will be published in report No. 4 "Origin 
and Quality of Live Stock Marketed in Canada" at a later date. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 69 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

BACON GRADING INVESTIGATIONAL WORK 

During the past year an officer of the branch has devoted practically his 
entire time to familiarizing himself with methods and practices in the various 
packing plants tiiroughout the Dominion, and in addition to this, ten weeks 
of his time was spent in England studying the requirements of the bacon 
market there and the relationship of our product to these requirements. A 
complete report with recommendations covering this work has been submitted 
to the minister. 

A brief of this report was submitted to the Joint Swine Committee for 
their consideration and, after due consideration, they passed a resolution recom- 
mending that it was not considered feasible at the present time to grade Cana- 
dian bacon officially, but were of opinion that further work should be carried 
on by the Department in co-operation with the packers with a view to securing 
continued improvement in the development of existing grade standards. The 
Committee were further of opinion that the unification and improvement of 
bacon standards will depend largely on the improvement in the quality of 
Canadian hogs. 

Acting in accordance with the recommendations made by the Joint Swine 
Committee, further investigational work will be carried on. In order to expedite 
this work and to centralize discussion and thought on a definite objective, each 
exporting packer has received a copy of the report as presented to the Joint 
Swine Committee. After this has received their consideration, it is the inten- 
tion to have a representative of this Branch meet the packers as a body and 
to discuss the objective of securing official recognition for grades of Canadian 
bacon. 

Further work has already been instituted to analyze the degree of uniform- 
ity in our export of \Viltshires, but as yet there is nothing to report. 

BACON PRODUCTION TEST WORK 

Two years ago an effort was made to secure information which would 
make it possible to grant recognition to breeding stock that has proved their 
ability in the production of bacon hogs. Last year further information was 
obtained by scoring the carcasses of a number of experimental hogs. The diffi- 
culties attached to securing central feeding stations and also a proper means of 
correlating the carcass scores with other information pertaining to feeding and 
management has made it impossible to announce a programme in this work 
which would be satisfactory to conditions in all parts of the Dominion. 

At the present time valuable information is being secured on the relative 
merits of breeding stock by analysis of hog grading and what it siiows concern- 
ing the hogs from a given district. This is being further developed with a view 
to showing the percentage of selects from the various boars in the district. This 
work shows promise and it is hoped that, during the coming year, various 
provincial organizations may be induced to co-operate in securing this informa- 
tion. 

Further to encourage and direct the efforts of pure-bred swine breeders in 
order to ensure the distribution of the proper type of bacon breeding boars and 
sows, it is proposed this year to encourage pure-bred breeders to enter two hogs 
from a litter in a carcass competition. These will be held at five centres in 
Canada and, coincident with this competition, a short course will be held. At 
these courses the results of cutting demonstrations and of experimental feed- 
ing trials will be placed before the breeders in such a way as to emphasize the 
proper course for their activities as breeders. 



60 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
Lm; STOCK PUHCHASED 

The organization work connected with the Sheep Fairs and Boys' and Girls' 
Swine Club policies has created a demand for the participation of our field men 
in the selection of stock of tlie desired type. Districts have been encouraged to 
appoint purchasing agents who have been advised and aided when making 
selections. The knowledge which our field men have of pure-bred stock available 
for sale has enabled them to bring many individual buyers and sellers together 
in effecting purchases and sales. 

Owing to the restrictions placed on the importation of pure-bred stock from 
Great Britain as a result of foot and mouth disease, our breeders of pure-bred 
sheep and swine had reached the point where they felt that their flocks and herds 
were decidedly in need of new blood. It was realized that individual breeders 
would be decidedly handicapped in securing suitable individuals, and, further- 
more, the purchasing and transportation costs would be prohibitive. The 
breeders requested assistance from the Federal and Provincial Departments of 
Agriculture in order that importations of both sheep and swine might be made in 
sufficient numbers to meet the breeders' requirements. A plan of assistance was 
authorized which provided for the defraying of all purchasing and transportation 
costs, provided one-half of these costs were met by the various Provincial 
Departments in the provinces where the breeders participated. 

The regulations provided for the appointment of one purchasing delegate 
from each province or a group of provinces where thirty or more head of stock 
was ordered. The provinces of Ontario, Quebec. Saskatchewan, New Brunswick, 
Nova Scotia and British Columbia co-operated in giving assistance to their 
breeders, and Purchasing Delegates were appointed for Ontario, Quebec and 
Saskatchwan. Orders from the other provinces were taken care of by the 
Dominion representative who was also responsible for details of finance, regis- 
tration, certificates, insurance, transportation and shipping arrangements. 

Each breeder in placing an order for an imported animal, in addition to 
making the initial deposit, specified the breed, age. price and other particulars 
regarding the type of animal required. The purchasing delegates endeavoured 
to buy animals of the specified qualities mentioned in the order and within the 
price range limit. Considerable difficulty was experienced in securing animals of 
the desired quality and at prices stipulated by Canadian breeders. However. 
the orders were eventually all filled and, upon delivery, apparently gave general 
satisfaction to the breeders who placed orders. 

GOAT EXTENSION WORK 

The interest which was evidenced in the goat demonstrations held in 1922 
seemed to warrant their continuance this year and accordingly the work was 
carried out in the vicinity of Oakville, Humber Bay, Long Branch, Weston, 
Westmount, Mount Denis, Fairbank and Mimico. In these districts truck 
farming is being carried on and, as the farms are small and intensively farmed, 
it is not considered economical to keep a cow although there is ample roughage 
suitable for a goat. These sections have difficulty in getting a suitable milk 
supply consequently their needs can be most easily met by keeping a family 
goat. 

As a result of contact work brought about tiirough the demonstrations 
already held, numerous sales have been effected. However, the demand is away 
beyond the available supply provided by Ontario goat breeders, and the Ontario 
Milk Goat Breeders' Association is contemplating the importation of a carload 
or more of milking does from the province of British Columbia. If these does 
arc available it will warrant the department in carrying on further goat demon- 
stration work in 1924. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 61 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

Markets Intelligence and Stockyards Service Division 

The Markets Intelligence and Stockyards Service has been in operation 
since 1916. 

Tlie policies effective through this division promote the development of live 
stock marketing in the Dominion along lines designed to stimulate efficiency 
in actual purchase and sale. 

Under provisions of the Live Stock and Live Stock Products Act, consolidated 
and revised in 1923, this Division tlirouph the Live Stock Commissioner, enforced 
regulations governing the construction, maintenance and operation of public 
stockyards in Canada, and the mctliods employed in public purchase and sale 
of publicly marketed commercial live stock. The Division also procured and 
distributed detailed information on supply and demand, maintained a bureau 
on general live stock and meat trade information, issued up to date, daily, 
weekly, monthly and annual market reviews. It supplemented the above pub- 
licity with statistical information concerning the origin, quality and outlet of 
ever>' meat animal publicly marketed. Also, associated with the service on 
the domestic industry and trade, was one on foreign live stock and trade con- 
ditions. 

The stockyards activities are undertaken by especially qualified officers of 
the branch, stationed at each of the terminal stockyards. These yards are eight 
in number, and are located at the following places: Calgary, Alta.; Edmonton, 
Alta.; Prince Albert, Sask.; Moose Jaw, Sask.; Winnipeg, Man.; Toronto, Ont. ; 
East End, Montreal, Que., and West End, Montreal, Que. The Markets Intelli- 
gence Service is provided through tiie co-operation of the stockyards agents and 
their assist-\nts with the Markets Intelligence editorial and statistical staff at 
headquarters in Ottawa. 

Some idea of the extent of supervision and general activity necessary to 
deal with this commercial phase of the livestock industry of the five provinces, 
may be obtained from the following figures: During the past year, over 1,000.000 
cattle, 260,000 calves, 1,000,000 hogs and 500,000 sheep and Iambs were handled 
through public stockyards operated under the Act. The value of that amount 
at public sale was approximately $40,000,000 for cattle, $2,350,000 for calves, 
S18.500,000 for hogs and $3,500,000 for sheep and lambs, a total value of 
§63,850.000. The equipment and service necessary to the handling and sale of 
approximately that total volume and value of business is under the constant 
supervision of the Stockyard agents. In addition a detailed record of every 
sale was made, recorded and despatched to headquarters for statistical purposes, 
and used both for the Stockyards office and tlie Ottawa office as a basis for 
market letters, market reports, and market wires. 

OUTLINE OF WORK 

1. The enforcement of regulations made under the Live Stock Products 
Act, consolidated and revised in 1923, has resulted in the bonding of commission 
men, operating on public stockyards, efficient and standardized operation of 
live stock exchanges, the elimination of undesirable traders and practices on 
the yards, the regulation of charges made on tlie yards by the stockyards com- 
pany and by commission men for services, improvement in accommodation for 
live stock, and the regulating of the quality and cliarges on feed supplied by 
the stockyards companies. 

2. Officers of the branch, located at the Central Stockyards at Montreal, 
Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgan.-, Edmonton and Prince Albert, classified and graded, 
for purposes of information, all live stock offered for sale, obtained details as 
to tlie selling price, origin and disposition of the stock and on tiie general con- 
dition of supply and demand. 



62 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

3. The stockyards oflBces supplied the press with daily market news letters 
and representative live stock sales. The need for absolute accuracy in com- 
mercial reports is recognized, and a superior quality of material is the object; 
these together with the extended weekly, monthly and annual analysis of supply 
and demand, have practically supplemented other sources of markets informa- 
tion. The effect has been the standardization of market reports throughout the 
Dominion, guaranteed accuracy and quick service, where heretofore many con- 
tradictorj' ambiguous, or unreliable statements of market conditions were in 
circulation. 

4. The Inter-Stockyards Telegraph Service inaugurated during 1919, con- 
sisted of an exchange of market wires between stockyards offices, for a public 
posting, so that a knowledge of trade conditions on one market may be avail- 
able on all otlier markets as soon as the day's trading is established. These tele- 
grams are prepared by tiie stockyards agents after a careful analysis of the 
condition of trading and wired each day as soon as the market is established to 
the other stockyards in Canada. Previously, only firms which could afford to 
have a private telegraph service were able to benefit by immediate knowledge 
of the day's trading conditions at other than their own market. As the trend 
of busines.s on one yard may greatly affect that on other yards, this service is of 
tremendous value to the trade, and verj' effective in bringing about a clearance 
of stock. 

5. The Daily Markets Telegraph Service inaugurated in 1919 was con- 
tinued. This consisted of analysis of the condition of supply and demand, 
telegraphed over the wires of the Canadian Press, Limited, for publication in 
the daily press of Canada. These wires are prepared by the officers at each 
of the yards, at 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily, and appear the same evening and the 
following morning in practically ever>' evening and morning paper in Canada. 
These have a reputation as being absolutely reliable. 

6. A Weekly Markets News Service is prepared and mailed to the agri- 
cultural press of Canada, to district representatives of Agriculture, to a selected 
producers' mailing list, and to the various Provincial Departments of Agri- 
culture. This service consists of an analysis of the week's supply and demand 
for live stock; comments on prospects for future markets, statistical tables 
showing comparatively, the grading, numbers, average price, price range for 
bulk of sales, and top price of all live stock offered for sale, the disposition and 
comparative receipts of the same, the gradings of hogs under official grades, 
and the exports of live stock. 

7. In oi'dcr that the weekly agricultural newspapers and financial trade 
journals might have the most up to date markets information obtainable, a 
special market report was prepared on the opening market of each week, by 
the stockyards representatives and sent to the farm press in time for publica- 
tion in the current issue. 

8. Each month, publicity was given to the live stock industry by the dis- 
tribution of interesting information on crops, weather condition, live stock and 
allied industries, as regards both domestic and foreign fields. Tiiis information 
is distributed through the regular mailing list. 

9. Memoranda on production, distribution and consumption of live stock 
and live stock products, both domestic and foreign were prepared for the 
information of officers of the department. 

10. Numerous articles and press notices touching on the live stock industry 
prepared, either voluntarily or by request, for publication in the press. 

11. The division continued the building up of an information service with 
reference to statistical condition of local production and distribution of live 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 63 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

stock, general condition under which live stock production was undertaken, the 
foreign live stock situation; world's animal foodstuffs situation; the condition 
of the import and export trade in live stock and live stock products, and 
financial conditions influencing the industry. 

12. The Division undertook the recording of the point of origin, class, 
grade and sex of all stock offered for sale at stockyards. It is estimated that 
the total marketings including direct shipments for the year exceeded three 
million five hundred head. Our records cover the sales trade during the past 
four years and arc compiled in such a way as to be of immediate value in 
estimating the condition and extension of the marketable surplus, either locally, 
provincially, or for the Dominion. Policy to bring about improved conditions 
as regards production for markets and marketing is receiving definite direction 
through the medium of these records. 

13. The service obtains from the various packing plants throughout the 
Dominion, weekly statements as to shipping station of private or country 
purchases. As from 40 to 70 per cent of the annual slaughterings by inspected 
establishments do not appear on the public market, the aptness of the informa- 
tion obtained can be appreciated. 

14. Through arrangement between the Departments of Agriculture and 
Customs, the branch is now recording and issuing information covering the 
origin and destination of all classes of live stock exported from the Dominion. 
This information completes the scheme for a full record of the total movement 
of Canadian live stock during the period of the year, and allows for the work- 
ing out of formula on which to estimate probable proceeds and distribution. 

15. A connection has been made with British firms interested in the Cana- 
dian trade in store cattle, with importers and distributors of Canadian fresh- 
killed beef and with distributors of Canadian bacon, and has established a 
clearer understanding of the problems involved in the export trade in relation 
to the British market. 

16. A Weekly Cable Service on the British Market for Canadian cattle 
and bacon is telegraphed by the division, to the Canadian newspapers. The 
information is being supplied by the most reliable operators on the markets at 
Glasgow, Liverpool and London. These cables arc elaborated in the branch and 
given the widest publicity possible through the medium of the Associated 
Press of Canada and other mediums of publicity. 

17. A daily wire service is operative between the stockyards officers and 
the United States markets, with a view to obtaining exact and immediate 
knowledge of the prospects for export. Considerable financial benefit to the 
live stock industry is resulting from this service, shippers having been better 
able to estimate tlie margin between domestic and foreign market prices, before 
making shipment. 

18. Reports consisting of the classification and grading of all classes of 
meat animals shipped by drovers, packers, buyers and farmers organizations, 
from all shipping points in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and 
Alberta is being supplied to producers and the trade. 

19. Purchasers of live stock under the Car Lot and Free Freight Policies 
of the branch were again given assistance by the stockyards agents. The activi- 
ties of the agents greatly facilitates the movement back to country points, 
and as well materially encourages the conser%'ation of desirable stock. 

20. The Fifth Annual Review of the Live Stock Meat Trade Situation 
was published and distributed. 

21. The Third Annual Report of the Origin and Grades of Commercial Live 
Stock was published and distributed. 



64 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

22. The administration of the policy whereby immature calves offered for 
sale on public stockyards are subject to condemnation, is administered through 
the Live Stock Commissioner by the stockyards representatives. Suitable 
calves are allowed to be shipped for store purposes. This policy has been 
effective for a number of years, and has resulted in marked improvement of the 
quality of veal. 

WORK RECENTLY UNDERT.^KZN 

The Markets staff in the branch is taking care of the compilation of grad- 
ing and prices paid on the new ba-is of sale under the Hog Grading Policy. The 
trend of production and marketing is being interpreted from the records sub- 
mitted by the official graders and statements on which to base practical and 
close-up publicity work are being prepared, as also a statistical report on the first 
year of grading. 

The stockyards agents are assisting the graders in every way possible, co- 
operating in promoting satisfactory- development of the work. 

The brancli, through this division, has developed a form of Trust Account 
for the live stock commission houses at stockyards, with the primary object 
of protecting the industry against financial losses, so as to promote the com- 
mission business to a higher plane than formerly. 

The stockyards agents have extended their activities toward promoting 
familiarity with required market types of live stock. On request, the agents 
,address meetings, pay visits to farms for the purpose of grading the stock into 
the various classes and commenting on the commercial value of each, and as 
well encourage the clearance of unsuitable feeding stock and the purchase of 
that of good feeding type and quality. 

All activities in the division are designed to develop the commercial end 
of the live stock industry, and a steady improvement is perceptible in many 
phases of marketing operations. 

During 1924-25, this division will confine its efforts to perfecting and enlarg- 
ing the projects already in operation. 



THE SEED BRANCH 

The Seed Branch maintains laboratories or analytical services for the 
testing of seeds, feeding stuffs and fertilizers; encourages the production of 
superior seeds for domestic requirements and export; develops the marketing of 
seeds, feeding stuffs and fertilizers; and provides an inspection service for the 
enforcement of the Acts which control the sale of these products. 

Seed Testing .\nd Feed Analysis 

During the year April 1, 1923, to March 31, 1924, 41.291 samples of seed 
and feed were received and analyzed, the former for purity or germination, in 
most cases for both, the latter for the determination of ingredients. The follow- 
ing table gives an analysis of the number of samples received in each of the 
five laboratories, and their sources: — 






Quebec 


Ottawa 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 


Calgary 


Trade 


970 
976 
43 


9,98.5 
1,046 
1.139 
90 
2,632 


,5,108 

2,376 

401 


3,659 

2.850 

98 

187 

171 


4,410 




1,821 


Official 


140 




40 




875 


946 


1,328 






Totals 


2,864 


14,892 


8,831 


6,965 


7.739 







REPORT OF THE MINISTER 65 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

The Quebec laboratory was opened officially on January 1, 1924, and the 
number of samples given for Quebec in the above table wa? received during the 
three months. 

Trade refers to samples of seed sent in by merchants, farmers and institu- 
tions. 

Customs refers to samples of seed taken from imported shipments by the 
customs oflBcials. 

Official includes both seed and feed samples taken by inspectors from lota 
which are sold or offered for sale and suspected of violating the Seeds Act or 
the Feeding Stuffs Act. Prosecutions are based on the results of analyses of 
.such official samples. 

Feeding stuffs includes all feeds, and in addition condiments and tonics 
sent in by farmers, merchants and others who desire to know the approximate 
composition and value. 

Investigation comprises all work of an experimental nature. 

SEED IN\'ES'nGATION 

During the past year the methods of testing seeds, especially with regard 
to germination tests, have been somewhat modified. All chan"ges are ba.sed on 
a considerable amount of investigational work. Some special work commenced 
in former years has been carried further and new problems have been investi- 
gated between trade seasons, as follows: — 

1. Standard samples supplied by the Association of Official Seed Analysts 
of North America, and another series supplied by a European station, have been 
tested with a view to standardizing, in so far as practicable, laboratory methods 
of seed testing. 

2. Longevity tests of field root and garden seeds have been continued. 

3. A series of tests on a broad basis has been commenced with a view to 
ascertaining the influence of storage conditions on the vitality of different kinds 
of seeds. 

4. The studies on the characteristics of Canadian grown red clover seed 
have been continued. This work was undertaken in collaboration with Euro- 
pean and American workers. 

5. Investigations on the bulking and sampling of seeds, in connection with 
establishing a tolerance formula applicable to variations between two testa 
on samples taken from the same lot. 

6. Investigation of different methods of germinating certain kinds of seeds, 
especially those brought under grade by the Seeds Act, 1923. 

7. Study of new methods for determining the percentage of other cultivated 
seeds occurring in clover and alfalfa seed. 

8. The influence of diluted solutions on the germination of certain seeds. 

SEED COLLECTION 

The collection of economic and weed seeds has been revised in accordance 
with the new Seeds Act. It contains 100 samples in glass vials which are 
labelled with the common names, and includes besides certain grass and clover 
seeds, the primary and secondary noxious and the common harmful or useless 
weed seeds found in Canada. They are arranged in numerical order with key 
of scientific names, and are retained by steel clips in a hea\-y cloth-pasteboard 
box. The price of the collection is five dollars prepaid in Canada. 
1&— 5 



66 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
MICROANALYSIS OF FEEDING STUFFS 

The feeds examined in the laboratory during the j'ear may be summarized 
as follows: — 

MilHecds IBS 

Screenings 95 

Concentrates and condiraental feeds 90 

Miscellaneous 141 

Total 491 

A number of the millfeeds were sent in by individuals who had suspected 
them of being injurious to the health of animals or had found them unsatisfactory 
for feeding purposes. It is quite probable, however, that the amendment to 
the Feeding Stuffs Act, whereby wheat by-products are sold unmixed, will do 
away with further complaints. 

The elimination of screenings as an adulterant of millfeeds naturally led 
to an increased quantity of mill screenings on the market. To ascertain the 
average quality of such feeds as percentage analysis was made of 56 unground 
samples. This investigational work also provided a valuable addition to an 
already large collection of standard reference samples. 

In the summer of 1923 a general survey was made of a number of con- 
centrates and condimental feeds on the market. It was found that on the whole 
they contained the ingredients claimed by the manufacturer on registration, but 
a percentage determination of ingredients showed that this list was by no means 
an index of the quality of the feed. In some cases, indeed, where only a small 
fraction of one per cent of a cereal or condiment had been added and the feed 
was not thoroughly mixed in the process of manufacture, more than one sample 
of the feed had to be taken before even the slightest trace of said ingredients was 
detected on analysis. 

Many of the other feeds examined showed a varied use of by-products as 
ingredients. Some of these feeds were of very poor quality but the high grade 
of a few others would lead to the belief that, in judicious combinations, most 
by-products could be utilized to good advantage. 

Feed investigations were conducted as follows: — 

1. Method of determining mould content of a sample of feeding stuffs and 
the effect on this content of shipping the sample in air-tight glass containers. 

2. Comparison of a cereal by-product with the chop manufactured from a 
low-grade sample of the same cereal. 

3. Microanalytical studies in the qualitative and quantitative determination 
of ground feeding stuffs and stock tonics. 

The Seed Division 

The Chief of the Seed Division devotes attention to that part of production 
pertaining to interprovincial and interdistrict commerce in seed supplies, and to 
the international trade in seeds of- all kinds. 

Laws and regulations applying to the export and import of seeds have a 
very important bearing on Canadian seed supply. The trend of the trade in 
many kinds of seeds would seem to indicate that unless our seed control regu- 
lations are equivalent to those of other countries we are apt to have on our 
markets too much of the seed of a quality that cannot be marketed to advantage 
in those countries because of their higher standards and more efficient control. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 67 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

THE SEEDS ACT 

The Seeds Act, 1923, with the regulations made by the Minister of Agri- 
culture, came into operation November 1, 1923, and is proving a very successful 
means of preventing the marketing of inferior seeds, both home-grown and 
imported. The favourable reception accorded the Act and grade standards has 
been due in no small degree to tlic consultation with advice of the Advisory 
Board appointed under the Act, and to the thoughtful deliberations given the 
Bill by the Agricultural Committee of the House of Commons before the Act 
was finally passed and made law. 

Several pleasing comments received from Canadian and United States 
sources more than compensate for a few adverse criticisms from parties who have 
been restricted from handling their seed business in the same manner as was 
their custom in the past. 

In connection with the standards contained in the regulations it is proposed 
to make such changes from year to year as ought to be made to provide for the 
variations in each season's crop. Provision is made to have the Advisory Seed 
Board, which is composed of equal numbers of representatives of farmers and 
seed merchants, meet each fall and make recommendations in this connection. 
The Minister has power to make changes in the regulations without the necessity 
of amending the Act. 

CANADIAN SEED EXHIBIT AT BRITISH EMPIRE EXHIBITION 

A thoroughly representative Canadian seed exhibit was selected and pre- 
pared for display at the British Empire Exhibition. The aim was to secure: 

First, an educational exhibit showing the varieties of seeds originated or 
improved by plant breeders and particularly well adapted to northern climatic 
conditions; and 

Second, a commercial exhibit showing representative samples of seed 
available for commerce in car lots for both home consumption and export. 

Thirty boxes of seed, of approximately six hundred pounds each, were 
assembled in Ottawa and shipped to London in care of the Canadian Exhibition 
Commissioner. Suitable pictures to illustrate seed production and marketing, 
and sheaves of grain, grasses and clovers for decorative purposes, formed a 
part of the exhibit. This material was collected from various Dominion and 
provincial plant breeding stations, individual growers, and the wholesale seed 
trade, and included the first prize Canadian championship exhibits at the larger 
Canadian shows and at the International Hay and Grain Show, Chicago. 

INVESTIGATION 

In connection with the control of the trade in field root and garden vegetable 
seeds, samples of the different kinds and varieties distributed by wholesale 
seedsmen are taken from the retail dealers and tested at Ottawa for vitality and 
genuineness of variety. The latter is determined in field tests conducted by the 
Forage Plant and Horticultural Divisions of the Experimental Farms Branch. 

During 1923, 3,053 plots of field root and garden seeds were tested, and the 
notes taken on these tests will be used in revising standards under the regulations 
for the sale of these seeds in Canada. These plot tests, which are being carried 
on again this year with vegetable seeds only, will provide data for preparing a 
list of standard variety names and descriptions for addition as an appendix to 
the regulations under the Seeds Act. Members of the wholesale seed trade 
with whom this matter has been discussed approve the establishing of such a 
list, which will scr^-e to simplify the advertising in seed catalogues principally 
through the elimination of the many synonymous variety names that are now 
carried by the Canadian trade. 

16— 5J 



68 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
CO-OPERATIOX WITH THE PROVINCES 

With a view to encouraging the production of high grade, hardy, northern 
grown seed for commerce, subventions arc paid to Provincial Departments of 
Agriculture towards conducting seed crop competitions, combined seed crop and 
cleaned seed competitions, seed fairs, and provincial seed exhibitions. The 
ma.ximum amounts made available for each of these competitions from the Seed 
Branch appropriation are as follows: — 

Standing fipld crop competition $ .SO 00 

Combined seed crop and cleaned seed competition . . 200 00 

Local seed fair 75 00 

Provincial seed exhibition 600 00 

Any one agricultural society is eligible to conduct competitions, including 
either a field crop competition and seed fair, or a combined seed crop and cleaned 
seed competition and seed fair. The subvention grants are payable to the Provin- 
cial Departments of Agriculture on the basis of two-thirds of the premiums paid 
by the provinces in prize money, but shall not exceed the maximum amounts 
above named. The provinces pay the cost of organization and judging, so that 
the expenditures by the Provincial and Dominion Departments of Agriculture 
are about equal. 

The subventions paid by the Seed Branch on account of these competitions 
during the fiscal year ending March 31, 1924, were as follows: — 



STANDING FIELD CROP COMPETITIONS 



Prince Edward Island. 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 



Number 


Amount 


8 $ 


180 00 


26 


999 95 


120 


5,. 550 00 


248 


9.135 93 


36 


1,222 79 


167 


5,634 65 



605 $ 22,723 32 



COMBINED SEED CROP AND CLEANED SEED COMPETITIONS 

Prince Edward Island 9 $ 658 32 

Nova Scotia 3 226 33 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 29 2.950 00 

Ontario 45 8,842 00 

Manitoba 2 210 00 

Saskatchewan .'. , 1 183 33 

Alberta , 

89 $ 13,069 98 



LOCAL SEED FAIRS 



Prince Edward Island. 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 



6 $ 


366 16 


5 


323 66 


75 


3,711 30 


8 


251 80 


14 


783 85 


28 


1.262 82 



136 % 6.699 59 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 69 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

PROVINCIAL SEED EXHIBITIONS 

Prince Edward Island 

Nova Scotia 1 $ 600 00 

New Brunswick 1 385 00 

Quebec 

Ontorio 2 822 99 

Manitoba 1 600 00 

Saskatchewan 1 495 34 

Alberta ■■■ . 



In the case of British Columbia an annual grant of $2,500 is paid to the 
Department of Agriculture towards encouraging the production and marketing 
of field root and garden seed. The Provincial Department of Agriculture 
authorizes the expenditure of an equal amount for this purpose. 

ASSISTANCE TO CANADIAN SEED GROWERS' ASSOCIATION 

The Canadian Seed Growers' Association is a national organization of 
farmers w-ho specialize in the production of Registered and Extra No. 1 seed. 
They multiply for commerce the foundation stock seeds called " Elite Stock 
Seed " produced by Dominion and Provincial Experiment Stations and some- 
times by individual growers. Registered and Extra No. 1 seed provides much 
of the seed stocks for field crop competitions, local seed fairs and provincial seed 
exhibitions. 

The association office functions as a registration bureau for seeds; maintains 
systematic records of their history, pedigree, disposal and perfonnance; directs 
the work of the growers, and acts as a connecting medium between them and the 
Dominion crop and seed inspection ser\ices; publishes a seed crop catalogue; 
and serves as a clearing office for marketing. 

Complete information as to the work of the association may be obtained 
from their Annual Report published in 1923. Financial support from the Seed 
Branch was continued during the past year to the extent of $10,000. 

The Feed Division 

The Feed Division is primarily concerned with the administration of the 
law governing the sale and inspection of live stock and poultry feeds. Those 
products which are subject to the provisions of the Feeding Stuffs Act are 
divided into three main groups, namely, commercial feeding stuffs, flour mill 
by-products, and chop feeds. 

Commercial feeding stuffs include the numerous ready-mixed feeds offered 
in the trade, many of which are sold under proprietary names. Because of the 
extent to which by-product materials enter into the manufacture of these feeds 
it had become an increasingly difficult problem for purchasers to ascertain their 
true value or worth, or to detect adulterants that might be present. The con- 
trol exercised under the law over manufacturers and their methods of naming, 
labelling and guarant-eeing such products, has had a marked effect in preventing 
fraudulent and misleading practices and in maintaining uniformity in composi- 
tion and quality, and has greatly facilitated the economical purchasing of 
concentrates where feeders have found it neccssarj' to supplement home grown 
fodders. 

In view of the numerous and wide-spread complaints arising out of the 
practices of millers in adulterating their wheat millfeeds with the screenings 
removed from the wheat before milling, special attention has been given to this 
problem. Not only was this practice generally condemned by feeders, but it 



70 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

was a Ptumbling block in the way of the effective standardization of tlie several 
wheat by-products. An amendment to the Feeding StuiTs Act was passed by 
Parliament to correct this situation, and became effective from October 1, 1923. 
This amendment, togetlicr with the regulations thereunder, entirely prohibits the 
adulteration of wheat millfceds with screenings, scourings, or any other foreign 
materials, and standardizes all flour mill by-products both as to name and 
chemical composition, as follows: — 



Name 


Minimum 
protein 


Minimum 
fat 


Maximum 
fibre 


Bran 


p.c. 

1500 
16-00 
16-50 


p.c. 

5-00 
3-50 


p.c. 
11-50 


Shorts 


8-00 




4-50 




2-00 








8-00 











The legal construction placed on this amendment gives it tiie further effect 
of making unlawful the use of pure wheat offal in the manufacture of conmicrcial 
mixed feeds. While such an application has met with both opposition and 
support, according as the interests concerned are affected thereby, there is 
general accord that this provision, insofar as it is necessary to prevent a reversion 
to the former practices of adulterating millfceds with inferior or worthless 
material, should be carefully guarded. 

Investigation as to the classification and quality of screenings removed from 
the western grain crop at the terminal elevators, have been continued. It is 
now the general practice at terminal elevators to reclean these screenings and 
separate them for commerce into several more or less distinct classes of material. 
With the co-operation of the Department of Trade and Commerce, conventional 
standards of quality have been established for the various classes under the 
designations, Standard Recleaned Screenings, Oats Scalpings. Elevator Screenings, 
Refuse Screenings, and all shipments booked out are covered by grain inspectors' 
certificates bearing the grade designation of the material. There is little or no 
market in Canada for screenings which have not been recleaned to remove 
deleterious fine weed seeds and inert matter. The value accruing from the 
establishment of standards is, however, reflected in a domestic demand for the 
recleaned grades, practically equal to the supply. These recleaned grades, while 
sufficiently free from deleterious weed seeds and materials to render them 
palatable and wholesome for stock feeding purposes, nevertheless carrj' sufficient 
weed seeds of western origin to make their transportation to eastern provinces 
in the whole condition a matter for growing concern. 

During the past year representative collections of milling and industrial 
by-products which are commonly employed in the manufacture of commercial 
feeding stuffs, have been assembled and supplied to all the principal agricultural 
colleges and schools throughout the Dominion. 



Markets axd Fertilizer Divi.sign 
market reporting 



Commencing November 21, 1923, seed, feed and fertilizer market reports 
covering Eastern Canada and important American and European markets were 
issued every two weeks in English, and since January first in French. The 
object is to supply farmers and dealers with authoritative information as to 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 71 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

current supply, dcuuind and prices of seed, feed and fertilizer. Interest in these 
reports i.s increasing as their value is becoming known, the mailing list having 
reached 8,000 by March 31. Information for tiiese reports is received from 460 
correspondents in Eastern Canada. Markets information from other countries 
is gathered through the Canadian Government trade commissioners and through 
direct corrcspontlcnce with the Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 
In addition to providing these reports through the mails, weekly summaries of 
seed, feed and fertilizer market conditions are broadcasted from the Canadian 
National Railway radio station, C.K.C.H., Ottawa. 

SEED MARKETS EXTENSION 

The demand from farmers' organizations for information regarding seed 
warehouse plans and machinery continues to increase from year to year. Par- 
ticularly in the seed producing districts of Ontario and the Prairie Provinces, 
farmers' organizations engaged in assembling and distributing farm supplies 
of various kinds are proceeding to reconstruct their warehouses with a view to 
storing, cleaning and sliipping seed. In some districts there is a demand for 
plans and specifications of a small seed elevator suitable for handling local 
seed production co-operatively. Blueprint plans and specifications of this type 
of elevator were prepared by the Public Works Department in conjunction with 
the Seed Branch, and a copy was placed in the office of each county agricultural 
representative of the Provincial Departments of Agriculture. Interested persons 
may study them there free of charge, and if considered suitable for their 
purposes, may procure a complete set from this office at a nominal charge of 
$2. If elevators are constructed, using at least some of the ideas contained 
in these plans, they should prove satisfactory from the standpoints of economy 
and eflBciency in handling seed. 

FERTILIZER REGISTR.\TIONS kSH RENEWALS 

Under the provisions of sections 3 of the Fertilizers Act, 1922, registrations 
and renewals of registrations expire on July first following the date of issue, 
but may be renewed from year to year. 

The total fees collected for registrations and renewals amounted to $7,530. 

The principal kinds of fertilizer for which application for registration was 
made include: — 

(1) chemical fertilizer of different but complete formulae; 

(2) fertilizer carrying organic nitrogen and phosphoric acid of different 
but complete formulae; 

(3) bone fertilizers; 

(4) tankage; 

(5) low grade nitrogen, phosphoric acid and potash materials which are 
not exempt from registration under Section 8 (6) of the Act. 

A Fertilizer Advisory Board meeting was called at Ottawa in July, 1923, 
and on the recommendation of the Board additions were made to the regula- 
tions under the Fertilizers Act. These additional regulations have for their 
purpose the further limitation of the use of brand names and statements of 
guaranteed analyses, with a view to protecting the purchaser against being 
misled in buying fertilizer. Definitions were provided also for fish scrap, bone 
meal, and bone flour. 

The results of analyses of official samples of fertilizer taken during the 
registration year ending July 1, 1923, were published in pamphlet form and 
distributed to interested persons. A total of 430 samples of fertilizer were taken 



72 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

by inspectors and analyzed by the official analysts. Three hundred and fourteen 
of these represented different brands of mixed fertilizer and fertilizer materials 
offered on the market. Based on the results of official analyses compared with 
the guarantees of vendors, the 314 brands may be classified as follows: — 

1. Found to meet requirements of guarantee 97 

2. Found to meet guarantee by compensation 64 

3. Found deficient in excess of legal limits 116 

4. Offered without the guaranteed analysis on the package, label or invoice 24 

5. Offered without being registered as legally required 13 

Total 314 

A surprisingly large number of apparent infractions of the labelling and 
registration provisions of the Act were recorded. These infractions when inves- 
tigated by inspectors were found to be due chiefly to a lack of knowledge of 
the Act and regulations. Court action was taken only in cases where violations 
were of a flagrant nature, as it was the first year of the operation of the 
Fertilizers Act, 1922, and the trade had not yet adjusted its business procedure 
to meet requirements. The publication of the official analyses has supple- 
mented in a marked degree the work of the inspection staff in enforcing the 
Fertilizers Act. From the results of analyses the interested public is able to 
select those firms whose products arc up to their guarantees of analyses. 

In April, 1923, a fertilizer test competition was planned for agricultural 
societies. One was conducted last year by the Brompton Agricultural Society 
of Qucl)ec, and it proved a marked success in tcacliing the fanners how to use 
fertilizers profitably on their own farms. The supervision of the competition 
was exercised jointly by the Seed Branch inspector and the Provincial Govern- 
ment of Quebec. 

Representative fifty-pound lots of practically all the important materials 
used in fertilizer mixtures, and of brands mixed from these materials, were 
gathered for the purpose of putting up educational collections for use in agri- 
cultural schools. These collections witli an explanatory pamphlet are now ready 
for distribution at a nominal charge of ten dollars. 

Makitime District 

This district comprises the three provinces, Prince Edward Island, Nova 
Scotia and New Brunswick. A district office is maintained in the Canadian 
National Railway station building, Truro, N.S. The work is directed by a 
district inspector, and four seasonal inspectors arc employed during the busy 
season, more especially of the seed and fertilizer trade. 

SEED PRODUCTION AND SUPPLY 

The season of 1923, although one of remarkable growth, was not in most 
sections of this district best adapted for the production of farm seeds. Unfav- 
ourable weather delayed ripening, but autumn coming in and continuing fine 
resulted in a good crop of well filled oats and barley in almost every section 
of the Maritime Provinces. The only sections having a shortage of seed oats 
were in the northeastern counties of New Brunswick and parts of Cape Breton. 
Wheat did not develop so well, but in most cases was fit for seed. 

The seetl fairs, with one exception, were held in connection with the com- 
bined seed crop and cleaned seed competitions. In New Brunswick the stand- 
ing field crop competitions will be replaced in 1924 by the combined seed 
crop and cleaned seed competitions, with special attention to seed oats, clover 
seed, and potatoes for seeding purposes. During the past season a combined 
competition was held in one county in oats and in another county in wheat. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 73 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

Tlie only seed fair in tlie province was the Provincial Fair at Fredericton, which 
brought out a good exhibit of seed. In Prince Edward Island combined seed 
crop and cleaned seed competitions were held, one in each of the three counties 
in wheat, oats and barley. Eighty-eight entries produced over 35,000 bushels 
of Banner oats grading Registered and No. 1. At the seed exhibit held during 
" Farmers' Week " at Charlottctown these were over sixty entries of the finest 
Banner oats ever shown in Prince Edward Island, practically every sample 
weighing from forty to forty-three pounds per measured bushel. In Nova 
Scotia there were three combined seed crop and cleaned seed competitions in 
oats, with a total entry of forty-seven. In the Pictou county competition 
every competitor had good clean seed at bin inspection. In Antigonish and 
Inverness counties, owing to bad harvest weather discolouring the grain, only 
a little more than half entered for bin inspection. This seed has all been dis- 
posed of locally. In connection with these competitions two seed fairs were 
held, one at Antigonish and one at Mabou. The Maritime Seed Fair at Amherst, 
while exhibiting a good quality of seed, was not so large as the previous year, 
.owing to tlie very late season delaying the farmers in threshing and cleaning 
their seed. Our inspectors acted as judges at all these fairs, which, with the 
competitions, are conducted by the Provincial Department of Agriculture with 
the financial assistance of the Seed Branch. The district inspector assists in 
training the judges for the competitions. 

Prince Edward Island growers are supplying the seed oats shortage in 
northeastern New Brunswick, w'here, owing to the very dry season and shortage 
in the hay crop, many of the farmers cut the oats green for fodder. They are 
also sending considerable cjuantities to eastern Quebec. Quite a large number 
of orders for Registered seed oats have been filled for eastern Nova Scotia 
iind New Brunswick points. This is largely for seed crop competitions this 
season. 

INSPECTION 

Inspection work is fairly expensive in this somewhat scattered district, 
extending from Sydney to the head of the St. John river in New Brunswick, 
with many towns and villages away from the lines of railways. Last year 1,296 
.visits were, made to points requiring inspection; 1,067 inspections were made 
of seed warehouses, 1,822 of feed, and 154 of fertilizer. There were six suspected 
violations of the Seeds Act, and as these were of a minor nature only one was 
recommended for prosecution, wliich was successfully conducted. Of 169 samples 
of fertilizer analyzed some thirty were slightly to considerably below guarantee. 
Most of these shortcomings apparently occurred through lack of knowledge of 
the Fertilizers Act. One case wa«i recommended for prosecution where the 
vendor seemed inclined to persist in violation of the Act. and he was fined a 
Jiundred dollars. Nearly all fertilizers analyzed later in the season were up to 
standard. Eighteen samples of feeding stuffs were sent in for chemical analysis 
and eight for micro-analysis. Some of these were suspected violations of the 
Act, and as they had their origin with feed manufacturers and milling companies 
in other districts they were turned over to the district inspectors concerned 
,and were dealt with in a satisfactory manner. So far this season our inspectors 
•have inspected and scaled 1.520 bushels of Registered and Extra No. 1 seed; 
19 carloads of oats were inspected and graded No. 1, and one car graded No. 2. 

EDUCATIONAL WORK 

Samples of fertilizer were displayed, copies of the Seeds, Feeding Stuffs, and 
Fertilizer Acts were distributed, and information was given at a Seed Branch 
booth conducted at the Maritime Winter Fair, Amherst. The fertilizer inspector 



74 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

addressed several meetings on the Act and on the general use of fertilizers. The 
district inspector addressed a number of meetings throughout the district, and 
conducted seed judging classes at the short courses which were held at the 
.Agricultural College, Truro, and in People's Schools at Lawrencetown and 
Mabou. At all of these, explanations were given of the three Acts under our 
administration. He and his staff judged at local fall fairs and at school fairs, 
and were always given an opportunity to explain the work of the branch. 

Quebec District 

The inspection personnel of this district consists of a district inspector, with 
headquarters at Quebec city, and six permanent and seasonal inspectors at out- 
,side points. In order to cope with the increase of work on account of the new 
laboratory' established in Quebec during the year, three employees were added 
to the office staff. One of these was an inspector who was brought in during 
the rush season to take charge of grading. 



SEED PRODUCTION .\XD SUPPLY 

Seed production and supply is considered an important part of our work. 
To encourage this. 120 field crop competitions, 75 seed fairs and 40 combined 
competitions were held in the province during the year. There were 4,000 com- 
petitors for the field crop competitions, and 1,182 for the combined competi- 
tions. Through the combined competitions 52,000 bushels of seed oats and 
12,480 pounds of clover seed were produced and tested in the laboratory. They 
graded as follows: — 



— 


Registered 

and 
Extra No. 1 


No. 1 


N-Q. 2 


Ko. 3 


Rejected 


Oats 


% 
6 


66 
10 


% 

10 
17 


% 

5 

22 


% 
13 


Clover 


51 









Over 25,000 bushels of No. 1 seed oats, produced in the combined competi- 
itions in the Montreal district, were marketed in Eastern Quebec at fifteen cents 
per bushel lower than the seed oats offered through the trade, and the growers 
received considerably more than they usually get for oats of the same quality. 

Through an experiment conducted last year in co-operation with the Pro- 
vincial Department of Agriculture, we were able to market this year one car- 
load of Registered and Extra No. 1 Alaska oats. The price obtained for the 
growers was $1.25 per bushel. This has encouraged them to organize for the 
production of this variety which commands a good market. 

A new plan was introduced for the centralization, cleaning and marketing 
of clover and timothy seed in Quebec. A trial was made at Ste-Rosalie with 
two carloads of clover seed shipped by the farmers to the elevator of the co- 
operative society. The results have been satisfactory- for \x)ih the growers and 
tiie society. This plan will enable the growers of clover and grass seed to put 
the^e crops on the market with greater facility, and will result in a greyly 
increased production. 

REGISTERED SEEDS 

Under the new Seeds Act the inspection work of the Canadian Seed 
Growers' Association was transferred from the Provincial Government to the 
Seed Branch. About 4,000 bushels of seed oats were registered, and the same 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 75 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

quantity was rejected on account of the presence of barley and bad colour, the 
latiter being caused by the prevailing bad weather in the Quebec District last 
year. Most of the Registered seed oats was cleaned at Ste-Rosalie under the 
plan established for clover and grass seed. The market for this grade of seed 
was very good and the growers were well satisfied with the service obtained. 

INSPECTION 

The number of points covered by the inspectors during the year was 1,170 
and \-isits were made to 1,308 seed merchants, 1,856 feed, and 219 fertilizer 
merchants. 

With the introduction of the new Seeds Act more attention had to be given 
to the inspection of seed. This Act is so different from the old Seed Control 
Act that it will take two or three years for the dealers and farmers to become 
familiar with its provisions. Tolerance had to be exercised with the trade 
because of their lack of knowledge of this new legislation. The good results, 
however, will soon be felt, as Quebec was often made the dumping ground for 
cheap seeds with tags indicating in small type the presence of weed seeds. 
Several articles were written on tliis particular subject, and reports have come 
from farmers expressing their appreciation of the new Act which compels the 
seed dealer to sell under grade. 

The reports on fertilizer inspection show that improvements have been 
made in the trade over la-st year. The violations were fifty per cent less than 
during pre\nous years, and the farmers are becoming more familiar with the 
different kinds of fertilizers and their relative values. 

Our inspection of feeding stuffs has helped considerably in eliminating 
from the market low grade feeds which were sold at high prices. Although 
very few prosecutions were taken, co-operation from the large mills and 
conscientious dealers has forced out of the market the unscrupulous feed 
dealers who take advantage of the public by misrepresenting the material they 
offer for sale. 

FERTILIZER EXPERIMENTS 

The demonstration organized last year in the county of Richmond, for 
the purpose of showing the farmers tbe kind, value and best way to apply 
fertilizers, is being followed with a lime demonstration. For these demon- 
strations 40 farmers are selected throughout the county. As the soil is very 
acid through that district very good results are expected from the work with 
lime. The fertilizer experiment gave specially good results with potatoes, 
some fields yielding as much as 200 bushels per acre in favour of fertilizer&. 
With the other crops, namely com and roots, there was practically no benefit. 

EDUCATION.VL WORK 

The inspectors attended the seed fairs held in the respective sub-districts 
and gave lectures on the new Seeds Act and the work of the branch. Fertilizers, 
feeding stuffs and seed production were discussed at special meetings through- 
out the district. Several articles were prepared and published in the agricul- 
tural press and weekly papers. Judging was done at tbe provincial seed fair 
and at some of the local fairs. The district inspector attended the monthly 
meetings of the Provincial Seed Board. 



76 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 george v, a. 1925 

Eastern Ontario 

This district comprises eastern Ontario from York county, northern 
Ontario, as far west' as lake Nipigon, the counties of Wright and" Pontiac in 
Quebec. The district inspector has headquarters at Ottawa, and four per- 
manent and seasonal inspectors are conveniently located in the district. 

SEED PRODUCTION AND SXHTLY 

Bad weather prevailed in northeni Ontario for harvesting the grain crops. 
Much of the grain was damaged in colour and some in germination. Through- 
out eastern Ontario and western Quebec dry weather, wliich set in about hay- 
making time, afifected particularly the late sown crops. Oats in many places 
did not fill well, and there was a large percentage of light weighing oats this 
year. The seed, however, proved to be \'ital and there is an adequate supply 
of seed grain. It is probable that in some sections farmers may prefer to feed 
their lighter oats and buy good western oats for seeding purposes. Central 
Ontario had a splendid crop of alsike seed estimated at 100,000 bushels, but 
the red clover seed crop was not so good as last year. A large acreage of red 
clover was saved for seed in eastern Ontario, but the most of it grades only 
No. 2, not on account of weed seeds but rather because of a large percentage 
of brown and shrunken seeds. Considerable quantities of alfalfa seed were 
produced, mostly in central Ontario, but there was a falling-off in sweet clover 
seed production. The barley crop was a ver\- good one. The yield of garden 
peas was below the average on account of the ver>- dr>' weather which pre- 
vailed about blooming time and later affected the development. 

INSPECTION 

During the spring special emphasis is laid on seed and fertilizer inspection. 
More attention is paid to feeding stuffs throughout the rest of the year. Some 
2,340 places were nsitcd and received 2,384 seed inspections, 3.058 feed, and 
12 fertilizer, or a total of 5,079 farchousc inspections. There were discovered 
216 violations of the Seeds Act, most of which were minor offences, 48 feed 
violations, and 4 fertilizer. Four prosecutions were successfully conducted, 
and several other cases were settled by adjustments between the parties con- 
cerned. 

Thirteen agricultural societies carried on the combined competitions. This 
entailed about 200 field and 150 bin inspections. Other inspections were made 
for individual growers engaged in the production of high-class seeds, and the 
following kinds and quantitie.-^ qualified for sealing in sacks: — 







Registered 


Extra No. 1 


Oats 


bushels 

2,633 

446 

132 


bushels 
1.746 






Wheat 






Total 






3.211 


1.746 









EDUCATIONAL WORK 



Educational work was carried on at a number of exhibitions in the dis- 
trict. Assistance was given in conducting the eastern Ontario short course 
in field crop judging at the Central Experimental Farm, and also at a short 



REPORT OP THE MINISTER 77 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

course held at New Liskcard. The seed department of the Ottawa Winter 
Fair was also under our dirpction, and special features was made of a com- 
petition in seed judging open to young farmers in eastern Ontario. 

Western Ontario 

The Western Ontario District comprises that portion of Ontario west of and 
including the couaties of York, Simcoe, Muskoka and Parry Sound. A district 
office and laboratory are maintained in the General Post Office building, Toronto. 
The organization for inspection includes a district inspector and staff at Toronto, 
with four permanent and seasonal inspectors stationed at convenient points in 
the district. 

SEED PRODUCTION AND SUPPLY 

Western Ontario is well adapted for the production of seed wheat, oats, 
barley, rye, buckwheat, peas, beans, corn, alsike, sweet clover, red clover, alfalfa 
and blue grass. In 1923 the alsike crop was above average, which increased the 
amount of seed available for export. Sweet clover is used largely for pasture 
and for ploughing under. Much of the seed has been exported and the supply 
wliich remains is not more than equal to the demand. Red clover was not a 
heavy crop and some imported seed will be required for the 1924 seeding. The 
alfalfa seed crop was the largest in the history of the district. The production 
of this seed has increased enormously. There is a sufficient amount of high 
quality seed to supply the assured heavy demand for seeding in Ontario, and 
some has been sold for export. The Peel County Alfalfa Seed Producers' 
Association offered for sale 3,500 bushels of No. 1 and 320 bushels of No. 2 seed, 
which was grown by sixty farmers. An average crop of blue grass seed for the 
district is estimated to be 96,000 bushels, and most of this is sold for export. 

Large areas are devoted to the production of Dent and Flint corn, and a 
large percentage of the crop is saved as seed. Ontario grown seed corn is 
increasing in favour and in normal years the district will produce sufficient to 
supply the demand. The 1923 seed corn crop was much below normal. It 
suffered from early frosts and when harvested the grain was comparatively 
immature and contained a high percentage of moisture. During the early and 
mid-winter seasons hea\y frosts seriously affected the vitality of the seed. The 
supply of good seed is therefore limited, and the amount of No. 1 grade is not 
sufficient to meet the demand. A considerable quantity will be offered as No. 
2 and No. 3 grades. 

Competitors of the combined seed crop competitions and members of the 
Canadian Seed Growers' Association produced large quantities of good seed 
grain, most of which graded No. 1. A satisfactory portion was suitable to seal 
in sacks as Registered or Extra No. 1, and the production of these grades of 
seed will be greatly increased during the coming year. 

INSPECTION 

During the year 1,054 visits were made to points requiring inspection; 3,321 
warehouses were visited, namely, seed 2,096, feed 1,529, and fertilizer 118; 
1,083 complaints were received including 316 seed, 591 feed, and 176 fertilizer. 
The number which proved to be suspected violations were, seed 78, feed 212, and 
fertilizer 48. There were 19 prosecutions under the Seed Control Act and 2 
prosecutions under the Feeding Stuffs Act. Many of the violations were of a 
minor nature, in which case a warning has been issued and a record kept. 

There was a decided increase in the number of field and bin inspections on 
account of various combined seed crop and cleaned seed competitions and 



78 



DEPARTMENT OF AGIilCULTURE 



15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

organized associations for the production and sale of certified seed. Inspections 
were made of 175 fields of alfalfa, 317 fields of corn, 312 fields of oats, and 1 
field of barley. There were 264 bin inspections, alfalfa 22, corn 38, and oats 
204. 

Seed inspected and sealed under grade: — 



— 


Registered 


Extra No. 1 


No. 1 


No. 2 




bushels 

646 
214 


bushels 
2,384 


.bushels 


bushels 


Barley 






Flax . . .... 




2,08.5 
3,090 




Alfalfa 






352 










Total 


860 


2.384 


5,175 


352 



There is an increasing demand for the better grades of seed, for standard 
feeds, and for fertilizers of superior value. The quality of cereals offered by 
farmers for local seeding is much improved and will be a strong factor towards 
increasing cereal production. Bran, shorts, middlings, feed flour, crushed oats, 
and screenings particularly are considerably improved in quality. Standard 
Recleaned Screenings have been purchased for feeding, but elevator screenings 
and refuse screenings are not in demand. Oats Scalpings are used sparingly 
as compared with Standard Recleaned Screenings. 



EDUCATIONAL WORK 

The district inspector was president of the Ontario Provincial Winter Fair, 
acted as judge of com at the Essex Corn Improvement Association Exhibition 
and at the Peninsular Winter Fair, and as judge of seeds at most of the leading 
exhibitions. The permanent inspectors acted as judges at many of the seed fairs 
in the local districts, and delivered addresses on subjects pertaining to seeds, 
feeds and fertilizers. 

Exhibits of seed at the Royal Winter Fair and the Ontario Provincial Winter 
Fair were sampled, analyzed and graded at the laboratory in Toronto as a basis 
for judging. Premiums were not awarded on seed which did not grade. 

The annual meetings of the Ontario Fairs and Exhibitions and the Ontario 
Field Crop and Seed Growers' Associations were attended and addresses were 
delivered pertaining to seed growing. Addresses on production and judging of 
seed were given at Junior Farmers .Association meetings. Merchants, manu- 
facturers and farmers have visited the office at Toronto and received information 
and advice concerning the production, manufacture and sale of seed, feed and 
fertilizer, and the laws governing them. Inspectors have addressed meetings on 
the combined seed competitions, and made suggestions with regard to the sowing, 
harvesting, threshing, cleaning and grading of seed to be offered for sale. At 
several points addresses were given on the seeds. Feeding Stuffs and Fertilizers 
Acts. The inspection staff has worked in co-operation with the district repre- 
sentatives and other provincial officials in the production of seed, particularly 
alfalfa and corn. 

Manitoba and Saskatchewan 

This district extends eastward into Ontario as far as lake Nipigon. The 
district office and laboratory are located at 173 Portage avenue East, Winnipeg. 
Sub-offices are maintained at 216 Grain Exchange building, Fort William, and 
Post Office building, Regina, with a permanent inspector at each. In addition 
four seasonal inspectors are employed with headquarters at Winnipeg, Brandon, 
Saskatoon and Moose Jaw. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 79 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

SKED I'KODUCTION AND SUPPLY 

Favourable weather prevailed during the 1923 season, resulting in heavy 
grain crops in Saskatchewan and northern Manitoba. Southwestern Saskatche- 
wan had some trouble with grasshoppers which were successfully combatted. 
Southeastern Saskatchewan and more particularly southern Manitoba suffered 
seriously from rust, and heavy crops yielded poorly. On this account pro- 
duction of Regitered wheat in Manitoba was almost nil, but a surplus was pro- 
duced in Saskatchewan. 

The seed centre idea is being fostered by the Saskatchewan Department 
of Agriculture and tiie university, with several districts specializing in seed wheat, 
oats, barley, sweet clover, millets and brome grass. In Manitoba .-^ced centres 
are being developed with sweet clover, alfalfa, corn and oats, and in northern 
Ontario are well known centres at Oxdrift and Emo. With the exception of 
Oxdrift the cleaning and marketing problem is causing seed growers concern 
and is being studied by a committee in each province. 

During the year there developed a sliortage of red clover, sweet clover, 
barley and flax. There was a plentiful supply of wheat and oats, and an 
increased amount of local grown corn, millet, etc. Interested districts in each 
province have been organized for the production of early seed corn. 

Saskatchewan secured sweepstakes and second place for barley at the 
Chicago International. 

Six combined field crop and cleaned seed competitions with wheat were 
successfully conducted in Saskatchewan, one with wheat and one with oats 
in Manitoba, and one .seed oat competition at Emo, Ont. 

New diseases are becoming a source of anxiety, basal glume rot being 
prevalent on wheat in the northern half of both provinces. 

INSPECTION 

Points requiring inspection received 722 visit*. Stores and warehouse 
inspections were made for seed, 2,323, and for feed, 1,030. There were 63 sus- 
pected seed violations and 52 suspected feed violations. Two farmers and one 
company were prosecuted under the Seed Control Act. A Winnipeg milling 
company was prosecuted under the Feeding Stuffs Act for selling oats scalpings 
as No. 2 Oat Chop. 

Inspectors reported fewer carload shipments of seed than usual, also less 
bulk seed stocked by retailers. On the whole there was improvement in quality 
and reasonable observance of regulations. Farmers are found selling seed 
without grade in violation of section 3 of the Seeds Act, 1923. The new Act 
resulted in an increased number of samples for laboratory test and grade. 

Contrary to expectations, corn imported into this district for 1924 seeding 
proved of fairly high vitality, perhaps due to careful buying and the desire 
of our seedsmen to handle No. 1 grade. Importations of carrot, parsnip and 
spinach cleared customs by narrow margins of vitality, and a few lots were 
deported. Some lots of vegetable seed had to be cleaned to remove noxious 
weed seeds before being released by customs officials. Customs receipts totalled 
3,293,520 pounds. 

Inspection of crops for registration by the Canadian Seed Growers' Asso- 
ciation necessitated visits to 172 districts and over 300 farms, representing 
19,000 acres of wheat, oats, barley, flax, rye and other seed crops. Only a 
small percentage of growers applied for seed inspection and sealing in sack. 
Slow clemand, faulty system of cleaning and marketing, resulted in sales as 
ordinary grain for ready cash. 



80 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



Inspections to March 31:- 







Registered 


Extra No. 1 


Wheat 


bushels 

10,322 

5,384 

150 

60 


bushels 
1,538 




2,150 






Flai 






Total 






15,916 


3,688 









Feed manufacturers and dealers under close observation show improvement 
in quality of products and in tendency to observe the law. A close check on 
screenings particularly at Fort William indicated Standard Recleaned Screen- 
ings ancl Oats Scalpings to be of satisfactory quality. The inspector stationed 
at Fort William saw a sample of every shipment, and informed district inspectors 
regarding quality and necessary particulars of shipments en route to their 
districts. 

EDUC.^TIOX.U. WORK 

The district inspector attended the annual meeting of the Canadian Seed 
Growers' Association and led in the discussion of a paper on seed control. He 
attended the provincial seed fairs and acted as judge at Eaton's Exposition 
of Western Canada Farm Products. The Branch had a booth at Eaton's 
Exposition in which to demonstrate and meet the public. Meetings of seed 
growers were addressed by the district inspector. Several local meetings were 
addressed by field inspectors and a lecture was given to the students at 
Saskatoon. 

Courses were arranged at the Manitoba and Saskatchewan Agricultural 
Colleges for men going out on crop inspection work. Following a staff con- 
ference at Ottawa the district inspector called together his field staff to review 
and plan their work and reach a better understanding of the new Seeds Act. 

Albert.\ .4ND British Columbu 

The organization in this district includes an inspection office and a seed 
laboratory at Calgary. The chemical analysis of feeds and fertilizers is per- 
formed by an official analyst at the University of Alberta, Edmonton. The trade 
is controlled by a district inspector, two permanent inspectors, one in each 
province, and four seasonal inspectors. The permanent inspector in British 
Columbia is also a seed production specialist. 



SEED PRODUCTION AND SUPPLY 

Interest in the production of pure seed by farmers in Alberta has continued 
to increase. Growers now realize that if they are going to obtain the highest 
grade of commercial grain and thus secure the highest price, they must sow 
only pure varieties of grain. Alberta growers again brought distinction to the 
province and to Canada in securing so many high awards at the Chicago Hay 
and Grain Show. Major H. G. L. Strange won first placing and the Grand 
Championship in wheat, while another grower in the extreme north, at Grande 
Prairie, secured third. The same grower who secured highest awards in oats 
last year, Mr. J. W. Biglands, Lacomhe, took first place and Grand Champion- 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 



81 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

ship again tiiis year. Tiiis honour has been captured by our growers for four 
con.secutive years. Nunemakcr Brotlicrs, Brooks, captured highest honours on 
red clover seed, and Major Strange secured first place on yellow field peas. 
In all, our growers secured twenty-two out of thirty-five prizes in oats, five 
prizes in wheat, one in red clover, two in timothy, three in alfalfa, three in field 
peas, one in Durum wheat, one in white winter wheat, four in barley, one in 
rye, and one in flax. Such a large number of awards has been an excellent 
advertisement for Alberta, as it is recognized that this exhibition is unquestion- 
ably the best of its kind in the world. All Alberta growers competing in the 
cereal classes showed registered seed and are members of the Alberta Seed 
Growers' Association. 

Field inspections were made for all growers of registered grain. Through 
the kind co-operation of the University of Alberta and t!ie Provincial Depart- 
ment of Agriculture we were able to secure qualified officials to assist our 
inspectors in this work. A total of 375 inspections were made (.f cereal crops 
and 1S2 of crops of (irimm alfalfa. Our inspectors graded as Registered and 
Extra No. 1 the following kinds and quantities of seed: — 



— 


Variety 


Registered 


Extra No. 1 


Wheat 


Ruby 


bushels 

2,. 528 
l.S,.')47 

9,6,50 

16,751 

640 


bushels 

172 


Oats 


Marquis 


3.313 






5,645 




Bark's 








Totals 


48,116 











AjDproximately four-fifths of this grain was cleaned and marketed through 
the provincial seed cleaning plant at Edmonton. The Provincial Government 
provided this plant and operate it for the benefit of the growers. Representa- 
>tives from the executive of the Alberta Seed Growers' Association and from the 
Dominion and Provincial Seed Departments form the Provincial Seed Board, 
.which acts in an advisory capacity in the operating of this plant and the 
marketing of seed. The experiment has worked very satisfactorily and has 
made it possible to place on the market a uniform quality of seed, which has 
undoubtedly been largely responsible for the success that our growers have 
attained in the profitable marketing of their product. 

The season was very unfavourable for alfalfa seed, but about 100,000 
pounds were produced, of which the following quantities have been inspected: — 



— 


Variety 


Registered 


Extra No. 1 


Alfalfa 




pounds 
14,961 


pounds 
4,940 







Approximately 440,000 pounds of timothy seed were produced, and of this 
amount the Pincher Creek district produced and marketed 212,000 pounds. 

The United Seed Growers, Penticton, have been able to liquidate all their 
old indebtedness which was incurred during the war years. This organiza- 
tion is not, however, receiving the support of the majority of the seed growers 
in British Columbia, and it has been recommended to the Provincial Govem- 
jnent that they take over their plant and run it in a similar manner to the 
16—6 



82 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

^S GEORGE V, A. 1925 

operating of the cleaning plant by the Alberta Government. The following 
quantities of seed were produced: — 

Pounds 

Peas (canners) 132.016 

Peas (garden) 39. 798 

Beans (gjirden) 8,000 

Carrot (garden) 250 

Onion 4. 12.5 

Swede turnip 711 

Mangel 6.210 

Sweet corn 10. 100 

Other small seeds 500 

The growers are preparing to produce Registered and Extra No. 1 seed, 
as it is realized that only by producing the highest grades can a satisfactorj' 
profit be made. Recognition has already been given to 240 pounds of Sludstrup 
mangel seed which was graded Extra No. 1. 

INSPECTION 

Inspectors made 641 visits to 350 towns and cities, making 2.033 inspec- 
tions. Tiic inspections covered 843 seed dealers, 721 feed dealers, 82 fertilizer 
dealers, 49 feed manufacturing plants, and 14 fertilizer manufacturing plants. 
It was found necessary to have only one prosecution under the Seeds Act and 
one under the Feeding Stuffs Act. Inspectors have been giving a great deal 
of attention to educating seed merchants and dealers in regard to the new 
requirements under the Seeds Act, 1923. Merchants who understand the Act 
have expressed themselves as heartily approving the new requirements, which 
place recognition on the highest quality of seed. 

The inspectors submitted 57 samples of fertilizers for analyses by the official 
analyst. The results indicate that many manufacturers were putting out fer- 
tilizers inferior in quality to their guarantee. This appears to have been done 
through a misunderstanding of the requirements, and efforts are being directed 
to educating the manufacturers in this connection. 

They have also submitted for chemical analyses 138 samples of feeding 
stuffs. Because of the changes made during the year in the Feeding Stuffs 
Act with regard to the mixing of flour mill by-products, there has been great 
opposition especially from the smaller manufacturers who mix for the retail 
trade. Millers are found to be manufacturing within the requirements. 

EDUCATIONAL WORK 

The district inspector again acted as chairman of the Provincial Seed 
Board, also as vice-president of the Alberta Seed Growers' Association. These 
organizations endeavour to promote interest in seed production, and act in an 
advisory capacity to growers and to the Provincial Government in regard to 
the seed cleaning plant operations, the marketing of seed, the holding of local 
^nd provincial seed fairs, standing field crop and cleaned seed competitions. 
It was considered advisable to defer the establishing of another provincial seed 
cleaning plant in southern Alberta, but the one at Edmonton was operated day 
and night. Two seed inspectors were provided for this work. 

A Provincial Seed Board has also been organized for British Columbia. 
The local seed inspector is a member of this Board and the district inspector 
is an honorary member. At the request of the Provincial Department of Agri- 
culture the Board is making a complete survey of the possibilities in the pro- 
duction and marketing of seed, and when full particulars are available some 
-changes may be made in the present arrangement of giving assistance to seed 
production. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 83 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

The alfalfa growers in the Brooks district have organized into the Grimm 
Alfalfa Seed Growers' Association of Alberta, Limited, and with the assistance 
of the Canadian Pacific Railway have erected a seed cleaning plant valued at 
ten thousand dollars and equipped with the most modern cleaning machinery. 

The timothy growers in the Pincher Creek district are organized as the 
Pinchcr Creek Co-operative Growers' Association and have this year installed 
their own cleaning machinery', which arrangement is working much more satis- 
factorily than the former one of shipping seed for cleaning at the Government 
elevator, Calgary. 

Great interest has been aroused in the production of seed corn in the south- 
eastern part of Alberta. Growers arc finding that if proper strains arc secured, 
profitable crops can be harvested. It is the intention to hold a provincial com 
show at Medicine Hat this coming year to stimulate interest in this direction. 

The district inspector judged and gave addresses at the provincial seed 
fair? in Alberta and British Columbia, and attended several meetings through- 
out the district in the interests of seed production. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL BRANCH 

The w^ork of the Entomological Branch, in addition to the administration of 
the Destructive Insect and Pest Act, comprised investigations relating to insects 
affecting field and garden crops, forest and shade trees, fruit crops, greenhouse 
and ornamental plants, live stock, etc. The officers attached to the Division of 
Field Crop and Garden Insects, Division of Forest Insects, Division of Foreign 
Pests Suppression and Division of Systematic Entomology, have all had a very 
active year as a result of w^hich the department is in possession of further 
important information on the life habits and control of many of our important 
insect pests. 

Under the direction of the Dominion Entomologist, the Regulations under 
the Destructive Insect and Pest Act have been administered in so far as they 
refer to insect pests. The following amendments to the regulations, relating 
to in.sects. were passed during the year April 1, 1923, to March 31, 1924. 

By Order in Council parsed on ALny 31, 1923, the Order in Council passed 
on May 21, 1922, was amended by adding tlie additional territory in the United 
States found to be infested by the European corn borer. 

By Order in Council passed on June 26, 1923, the Regulations under the 
Destructive Insect and Pest Act, as established by Order in Council on July 17, 
1917, and all amendments thereto, were rescinded, as on the first day of Septem- 
ber, 1923, and revised regulations substituted therefor, which now appear as 
general regulations, foreign regulations and domestic regulations. 

Division of Field Crop and Garden Insects 

In the Prairie Provinces a further outbreak of grasshoppers occurred in 
1923, particularly in the province of Alberta. These insects were materially 
reduced in Saskatchewan and Manitoba by the presence of natural enemies and 
disease. In British Columbia outbreaks were also investigated by our officers 
and systematic collections of species made, demonstrations in mixing and distri- 
buting poisoned baits given, and information generally disseminated at farmers' 
meetings. In this latter province it has been established that by a proper 
rotation of the range lands the native vegetation is not seriously damaged by 
grasshoppers alone. The work of our officers is being supported by the Depart- 
ment of Lands for British Columbia so that a proper system of range rotation 
may be effected by the owners of stock, horses and sheep. One may expect that 
16— 6i 



84 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

in due course the immense range areas of the interior section of British Columbia 
will be enabled to carr>- a greater quantity of stock in the years to come with 
little depletion of the native vegetation. 

Reports received from our officers indicate that the western wheat-stem 
sawflv now occurs in practically all of the wheat growing areas of Manitoba, 
and further, that it has extended its ranges in Saskatchewan and Alberta. The 
farmers in infested areas are recognizing the value of cutting the grain on the 
green side; in other words four or five days ahead of the regular time of cutting. 
Losses by this insect in Manitoba, while of a serious nature in 1923, were not so 
widespread or important as in 1922, being due in many localities to the saving of 
the crop by cutting it on the green side. 

The infestation of the European com borer has been further studied and 
" clean-up " campaigns among farmers were organized in Elgin county, Ontario, 
early in the spring and autumn of 1923 to demonstrate the value of green 
farming in the control of this insect. Biological studies were oarried on at Port 
Stanley, Harrow, and other points in southwestern Ontario to discover any 
possible variations in the life-history of the borer. The advent of this insect 
into the corn growing areas has brought verj' clearly to the front the absolute 
necessity of properly disposing of crop remnants. Better ploughing methods 
at stat€d inten-als in the course of the year are being adopted and selective 
planting of corn is being practiced. These agricultural methods, while bearing 
upon the control of the European corn borer, are undoubtedly indirectly respon- 
sible for the control of other insect pests and for the better cultivation of crops. 
In the area which our officers have used for demonstration purposes there has 
been during the last two years a marked reduction in the corn borer infestation, 
and in areas where fields of corn were very seriously damaged in 1921, practi- 
cally no commercial injury has since occurred. The insect, however, has spread 
into new townships at the present time. One hundred and seventy townships in 
Ontario are infested, covering an area of 13,266 square miles. 

In the province of Alberta the control of the pale western cutworm has been 
the major problem for a number of years. An intensive study has been under- 
taken by our officers and we are now able to predict in large measure where 
serious damage is likely to occur on the basis of rainfall during the previous 
season. Furthermore, satisfacton,- control measures have been established in 
the matter of soil cultivation or the withholding of cultural operations in certain 
seasons of the year which harmonize with the life-history of the insect. This, 
of course, has resulted in much saving of crop in the southern sections of the 
province where recommendations have been especially made. 

In the alfalfa regions of Alberta, the alfalfa thrips and the alfalfa seed 
chalcid are both assuming important proportions. The study of these two insects 
is only commencing but sufficient has been established to indicate that an early 
clipping of alfalfa, two or three weeks earlier than normally occurs, is sufficient 
to control these insects in alfalfa fields without endangering the yield of hay or 
seed. 

Other investigations carried on by oflBcers of this Division related to the 
cabbage butterfly, root maggots, flea beetles, wireworms, potato insects, etc. 

Division of Forest Insects 

Important studies of the spruce budworm have been completed and are soon 
to be published. In 1923, the officers of this Division obtained additional data 
from the dead timber in different localities. Active budworm injur>- was not 
-found in 1923 in Quebec or in tlie Maritime Provinces. A small outbreak was 
investigated in the Rainy River district of Ontario. Our recommendations regard- 
ing future outbreaks of this insect relate to the removal of mature balsam trees 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 85 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

and sipociul methods of lumbering suitable to the locations, with a view to main- 
taining a healthy vigorous stand of timber tliroughout all eastern eoniferous 
forests. 

The study of the eastern spruce bark beetle in the Gaspe peninsula of 
Quebec has been continued and this has included surveys in infested areas as 
a result of which recommendations have been made to lumber companies con- 
cerncni. This investigation will be continued while the opportunity is at hand 
so that needed information will be available for the future as well as during 
the continuance of the present outbreaks. 

Control work in connection with the pine bark beetles in British Columbia 
was continued in 1923 in co-operation with the Provincial Forest Branch. This 
control work has already saved an immense amount of valuable timber and it 
is expected that this co-operative work will continue so as to include all the 
infested yellow pine stands in British Columbia, as well as infestations in other 
timber trees. In August, 1923, an entomologist was appointed to conduct 
investigations in shade tree insects in the Prairie Provinces and a laboratory 
for this work was established at Indian Head, Sask. This work is being con- 
ducted in co-operation with the Dominion Forestry Branch and the Dominion 
•Experimental Farms Branch. These investigations will cover: (1) a general 
survey of the situation with respect to insects affecting shade trees, (2) detailed 
enquiry into the most important and the most urgent problems and (3) methods 
of control. Our officer made a survey of the forest tent caterpillar outbreaks 
in 1923 in southern Saskatchewan and southern and western Alberta south of 
Edmonton. A study of shade tree insects has also been continued in eastern 
Canada, particularly at the forest insect laboratory near Aylmer, Que. The 
establishment of forest sample plots in various sections of eastern Canada has 
brought together a vast amount of valuable information regarding the injury 
caused by insects and other enemies. During 1923, further new plots were laid 
out in the provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec. 

An exhaustive study of wood borers in fire-killed timber and logs has been 
incepted in the province of New Brunswick and already through studies made 
by our officers important recommendations have been made which resulted in 
,savings to the New Brunswick Crown Lands Department of many thousands of 
dollars in stumpage dues. 

Other investigations conducted by officers of this division related to the 
satin moth, the larch sawfly, Douglas fir beetle, lodge pole pine beetle, etc. 

Division of Foreign Pests Suppression 

Tiie work of the officers of this di^^sion has to do with the immediate 
enforcement of the regulations under the Destructive Insect and Pest Act in 
so far as insect pest's are concerned. On account of the revised regulations 
under this Act, effective September 1, 1923, the work regarding enforcement 
has increased greatly. This work includes the issuance of permits for proposed 
importations of nursery stock from all foreign countries; the importation of 
nursen,- stock entering Canada from all countries otlier than the United States; 
the super\-ision of inspection headquarters at the impwrtation ports maintained 
at St. John, N.B.; Montreal, Que.; Niagara Falls, Ont. ; Ottawa, Ont., and Van- 
couver, B.C., the establishment and maintenance of quarantines and embargoes 
against foreign pests, studies of foreign pests likely to be introduced into 
Canada, etc. This work, which is largely of a preventive nature, has increased 
considerably during 1923. Not only have our officers been concerned in the 
examining of imported nursery stock to discover such pests as the gipsy moth, 



66 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

browTi tail moth and other insects which are carried on such stock, but they 
have also been conducting important scouting work within Canada as a result 
of which the spread of such pests as the European apple sucker and the Euro- 
pean com borer have been prevented. As has pre\nously been pointed out, 
experience has shown the necessity for preventing as far as possible the intro- 
duction and spread of destructive pests and diseases. In the case of the 
European com borer particularly, the double quarantine which has been placed 
on Aliddlesex and Elgin counties in Ontario has undoubtedly added ver\- con- 
siderably in confining the serious outbreak of the corn borer in these sections 
of the province. The movement of corn from these counties is absolutely for- 
bidden. 

During the importation season of 1922-23 a total of 2,883,122 plants 
classed as nursery stock entered Canada from France, Belgium, Holland, Great 
Britain, Japan, Italy, Luxemburg, Gcmiany, Poland and United States. All 
of these plants were examined by inspectors and 71 shipments were found to 
be infested with foreign pests. The value of plants, trees, shmbs, %ines and 
florists stock, but not including cutflowers, imported into Canada for the year 
ending March 31, 1923, was $928,078. 

The new fumigation and inspection building established jointly by the 
Federal Department of Agriculture and the Provincial Department of Agri- 
culture for British Columbia was completed in the spring of 1923. It is one of 
the most modern plant inspection buildings in existence. 

The new regulations under the Destructive Insect and Pest Act which 
went into effect September 1, 1923, require all importers of nursery stock which 
includes trees, shrubs, \'ines. roots, perennials, green house plants, etc., to secure 
permits. All plants and plant products from countries other than the United 
States are subject' to inspection. 

The Dominion Entomologist is Chairman of the Destructive Insect and 
Pest Act Advisory Board and the Chief of the Division of Foreign Pests Sup- 
pression is the Secretary'. 

The European apple sucker has been spreading gradually in Nova Scotia 
each season. Scouting is carried on annually to determine this spread and all 
infested areas are placed tmder quarantine. No nurserj' stock may be trans- 
ported unless it is accompanied by either a certificate or a permit. The total 
area now infested by the apple sucker covers 3.750 square miles. During 1923, 
237 certificates and 311 permits were issued for the movement of 103,381 
plants. 

Scouting for the gipsy moth was continued in tlie province of Quebec 
in the fall of 1923, the area investigated being adjacent to the international 
boundaries of New Hampshire and Vermont. This was done on account of 
the gradual spread northward of this pest. Early in October, a ver>' serious 
infestation of the gipsy moth, comprising about 5,000 egg clusters was found 
in Albany township, Vt., one half mile from the Quebec boundary. To assist 
in this scouting work two trainee! scouts were kindly fumished by the United 
States Department of Agriculture. No egg masses of the gipsy moth have as 
3-et been found in Quebec province. 

The brown tail motli suppression work in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia 
was continued during the year. In New Brunswick no nests were found. In 
Nova Scotia 492 nests were found in 1922-23, as compared with 979 collected 
the pre\'ious season. 

In the province of Alberta in 1923, scouting for the alfalfa wee\'il was 
continued. A total of 491 farms were visited. As yet no specimens of this 
important p>est have lieen discovered in Canada. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 87 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

The Division of Systematic Entomology 

The maintenance and building up of the National Collection of Insects con- 
stituted the main activities of the officers of the Division of Systematic Ento- 
mology. During the summer months the time of the divisional staff is largely 
spent in making faunal collections of much interesting material. As a result 
of these activities more than 30,000 specimens were added in 1923 to the National 
Collection. During the year, 150 species of insects new to science have been 
described and types of these deposited in the collection. The value of the 
National Collection is becoming more and more apparent. Field officers of the 
Entomological Branch are now able to secure prompt and reliable determinations 
of insects occurring in their respective localities. Frequently these are of 
decided economic importance. Schools and other institutions have also during 
the year availed themselves frequently of the services of our entomologists. 

Important studies have been made of the Ephemcrid fauna of Canada, 
which insects are of considerable economic importance as food for fish. Furthar 
studies have also been made of Canadian Tabanida?, known commonly as horse- 
flies. Other important studies have been made in the Tortricidae (leaf-rollers), 
many species of which are of economic importance; Diptera, particularly the 
Asiladae (robber-flies) ; Syrphidse (hovering-flies) ; Aphididae (plant lice) ; Orthop- 
tera (grasshoppers); Thysanoptera (thrips), etc. 

N.\TURAL Control In\t:stigations 

Through the courtesy of the United States Department of Agriculture in 
furnishing our officers with breeding material of an important parasite of the 
European corn borer, imported from France, excellent progress was made in 
building up a strong colony of the parasite in 1923 at our St. Thomas, Ont., 
laboratory. This parasite known as Habrobracon brevicornis is a very active 
one and during the year, from the original breeding stock 585,000 adults were 
reared and liberated in the more heavily infested corn borer districts of Ontario. 
As an indication of the work necessary' in breeding this material, it is of interest 
to state that it was necessary to collect by hand approximately 50,000 corn 
borer larvae to ser\'e as hosts for the parasite. 

The predatorj' mite, Hemisnr copies mains, introduced into British Columbia 
in 1917, to prey upon the oyster shell scale, has been found to have practically 
exterminated the scale upon the trees in certain sections on which it was intro- 
duced. Recent examination of adjacent areas indicates that the mites are 
numerous and that they have become well established in surrounding orchards 

In Nova Scotia, the apple sucker fungus, Entomophthora sphcerosperma, 
has had considerable attention and much progress was made in the artificial 
spread of this fungus. For the first time in history this disease was grown 
artificially in cages and then spread from such cages into orchards infested by 
the apple sucker. By this means an epidemic was started among the apple 
suckers, nearly a month earlier than had been possible the previous year. The 
artificial spread of the apple sucker fungus in the Annapolis Valley, Nova 
Scotia, particularly in tliat section with Wolfville, as a centre, contributed to 
an important degree in increasing the apple crop in such section where many 
large orchards are located. 

Further important data has been secured regarding the natural control of 
the large larch sawfly, tent caterpillar and other important pests. 

Fruit Insect Investigations 

During 1923, an important study of the codling moth in the province of 
Ontario was incepted, having for its chief object the discovery of a simple means 
of determining at what time the application of a " cover " spray will give 



88 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

maximum results in preventing tiie injury known as " side-worm " injurj'. This 
investigation involves, among other things, a prolonged careful study of the effect 
of meteorological factors on the behaviour of the insect. During 1923, a marked 
increase of the fruit-tree leaf-roller was noted in the province of British 
Columbia. Control investigations have been concerned largely with estab- 
lishing the value of miscible oil sprays. Much important information has been 
secured on the life-history of this insect. 

In the province of Quebec our officers have demonstrated the control of the 
apple maggot under commercial conditions by spraying trees in infested orchards 
with lead arsenate or calcium arsenate mixtures. Orchards in which the fruit 
two years ago was wholly destroyed by the pest, in 1923, gave excellent returns. 
The Fameuse aple is a variety commonly attacked by this insect, the maggot of 
which makes tunnels through the flesh, rendering the fruit unfit for use. 

The apple curculio and the plum curculio have again required attention, the 
former in Quebec province and the latter in Ontario, as well as Quebec. Obser- 
vations have been continued and further evidence of the value of arsenate of 
lead sprays at certain definite periods has been obtained. The control of both 
of these orchard pests is very similar. 

In the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia, the blister mite of apple ha« 
developed into an important pest. During 1923, experiments were conducted 
jointly with the Provincial Horticultural Department. This work has demon- 
strated under commercial conditions the value of dormant applications of lime 
sulpliur (1-9), during a period in spring, to destroy the overwintering mites 
upon the bud scales. 

Due to a publicity campaign conducted in the Niagara district of Ontario, 
in co-operation with the grape growers, most of the vineyards infested with the 
grape leaf hopper were sprayed in 1923 and tlic outbreak was, to a verj' marked 
extent, brought under control. As a result of tlie investigations conducted by 
our officers the method of combating leaf hoppers has been perfected to such 
an extent that hopper injury can not only be prevented but the insect them- 
selves can be reduced to absolutely insignificant numbers. 

In the province of Ontario a special study of the rose chafer was under- 
taken. As a result of our control experiments it was again proved that severe 
^njury by the insect to grapes, cherries, etc., can be prevented by proper spray- 
ing. Severe outbreaks of this insect occurred in most of the sandy sections of 
southwestern Ontario. 

Other important fruit insect investigations related to the biology and con- 
trol of the strawberry root weevil, various bush fruit insects, etc. 

IXSECTICIDF. iNn-ESTIC^TIONS 

Important developments have taken place particularly with regard to 
improved and cheaper dusts and this work has meant large savings to many 
sections. Important progress was made in Nova Scotia in connection with the 
control of plant lice on truck crops through the application of nicotine impreg- 
nated dusts, requiring the invention and construction of suitable apparatus 
and methods of application. 

The apple maggot, one of the worst pests of the apple is usually controlled 
by power sprays. In' 1923, in Nova Scotia, our officers succeeded in perfecting 
a much more rapid and effective method of control through the use of a 
specially prepared poisoned dust. In 1922. growers in the Annapolis Valley 
in certain sections lost many thousands of barrels of apples through the rav- 
ages of this insect, whereas by applying the dust recommended in 1923, no 
damage from the insect resulted and the trees bore excellent crops. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 89 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

Studies on the control of the strawberrj' weevil have proved successful 
and our officers are now able to recommend satisfactory control measures for 
this troublesome pest. A series of experiments for the perfection of sheep dips 
was commenced in 1923. Considerable time is devoted each season to the 
study and testing of standard insecticides sold on the market. 

MosQxnro Investig.^tions 

Further investigational and control work was conducted at Banff, Alberta, 
in 1923, in co-operation with the Dominion Parks Branch of the Department 
of the Interior. Control operations were undertaken from April 16 to Sep- 
tember 15. and during this period most of the time of an expert entomologist 
was taken up in supervision. Applications to mosquito breeding places of an 
improved oil for killing the larva; were made as required and this method 
of control was the one especially practised. On the whole, fairly satisfactory 
control of the mosquito pest in the Banff district was obtained. 

Live Stock Ix.sect Investigations 

A special study of insects affecting live stock was undertaken during the 
year with the object of preparing a special bulletin upon the same. This latter 
,was duly published. It discusses such important pests as horse flies, lice of 
various hosts, ticks, etc. Observations on live stock insects were also made 
at several of our entomological laboratories. 

Indun Orch.\rd Work 

The work of the Supervisor of Indian Orchards in British Columbia is under 
the direction of the Dominion Entomologist. This officer is employed by the 
Department of Indian Affairs. During 1923, the progress of this work has been 
ver}' gratifying. On some of the Indian reserves excellent orchard fruit has 
been raised, packed and graded, and sold for satisfactory prices. In some sec- 
tions hay and grain are the staple crops grown, while in others special attention 
is being given to dairying, small fruit culture, etc. Special instructions have 
been given to the Indians regarding the control of the commonly occurring 
insects of the orchard and farm and demonstrations in spraying have been 
undertaken. 

Advisory Bo.\rd ox Wild Life 

During 1923, the Dominion Entomologist as the representative of the 
Department of Agriculture on the Advisory Board on Wild Life Protection, 
attended the meetings of the board. The departments represented on this board 
are .\griculture, Indian .\ffairs. Mines, Interior. Fisheries and Mounted Police. 
On February 6, 7 and 8, 1924, the Dominion Entomologist acted as chairman 
at an important conference of provincial and federal officials interested in wild 
life protection which was held in Ottawa under the auspices of the Canadian 
National Parks Branch. 

I.nterdep.\rtmental Committee on Air Operation 

During the year, the Associate Dominion Entomologist was appointed as 
the representative of the Department of Agriculture on the above committee, 
the members of which act in an advisory- capacity in matters relating to the 
flying work required by the various government departments. Meetings of the 
board have been attended during the year by this officer. 



90 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

ExHTBiTiox Work 

During the year the Entomological Branch prepared special exhibits of 
insects and their work which were shown at the larger exhibition centres, such 
as Toronto, Ottawa and London. At the smaller exhibitions held in several 
of the provinces attractive exhibits were also made. At each of these exhibi- 
tions an officer of the Branch was present to give information of value regarding 
the control of insects, etc. These exhibits attracted a great deal of interest and 
undoubtedly assisted to an important degree in bringing the work of the Branch 
to the attention of the public generally. 

LlBH.UlY 

During the year a number of important works on economic and taxonomic 
entomology have been added to tlie library of the Entomological Branch and 
considerable progress made in cataloguing the books, pamphlets, etc. 

Field Laboratories 

Annapolis Royal, N.S. — Special efforts were directed by officers attached to 
this laboratory, to assist fruit growers and others in the control of destructive 
species of insects. The apple maggot which has been especially abundant in 
certain fruit centres was given particular attention as a result of which growers 
became familiar with the proper methods of control and thereby saved their 
crops. The strawberry weevil was also specially investigated and information 
relating to control disseminated among the growers. Important progress was 
made at the laboratory during the year in developing cheaper and better 
insecticides for the control of insects. Much educational work was also con- 
ducted, addresses being given at farmers and fruit-growers' meetings, demon- 
strations given in the spraying and dusting of orchard trees, and the publication 
of timely information. 

Wolfville, N.S. — Investigations at this laboratory related particularly to the 
control of the European apple sucker by the Entomophthora fungus. Studies 
were also continued on the Empusa parasite of the green apple bug. Scouting 
work in connection with the spread of the apple sucker was directed mainly 
from this laboratory. The natural control of aphids attacking the apple was 
also investigated. Aphids were abundant in the neighbourhood and this afforded 
an opportunity for the obtaining of predators and parasites. 

Kentville, A'. S.— Studies in the control of wireworms affecting vegetables 
were conducted from this temporary field laboratory during 1923. Insect 
carriers of mosaic diseases to potatoes also received attention, together with the 
perfection of spraying and dusting machines and materials. Tiie life-histories 
and control of many insects affecting vegetables are also being studied. 

Frcdcricton, N.B. — Investigations relating to forest, fruit and other insects 
were conducted from this laboratory'. A large amount of timber in the condition 
of fire-killed trees, windfalls and logs, is ruined each year by wood-boring insects 
and our officers have commenced an extensive study of this problem with a 
view to perfecting methods of preventing this form of injury. Additional studies 
of the larch sawfly which is again becoming abundant and threatens to kill the 
young crop of larch, were undertaken. An investigation to determine the con- 
dition of forest trees most attractive to the different species of insects, involving 
monthly cutting of different species of trees was commenced in 1923, near Fred- 
ericton, in co-operation with the Provincial Forestry Branch and the University 
of New Brunswick staff. The information obtained should aid us in perfecting 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 91 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

our methods of control. An extensive outtinR operation was also conducted by 
our officers in co-operation with one of the lumber companies, to determine the 
value of recovering dying beetle infested balsams in preventing further similar 
injury to the area. On two areas representing different types of forest, detailed 
studies were made to determine the quantity of budworm-killed timber still 
valuable for lumber and pulp. 

Insects injurious to tlie orchard and farm were abundant in New Brunswick 
in 1923. Remedies for tent caterpillars, fruit worm, apple maggot, fall web- 
worm, codling moth, pear slug, flea beetles, aphids, plant bugs, cutworms, etc., 
were frequently requested. In many cases farms and orchards were visited by 
our officers and in some districts control demonstrations undertaken under com- 
mercial conditions. 

Hemmingjord, Que. — The officer in charge of this laboratory has devoted 
considerable attention to the life-history and control of the apple maggot, 
■which is one of the most important fruit insects occurring in Quebec province. 
A definite spray recommendation has been evolved for the control of this insect. 
Other studies in which excellent control measures have been developed, relate 
to the apple curculio, the plum curculio, the round-headed apple tree borer, 
the cigar and pistol case-bearers, etc. Considerable extension work was con- 
ducted among fruit growers, and timely articles published in local papers from 
time to time. In order to direct further attention to the work conducted from 
this laboratory, special exhibits were prepared for a number of the fall fairs, 
an officer being stationed with the exhibit to supply information desired. In 
addition to outbreaks of the insects mentioned above, other pests such as cut- 
worms, white grubs, tent caterpillars, fall webworm, etc., were abundant and 
required attention. 

Aylmer, Que. — As in previous years this field station has conducted investi- 
gations relating to important shade tree insects of Eastern Canada and to the 
biology of numerous species of injurious forest insects. Special studies in the 
control of destructive boring insects are being conducted. The relation of 
weather conditions to insect activities is receiving special attention. Monthly 
cuttings of different species of trees were made to determine the condition of 
the wood and bark most attractive to different boring insects. Forest insect 
material is sent to tliis laboratory from the forests of Quebec and Ontario 
for biological studies. 

Vineland Station, Ont. — In the Niagara district of Ontario work on the 
grape-leaf-hopper was continued. With the information our officers now have, the 
quelling of an outbreak of this insect in one season is easily within the bounds 
of possibility. Further important progress has also been made in the control 
of the rose chafer, which insect within recent years has been an important enemy 
of grapes, cherries, etc. In co-operation with the St. Catharines, Ont., laboratory 
of plant pathology, a joint investigation on raspberry mosaic was incepted. The 
entomological phase of this investigation includes studies on the transmission of 
the disease through the agency of aphids and the other insects, etc. An exten- 
sive study of the codling moth was incepted, and further progress made in 
studies of the pear psylla, peach plant bugs, blackberry leaf-miner, European 
red mite, etc. 

Strathroy, Ont. — This permanent laboratory serves as headquarters for all 
field work in the common field crop and vegetable insect studies of western 
Ontario, from which practical extension operations in the control of insect pests 
are developed. Furthermore, being situated in a mixed farming and dairying 
centre studies are being maintained on insects affecting forage crops and hay. 



92 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

particular attention being directed to clover insects, hessian fly, white grubs, and 
chinch bug. The ofBcer in charge of this laboratory has continued to assist in 
the inspection of imported nursery stock entering western Ontario. 

Port Stanley, Ont. — This temporary laboraton.- is maintained especially for 
use in the European corn borer studies which are being undertaken in Elgin 
county, Ont., which at the present time represents the centre of infestation. This 
laboratory, however, serves as a general headquarters for all biological studies 
on this insect throughout Ontario having been established first in 1921. 

St. Thomas, Ont. — This laboratory is devoted to the rearing of parasites of 
the European corn borer, and their colonization in areas in Ontario where infes- 
tations of the corn borer have been serious. The parasite studied and reared in 
1923, is the species known as Habrobracon brcvicornis. Breeding stock of this 
parasite, imported from Europe, was obtained from the United States Bureau 
of Entomology. As mentioned in another part of this report, 595,000 individuals 
of this parasite were reared at this laboratory and liberated in fields where the 
corn borer has been serious. Arrangements were also made to receive breeding 
stock of another important parasite of the corn borer in Europe, namely, 
Exoristes roborata. The Dominion Entomologist, while in western Ontario 
located a native parasite of the corn borer, also of the genus Habrobracon and 
material of this species has been under observation at the St. Thomas laboratorj'. 

Treesbank, Man. — The decline of the grasshopper outbreaks in Manitoba, 
which have occurred in recent years, has permitted the extending of more time 
to the less spectacular but probably more important insect pest, the wheat-stem 
sawfly. This insect has spread to a very great extent across the Prairies of late 
years and it is receiving attention at this laboratory which is situated in the 
most severely infested area. Studies in insects affecting sunflowers, sweet clover, 
alfalfa and such crops which are of importance in mixed farming centres are 
also being undertaken. As time permits, observations are being continued on 
insects affecting live stock, and also on insects affecting shade trees. 

Indian Head, Sask. — The shade trees in the prairie provinces have suffered 
severely from insect injuries during recent years. Large numbers of them are 
being planted each year on the prairie farms and we are making a special effort 
to aid in protecting them from insect injuries. A laboratory has been established 
at Indian Head to conduct needed investigations on the control of shade tree 
insects and to recommend effective methods for prevention and control of 
injuries. An extensive outbreak of forest tent caterpillars was the most impor- 
tant subject investigated and a circular on the subject has been written and dis- 
tributed in the infested areas. More than thirty other species of important shade 
tree insects demanded more or less attention. The work of this laboratorj' is 
conducted in close co-operation witii the Tree Planting Division of the Forestry 
Branch, Department of the Interior. 

Saskatoon, Sask. — An effort is being made at this laboratory, using the 
excellent facilities offered through the association with the University of 
Saskatchewan, to study the soil faunal content in a series of fields under certain 
crop rotation practices. An analysis of the typical habitats of such soil-infesting 
insects as cutworms and wireworms, is also being made and it is hoped the 
results will indicate the most suitable crop rotations from a soil faunal point of 
view. In addition, life-history and control studies are being continued with 
many grain insects, such as chinch bugs, wheat stem sawflies, wireworms, and 
cutworms. 

Lethbridge, Alta. — The most important insect studies being undertaken at 
this laboratory relate to grasshoppers and to the pale western cutworm. Both 
these insects have of recent years caused a great deal of damage and special 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 93 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

efforts have been made to study their parasites and other natural control factors 
so that some evidence of their future occurrences as pests may be obtained. The 
growth in the development of alfalfa and clover hay and seed growing in southern 
Alberta has necessitated instituting studies on insects affecting these crops. 
Special investigations were made on the seed chalcid and thrips. The vegetable 
growing interests of Alberta required the incepting of certain studies notably 
against the onion and cabbage maggots. 

Banff, .4/6cr<a.— Investigations at this laboratory have related particularly 
to the various species of mosquitoes present in the Rocky Mountains National 
Park. Excellent control of these objectionable insects has been demonstrated 
and undoubtedly this has added very considerably the tourist traffic to this 
wonderful mountain park. In this work our officers have had the close co-oper- 
ation of the Dominion Parks Branch of the Department of the Interior. 

Vernon, B.C. — Investigations relating to many forest insects were conducted 
from this laboraton.- and special efforts were made to control the destructive pine 
bark beetle outbreaks of the yellow pine areas. Investigations were conducted to 
determine the relation of neglected slash to the development of bark beetle 
outbreaks. The results indicate that slash burning must continue to form an 
essential part of our bark beetle control work. As in previous years, our officers 
planned and supervised the extensive bark beetle control operations conducted 
by the Provincial Forest Branch. Forest insect surveys made by our officers in 
different parts of the Interior of the Province determined the areas where con- 
trol work was required and plans were devised for the conducting of the control 
operating. Bark beetle investigations and the control operations include, 
particularly, injuries to yellow pine, lodgcpole pine, western white pine and 
Douglas fir. Studies in many other important forest insects were conducted 
with particular reference to the biologv' of the injurious species. 

At this laboratory, too, other officers were detailed for special investigations 
of insects attacking fruits and vegetables. The fruit-tree leaf-roller, an insect 
which is developing into a serious pest in the Okanagan Valley, was given special 
attention, and in co-operation with the provincial Horticultural Department, oil 
sprays have been tested, as a result of which definite recommendations have 
been made to the fruit growers. Other foliage-eating caterpillars have also 
been studied, as well as species of thrips, mites, etc. 

Victoria, B.C. — The work carried on from this laboratory consisted of a 
continuation of tests of strawberry root weevil barriers, control of holly infest- 
ing insects, control of leaf rollers, collection and rearing of bud moth material 
and parasites, and experiments with insect carriers of mosaic disease in pota- 
toes. In all of this work important progress was made. The strawberry root 
weevil investigations have demonstrated to commercial pxjwers the value of 
the barrier method of control. 

Agassiz, B.C. — Studies of flea beetles, root maggots, etc., as well as insects 
attacking bush fruits, have occupied the attention of the officer in charge of 
this laboraton,-. Further data has also been secured on the satin moth, an 
European insect introduced into the pro\ince of British Columbia and one 
which is spreading gradually. Systematic and other studies of the various 
species of aphids of the pro\'ince have also been undertaken. Assistance in 
the inspection and fumigation of imported nurser>' stock has also been given 
from this laboratorj*. 

Nicola, B.C. — During 1923, a temporary field laboratory at this point 
devoted attention to the control of grasshoppers as they affect the range and 
stock conditions of the " dry interior " regions of the province. Ecological 
and life-historj- studies on many insects of the range were also conducted. 



94 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Publications 

The following publications have been issued from the Entomological 
Branch during the year: — 

BULLETINS 

No. 22. — Biological Notes on Parasites of the Prairie Cutworms. By E. H. 

Strickland. 
No. 23. — North American Cerambycid Larvae. By F. C. Craighead. 
No. 24. — Insects Affecting Live Stock. By S. Hadwen. 

CIRCXILABS 

No. 10. — The Fruit-tree Leaf-roller ami its Control in British Columbia. By 

E. P. Venables. 
No. 12. — How to Foretell Outbreaks of the Pale Western Cutworm in the 

Prairie Provinces. (Re'V'ised.) By H. L. Seamans. 
No. 14.— The Beet Webworm. By E. H. Strikland and N. Criddle. 
No. 19. — The Control of Forest Tent Caterpillars in the Prairie Pro\^nces. 

By J. J. deGrysa 
No. 21.— The Walnut Caterpillar and its Control. By C. B. Hutchings. 
No. 22. — Two Insects Affecting Cane Fruits in British Columbia. By W. 

Downes and R. Glendenning. 

PAMPHLETS 

No. 6. — The Western Wheat-stem Sawfly and its Control. (Revised.) By N. 

Criddle. 
No. 14. — Directions for Collecting and Preserving Insects. (Revised.) By 

J. H. McDunnough. 
No. 31.— Aphids or Plant Lice. (Revised.) By W. A. Ross. 
No. 32. — Root IMaggots and their Control. By R. C. Treheme. 
No. 33.— Wireworm Control. By R. C. Trcherne. 

In addition to the above department publications the officers of the Branch 
have contributed articles in the Agricultural Gazette of Canada, as well as in 
the entomological journals such as The Canadian Entomologist, transactions 
of various societies, etc. Many articles were also prepared by our entomologists 
for the agricultural and horticultural press. 



THE FRUIT BRANCH 

Inspection Service 

The inspection staff in 1923-24 was sc\-enty-fivc as compared with sc\'enty- 
one in 1922-23, tiie slight increase being in temporary men to assist in addi- 
tional work caused by the enforcement of the Root ^'egctabIes Act, 1922. The 
staff is employed primarily for inspectional work under the Fruit Act and 
the Root Vegetahk's Act, but in addition give practical demonstrations in 
approved methods of picking, packing, grading and loading for the various 
domestic and foreign markets. They also endeavour to meet the increasing 
demand for special inspections of fruits and vegetables at point of shipment 
and in the distributing centres — producers, the trade and public carriers find- 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 95 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

ing it of very considerable value to be able to secure the services of the 
inspectors and the benefits derived from handling certified shipments. The 
inspector's impartial report is practically always accepted by shipper and con- 
signee, and in most cases forms a satisfactory basis for settlement in connection 
with disputed lots. 

In co-0f)eration wnth the various Provincial Departments of Agriculture 
meetings were arranged during the winter months when our inspectors were 
able to assist at packing demonstrations and by giving information with respect 
to packing, grading and marketing. In many cases the inspectors acted ^ 
judges at exhibitions. 

The increased demand for boxed apples in the markets of Eastern Canada 
and the United Kingdom has stimulated interest in box packing and our fruit 
packing and orchard specialist, together with those inspectors competent to give 
instniction in box packing, has done excellent work in giving practical instruc- 
tion both to individual growers and at packing school^. 

During the season of 1922 it was found that the tender fruit markets, 
particularly in Eastern Canada, were being glutted with fruit which arrived in 
poor condition, caused largely by improper packing and handling at point of 
shipment. This fruit was being marketed in competition with imported fruits 
packed under the best modern methods, and consequently sold at greatly reduced 
prices. It was, therefore, decided to engage the services of an expert in western 
methods of fruit packing to work in conjunction with the permanent packing and 
orchard specialist. Both experts devoted their whole time during the shipping 
season to demonstration work in the tender fruit districts of Ontario, and as a 
result marketing conditions and prices showed a material improvement. This 
work was later extended to include special instruction in apple box and crate 
making, box packing and warehouse management. 

The assistance rendered the blueberry shippers and dealers in Quebec was 
continued last season, when two officers were stationed in the Lake St. John 
district during the rush movement. 

The inspectors in the districts affected, again co-operated with the Entomo- 
logical Branch by being on the watch for violations of the European corn borer 
quarantine. 

The inspection of cooperage stock and barrel factories was vigourously 
prosecuted in order to ensure a supply of standard sized barrels for both apples 
and potatoes. Convictions were secured against three manufacturers of under- 
sized barrels, a conviction also being secured in connection with the manufacture 
and use of undersized apple crates. Basket factories and fruit containers 
generally were systematically inspected, some 375 inspections being reported. 

The Fruit Act 

This legislation, which is a consolidation of Part IX of the Inspection and 
Sale Act and amendments made in accordance with resolutions passed at the 
Dominion Fruit Conference of 1922, became effective June 13, 1923. It provides 
new grade designations and definitions for apples, crabapples and pears when 
packed in bo.xes, .some sligiit changes in the definitions covering barrelled apples 
and the standardizing of additional packages. Throughout the past year 
educational work has been carried on by personal explanation, at public meetings 
and through press publicity to familiarize the trade with the new regulations, 
particularly in respect to the box packs. 

The number of violations reported under the Fruit Act during the past year 
was 953, as compared with 1.280 in 1922-23. All violations were carefully 
investigated, and in nineteen cases prosecution followed. 



96 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

The following table shows the number of lots of various kinds of fruits 
inspected and the number of packages inspected during the year ending March 
31, 1924:— 



Variety 


Number 

of lots 

inspected 


Number 

packages 

in lot 


Number 
packages 
inspected 




Barrels 


11.820 

5,036 

303 

593 

1,136 

877 

592 

3.428 

232 

72 


1,550,473 
1,817.246 
33.564 
116.324 
252.775 
228.391 
94.660 
4.59.908 
285.091 
72 


66.473 


Apples 

Apples 

Pears 


Boxes 

Bftsketa 

Packages 


72.695 
3.280 
7.770 

14.034 




10.593 


Tomatoes ]| 


5.375 
58,162 


Grapes 


Baskets 


9,420 










21,089 


4.838.504 


247,802 







The Root Veget.\bles Act 

Substantial progress has been m.ade in the enforcement of the Root Vege- 
tables Act, which has now been in effect for nearly two years. While there are 
minor points which require adjustment and possibly amendment, the past 
season's operations have confirmed the opinion of producers, shippers and dealers 
that the Act is progressive legislation and its enforcement of value in stabilizing 
the industry. 

With the exception of four temporary men appointed specially for work in 
the commercial potato districts, the enforcement of the Root Vegetables Act 
has been carried on by the fruit inspection staff, necessitating vcr>' little 
additional expenditure in enforcing the potato and onion grading regulations. 
Further educational work is still required to familiarize producers with these 
regulations, particularly in some of the large potato districts where fruit is not 
commercially grown and where our staff of inspectors is consequently small. The 
number of violations recorded under the Root Vegetables Act during the fiscal 
year 1923-24 was 1,315, with prosecutions following in ten cases, three of these 
being in connection with the manufacture of potato barrels of less than standard 
size. 

The following statement shows the number of lots of potatoes and onions 
inspected and the number of packages inspected during the vear ended March 
31, 1924:— 



Total 

of 

Inspections 



Number 

of packages 

in lot 



Number 
of packages 
inspected 



Potatoes (90 lb. bags).. . . 
Potatoes (180 lb. bags)... 

Potatoes (barrels) 

Potatoes I bulk) 

Miscellaneous vegetables. 
Onions (bags) 



3,170 
65 
110 
1,609 
58 
585 



714.439 
14.090 
22.783 



36.995 
2.318 
1,958 



Totals. 



5,597 



873,697 



Fruit Season, 1923 

A season approximately two weeks later than normal in all the fruit-growing 
provinces with the exception of British Columbia followed a winter during which 
but little, if any, injury was done to the fruit plants, bushes and trees. The 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 



97 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

blossom was heavy and there was every indication of a crop of most fruits sliglith 
in excess of tlie abundant crop of 1922. Slight frosts and less favourable con- 
ditions later in the season however, reduced the crop prospects so that a( 
harvesting time the total yield of practically all kinds of fruits was less than the 
year previous. 

The total apple crop of the Dominion was 4,399,969 barrels, slightly le«s 
than that of 1922. when 5,048,40o Ivirrels were produced and of 1920 when tlic 
crop totalled 5,828,632 barrels. The following table shows the comparison 
between the crop of other fruits for 1922 and that of 1923. — 



Pears 

Plums and prunes 

Peaches 

Apricots 

Cherries 

Strawberries 

Raspberries 

Other berries 

Grapes 



461,227 bush. 


227,335 bush 


408,438 " 


348,482 " 


577, .561 " 


403,600 " 


37,766 " 


32,8.50 " 


202.740 " 


203,125 " 


8,678,200 qts. 


8.6.52,200 qts. 


6.271,72.5 " 


4,496,840 " 


2.837. .549 " 


2.527,700 " 


•0,308,462 lbs. 


42,18.5,077 lbs. 



It is estimated that the commercial crop of all fruits in 1923 had a whole- 
sale value of $33,169,143. 

Growing conditions in British Columbia were particularly favourable. All 
fruits bloomed freely and gave indication of a very satisfactory crop. In the 
Okanagan Valley the season was two weeks in advance of that of 1922. Early 
estimates of a crop of apples in excess of that of 1922 were fulfilled, final crop 
estimates being 3,700,000 bo.xcs as compared with 3,082,000 boxes the previous 
year and 1,819,995 boxes in 1920. Summer apples were lighter, fall apples 
about equal, but winter apples considerably heavier, particularly such varieties 
as the Wagener, Rome Beauty, Spy, and .Jonathan. The crop of pears, peaches, 
cherries, strawberries and raspberries was in excess of 1922, but the crop of 
plums, prunes and apricots, showed a slight decrease. 

Although the season in Ontario was somewhat backward, early conditions 
were very favourable and there was a record showing a bloom on apples and 
a good showing on other fruits. The weather conditions however, during 
blossoming time were not favourable for a good set and resulted in the total 
apple crop being but 1,304,400 barrels as compared with 1,739,000 barrels the 
year previous and the 1920 crop of 3,257,483 barrels. Baldwins, Spies and 
Starks, however, were a hea\-y crop. The crop of other fruits such as peaches, 
pears, plums, cherries and berries showed a considerable drop from that of 1922. 

The fruit trees in the Pro\-ince of Quebec came tlu-ough the winter in a 
very healthy condition, but although the bloom was heavy, the set was ver>- 
light so that early indications did not promise a total crop of apples greater 
ilian 50 per cent of that of the year previous. Even these early indications 
were not maintained, as unfortunately during early July a ver\' severe hail 
storm visited the St. Hilaire and Rougemont districts and caused material 
damage to the crop. In some districts, and especially where certain varieties 
were not hea\-y in 1922, the total crop was header, but throughout the province 
the final vield was but 65.094 barrels as compared with 216.984 barrels in 1922 
and 334,045 barrels in 1920. 

In New Brunswick the season w.as considerably later than usual. The 

apple trees did not come into full blossom until the week of .June 8th. Duchess, 

Dudley, Ben Davis, Russets, Wealthy and Mcintosh showed a full bloom and 

set for a full crop. Tent Caterpillars caused considerable damage but on the 

16—7 



98 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

whole the fruit was of good size and particularly clean. Wliile the apple crop 
of 1920 totalled 130,876 barrels and in 1922 totalled 173,236 barrels that of 
1923 packed only 69,292 baiTcls. The strawberry crop was estimated at 500,- 
000 cjuarts as comparetl with 672.000 quarts ilic year prcWous and raspberries 
at 16.995 quarts as compared with 28.324 quarts "in 1922. 

All fruit trees and plants in Xova Scotia wintered well there being prac- 
tically no indication of winter injury either from the cold or severe storms. In 
a few instiinces ilie limbs of trees wore broken due to the weight carried while 
the snow was melting. The total damage from this cause however, was not seri- 
ous. The season was approximately 10 days later than average, but the 
apple blossom was unusually abundant with practically all trees showing full. 
From early indications the crop was estimated at 10 per cent heavier tiian that 
of 1923, with Ben Davis, Golden Russets, Kings, Greenings, Spies and Blen- 
heims, particularly hea\^\ The quality of the fruit was good, but the colour 
was not up to normal. Hca^y wind storms in August followed by a severe 
storm early in October caused a verj' severe loss, so that the total crop when 
harvested was practically the same as that of the year prc\-ious of 1,821,064 
barrels, as compared with 1,891,852 barrels in 1922 and 1,440,812 barrels in 
1920. 

The crop of strawberries, 135,000 quarts and of raspberries 36,000 quarts 
was slightly in excess of that of 1922. 

In spite of unusually hea\y snow storms on Prince Edward Island the 
fruit trees suffered little damage and all trees and plants came through the 
winter in good condition. Of the small quantity of fruit produced in this 
province, apples, cherries and strawbeirie-s comprise the larger portion. Accord- 
ing to the census of 1921, the crop of 1920 totalled approximately 50,000 
barrels of apples, 2,400 bushels of cherries and 91,600 (luarts of strawberries. 

Export M.\rkets 

The Canadian Fruit Trade Commissioner in England rendered many 
exhaustive and very favourable reports covering the fruit market conditions 
in the principle markets in Great Britain and on the Continent. He also acted 
as the Canadian Representative on the Imperial Fruit Show Committee. 

The export apple season of 1923 opened ver>' satisfactorily; prices during 
September and October maintaining a level, that in view of general conditions 
of industrial depression, the considerable amount of unemployment, the result- 
ing reduced purchasing power of a large proportion of the consuming public, 
and the fact that twice as many barrelled apples and three times as many 
boxed apples went forward during the period as compared with last year, was 
really remarkable. The important factor however, in the situation was the 
shortage of continental crops and the fact that England had possibly no more 
than one-third of a one hundred per cent crop. 

During the month of November the quantity of apples exf)orted was just 
about double that of the previous year and the reaction of the market to such 
heavT,' ovei-seas supplies was naturally disastrous, prices dropped from 2s. to 
3s. on both boxes and barrels, as compared with mid October values and 5s. 
to 8s. per barrel as compared with those of late September and early October. 
The barrel apple prices would not average higher than 20s. to 22s. for No. 1 
and 12s. to 16s. for No. 3, while boxed apples fell below profit returning figures, 
Jonathans. Extra Fancy, only ver>- occasionally making as high as 10s. and 
usually only from 8/6 to 9/6. 

The low prices prevailing on all markets discouraged shipments during 
December. Boxed apples particularly showed a considerable reduction. Bar- 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 99 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

relied apples nevertheless continued to be considerably in excss of those for 
the same period last year. The reduced quantities, together with the stimulat- 
ing effect of Christmas trade activities reacted favourably on prices which 
showed a slight increase in barrelled apple values of from Is. to 6s. in the 
maximum and from 3s. to 4s. in the minimum. There was also an improve- 
ment in prices paid for British Columbia l^oxcs from Is. to 2s. 

During January tbe arrivals were comparatively moderate, especially as 
regards boxes, which were somewhat less than during the same month of 1923, 
while barrels, although not overloading the market, greatly exceeded the 
quantities ofTerod during the same period last year. The prices of all apples 
advanced over those of December from 2s. to 4s. for all grades. During Febru- 
ar>% the arrivals were hea\y for the season, barrelled apples showing a con- 
siderable increase over those on the market during February last year, and 
boxed apples being nearly double the shipments in 1922. 

The total shipments to April 30 of Canadian apples of the 1923 crop was 
1,326.656 barrels and 568,545 boxes, as compared with 1,169,685 barrels and 
340,685 boxes of the 1922 crop. 

Fruit .\nd Vegetable Crop Reports 

The Fruit and Vegetable Crop Reports were issued each month from June 
to October, inclusive, and a special potato crop report in November. Each 
report contained a summary of the crop prospects throughout the Dominion 
and a detailed report on the prospects in each of the producing sections of the 
Dominion, the United States and Europe. In addition there were notes on 
transportation matters and on fruit and vegetable insects, the latter being pre- 
pared by the Entomological Branch of the department. A large number of 
requests were received for this report and the mailing list was consequently 
increased during the year by over 800 names bringing the total list to slightly 
over 10,000. 

Telegr.\phic M.arket Reports 

During the year seventy-one Telegraphic Market Reports were issued from 
Ottawa, once every week except during the heavy fruit marketing season 
when they were issued twice weekly and simultaneously from Vancouver, 
Winnipeg and Ottawa. These reports contain quotations on all fruits and vege- 
tables submitted to the Fruit Branch by telegraph from all the principal 
marketing centres throughout the Dominion. In the exporting season they also 
contain quotations on fruits forwarded by cable from the more important 
export markets. The mailing list for this report now contains approximately 
4,500 names. 

Exhibitions 

With a view to encouraging the greater use of Canadian fruits and vege- 
tables, a booth was placed at the following exhibitions: Brandon, Calgary, 
Edmonton, Saskatoon, Regina, Canadian National Toronto, Central Canada 
Ottawa, Royal Agricultural Show Toronto, and T. Eaton Company, Winnipeg. 

An experienced demonstrator in household science gave daily demonstra- 
tions in the booth of various approved methods of canning and preparing 
fruits and vegetables. 

Booklets in which were printed a large number of recipes covering practical 
and simple methods of canning, preserving and storing fruits and vegetables 
were distributed to housewives. 

According to reports received from the fruit and vegetable trade in the 
districts concerned, a very considerable amount of encouragement was given to 
the industries in this manner. 
16—8 



100 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

For the Imperial Fruit Show held in Manchester, England, from October 25 
to November 5, 1923, the Fruit Branch collected and prepared an exhibit of 
the better varieties of export apples. This exhibit which was one of the major 
attractions at the Show proved to be of very material value in the advertising 
of Canadian grown fruit. The whole exhibit was in charge of a representative 
from the Fruit Branch, who also acted as the Canadian representative on a 
board of three judges for the British Empire section. The Canadian exhibits 
in the competitive sections, while not as numerous as in previous years, due 
to the early date of the exhibition and the unfavourable condition of the fruit 
growing season, were of very superior quality and attracted a considerable 
amount of attention and favourable comment from the public, the fruit growers 
and tiie fruit trade in Great Britain. It is worthy of note that in addition to 
the awards to the Canadian entries of one gold cup, two silver cups, fourteen 
gold medals and two silver medals, the premier prize of the show was awarded 
to an exhibit of Mcintosh Red from British Columbia. This is the first time 
on record that a variety of apple other than the Cox Orange has been awarded 
the premier prize in the dessert class at a fruit show in Great Britain. 

British Empire Exhibitiox 

The Branch co-operated with the Canadian Exhibition Commissioner of 
the Department of Immgration and Colonization in securing apples for the 
British Empire Exhibition. In addition to locating orchards where fruit of 
exhibition quality was to be found, our expert packers assisted by the local 
inspectors selected, packed and shipped the apples secured in Ontario, Quebec 
and the Maritime Provinces, amounting in all to about 1,000 boxes. 

Jonathan Bre.\kdown 

Assistance was given the Experimental Farms Branch in British Columbia 
in connection with the special inquiry into the Jonathan rot. From September 
15 to October 31 practically the whole time of one inspector was devoted to 
picking and packing Jonathans at Summcrland, Kelowna, Okanagan Centre, 
Vernon and Salmon Arm twice weekly for the purpose of determining the effect 
of the maturity at time of packing on the development of the rot in storage. 

The C.\nadun Horticultvr.\l Council 

The Canadian Horticultural Council, organized at the Dominion Fruit 
Conference, 1922, at the request of the horticultural and allied industries, con- 
tinued to function in a manner most satisfactory to all the interests represented- 
A number of meetings, attended by representatives from the fruit and vegetable 
industries throughout the Dominion, were held, and questions and problems 
of vital importance to these industries discussed and adjusted. A large number 
of new varieties of horticultural trees, shrubs and plants from all sections of 
the Dominion were recorded and are now being tested with a view to registra- 
tion. Complete information as to the work of the council may be obtained 
from their Annual Report published in 1923. 

Tr.\nsportation 

Our supervisorj' and educational work in fruit transportation has proven 
increasingly important during the past year. Active measures by the railways 
towards reducing loss and damage claims have resulted encouragingly. The 
greatest success in claims prevention work has been in losses, while the damage 
proportion of the whole has correspondingly increased particularly in car- 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 101 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

loads. Tlie claims problem is slowly resolving itself into one of carload damage, 
and the Transportation Divnsion is co-operating with shippers and carriers 
towards correction of all loading and handling methods that can be considered 
responsible for depreciation or damage of these perishables in transit. A 
typical figure of success of claims prevention work is the ratio of claims paid 
to gross revenues on the Canadian National Railways in the past three years — 
1.4 per cent in 1921, .8 per cent in 1922 and .7 per cent in 1923. Shippers 
have freely admitted that llie service rendered by the railway and express 
carriers in 1923 has been the most satisfactory on record, and we are hopeful 
that this same relative efficiency increase will prevail as both shippers and 
carriers continue their efforts to overcome damages and depreciation in transit. 
Improved metliods of transportation are steadily extending the radius of dis- 
tribution. 

The refrigerated carload movement of tender fruits is recognized as the 
essential factor in the wide distribution necessary. The most modem refrig- 
erator cars offer dependable transp<5rtation if correctly loaded and braced and 
kept fully iced en route. The onus does not rest solely on either the shipper 
or the carrier. Our instructional work is being continued towards still more 
general understanding among shippers of the principles involved, while experi- 
ments are continuing co-operatively with the carriers towards perfection of 
equipment and icing arrangements. 

Shippers have asked that we include in experimental work of the coming 
season tests of ventilated instead of refrigerated carload movement of cherries. 
Humidity comparisons will be included in this test. Humidity comparisons 
will be made also in different types of refrigerator cars. 

The new berr>' box legalized by the Fruit Act, 1923, was tested last season 
and found to be an efficient carrier as well as an acceptable marketing package. 

In the 1922-23 winter movement of Nova Scotia apples to Great Britain 
considerable frosting resulted, and at the suggestion of Annapolis Valley shipH 
pers a meeting was arranged last July between railway and steamship officials 
and the growers, when preventive measures were decided on for every step 
in transportation. A gratifying result is that the past winter's movement was 
carried out with practically no frost damage. 

Experimental tests are now under way on a ventilating installation for 
the non-refrigerator equipment in express fruit service from producing dis- 
tricts, which it is expected will help to overcome the high temperatures which 
have prevailed in field-warm loadings. 

A new- fruit shed opened in Bonaventure terminal, Montreal, last August 
greatly improved the handling and marketing facilities for daily arrivals. 
Handling at the Point St. Charles terminal had been a source of constant pro- 
test, being too remote from tiie wholesale section of the city. 

Strawberry growers in the vicinity of Sackville. N.B., are being assisted 
in improving their carlnading metliods. This district has the greatest com- 
mercial production of strawberries in the Maritime l*rovinces and profitable 
markets are available in the cities and summer resorts of Eastern Canada and 
the New England States. In recognition of the development of this traffic into 
carload movement, additional carload express rates and reduced minimum have 
been negotiated for the coming season. 

On the boats collecting fruit and vegetable shipments from Okanagan 
Lake ports improvements are promised before this season opens for protection 
from boiler heat and to provide fanned fresh air through the cargo. 

Experiments were conducted during tlie past winter in unheated refrig- 
erator movement of apples from British Columbia to prairie markets and to 
Eastern Canada. Additional to the protection afforded by the insulated car 
16— 8i 



102 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

body tlie load was blankcttd with straw or hay. These experiments are 
directed towards avoidance of the over-maturity and quahty depreciation that 
has so frequently resulted in heated carloads of apples loaded from storage at 
practically full maturity, as well as towards lower transportation costs. A 
continuation of these loading tests will be carried out the coming winter. 

During the past winter the express companies of Canada have applied to 
the Board of Railway Commissioners for upward revision of express rates. 
Our Transportation Di-vision lias assisted the organized shippers in the differ- 
ent districts of production to set before the board their actual position with 
the relation of transportation costs ib their marketing problem. It was con- 
sidered reasonable that the carriers should be asked to recognize the value of 
transportation rather than proportionate cost of servic«, in establishing tlieir 
rates on these commodities of such relatively low ton-value. 

An effort was made to have preferential freight rates introduced for tlie 
encouragement of wider and more general inter-district and interpro\'incial 
exchange of certified seed potatoes. We are hopeful that before another season 
the railways will co-operatively assist in tliis means towards improvement in 
quality and quantity of production. 

THE PUBLICATIONS BRANCH 

Metliod of Distribution. — The publications of the department are prepared 
and issued by the respective branches. The Publications Branch functions as 
the distributing agency. Notification of the issue of a publication is sent 
by the head of the originating branch to the Director of Publicity, together 
with any special instructions that may be necessary' as to distribution. 

The general practice is to distribute to applicants and to what is termed 
the " special general " list. This is a standing list which includes agricultural 
officials, public libraries, members of Parliament and pro\'incial legislatures, 
the press, institutions, and exchanges. The list contains 2,485 English and 535 
French names. 

To the policy of dist'ribution to applicants, an exception is made in two 
instances, namely, in tlie case of " Seasonable Hinta." issued three times a year 
by tlie Experimental Farms Branch, and the interim reports of the Experi- 
mental Farms and Stations. " Seasonable Hints " is sent to the general mailing 
list and supplementary lists, comprising 273,173 names. It is also sent in 
small bulk lots to banking institutions and elevator companies for distribu- 
tion to farmer patrons. 

The second exception is in connection with the interim reports of the 
branch Experimental Farms and Stations. These are distributed to the names 
on that section of the general mailing list which covers the proNnnce or the 
portion of the pro^•ince in whicli the Farm or Station is located. 

The publications of the department as issued are announced in two ways. 
First, along with each copy of "' Seasonable Hints " is enclosed a silpplementary 
list of new publications. By this means, all whose names appear on the general 
list are kept advised of new issues, and of the fact that copies are obtainable 
on request. Attention is also directed to the regular list of publications, which 
is issued annually. By this means upwards of 270,000 persons, mostly farmers, 
are kept informed as to the publications available. The second method of 
announcement is by means of notices and short articles sent to the press. These 
are prepared in such a way as to indicate the usefulness and value of the pub- 
lications and to stimulate demand for them. Many of the weekly papers 
throughout the countn.' avail themselves of this means of giving service to their 
rural subscribers. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 103 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

Distribution. — The following comparative statement shows the total distri- 
bution of publications by the branch in 1922-23 and 1923-24, respectively. 

1922-23 1923-24 

Reports 173.566 155,.521 

Bulletins 39.0«8 17,923 

"Seasonable Hinta" 774,910 921 , 2.55 

PamphleU and Circulars, etc 1 , 626, 899 1, 329, 960 

"The Agricultural Gaiettc" 49. 173 51,975 

2,663.616 2,476,6.34 

Included in the above statement under Pamphlets and Circulars are the 
following multigraphed or printed periodicals, the distribution of which is per- 
formed on behalf of the originating Branch, together with the maintenance of 
the address lists. 



Title 



Originating Branch 



Dairy Market Report 

Egg and Poultry Market Report 

Dairy News Letter 

Kntomological News Letter 

Fruit Crop Report 

Seed, Feed and Fertilizer Markets 

Library Accessions, Descriptive list of 



Weekly 

Weekly 

Monthly 

Monthly 

Monthly 

(May-Oct.) 
Bi-weekly 

(printed)... 
Bi-monthly... 



Dairy Branch 
Live Stock Branch 
Dairy Branch 
Entomological Branch 

Fruit Branch 

Seed Branch 

International Institute Branch 



The number of envelopes addressed for Seasonable Hints shows approxi- 
mately the distribution through the mails of that periodical by the Publications 
Branch. This is given in the following table, which includes March, 1923, for 
comparison with March, 1924, showing a gain in that period of 10,395 copies: — 



— 


English 


French 


Total 


March. 1923 


216.968 
217,490 
220.139 
221,563 


45,810 
49, 143 
50, 272 
51.610 


262,778 


July. 1923 


266,633 


November. 1923 


270,411 


March, 1924 


273, 173 







The following periodicals were multigraphed or mimeographed by the Publi- 
cations Branch but, with the exception of the Entomological News Letter, were 
distributed by the originating branch, namely: — 



Entomological News Letter 

Insect and Pest Review 

Progress Report 



Period 



Monthly 
Monthly 
Monthly 



Originating Branch 



Entomological Branch 
Entomological Branch 
Entomological Branch 



Duplicating. — In addition to the periodicals appearing in the above table, the 
duplicating work includes circulars, form letters, etc., as well as special articles 
for distribution to the press, comprising in all, 171,806 sheets, compared with 
172,304 sheets in 1922-23. 

The Agricultural Gazette of Canada. — This bi-monthly periodical, which i? 
compiled and edited by the Publications Branch, is sent to officials, teachers of 
agriculture, senators, members of parliament, Dominion and Provincial, agricul- 
tural representativee, secretaries and presidents of agricultural associations, the 
press, libraries, exchanges, consuls, and to 267 paid subscribers. The distribution 
list comprises 6,883 English and 1.518 French names. 

The publication of the Agricultural Gazette was discontinued at the con- 
clusion of the fiscal year. 



104 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Seed, Feed and fertilizer Markets Report. — The issuing of this bi-weekly- 
report in English and French was begun by the Seed Branch during the year, and 
its distribution to the free list and to paid subscribers was undertaken. 

Branch Lists. — The Branch lists, sixty in number, were maintained for 
various branches of the department, and total 39,460 English and 5,986 French 
names. During the year, the Entomological Branch lists were revised and six 
new ones added. The Poultry Division added three new lists, and the Dair>" 
Branch revised the list of cheese and butter factories. 

Additions and Revisions. — During the year 17,048 names were removed from 
the various mailing lists, principally through returned envelopes; 32,765 names 
were added, and 2,821 changes of address were made. 

The general mailing list is augmented by placing thereon the names of all 
new applicants for publications, as well as names secured at the leading exhibi- 
tions, and in other ways. 

Cards of application were sent during the year to all box holders on rural 
routes in the postal divisions of Charlottetown, Halifax, St. John, Quebec, Sher- 
brooke and Montreal. Out of 61,572 cards sent 6,596 or 11 per cent were 
returned. 

Machine Addressing. — The number of envelopes addressed from lists by 
automatic machinery was 2,190,843 compared with 1,567,582 in the year previous. 
The classified statement follows: — 

Machine addressed— Bulletins, etc 1,302,619 

" " Market Reports 688.3,'?1 

Press Notices, Circulars 39. 170 

Addressing for branches 58,758 

2,086,878 
Lists of addresses 139,019 

Total 2, 225, 897 

Hand Addressing. — All publications mailed in response to individual request 
are hand addressed by typewriter. The number of envelopes so addressed was 
123,347 compared with 126,670 in 1922-23. 

Press Articles. — The press articles distributed by the branch are issued with 
the object of giving publicity to the work of the department, and of stimulating 
demand for publications. They comprise items of news, notices of publications, 
and siiort articles conveying infonnation of interest and value to the farming 
community. They are prepared chiefly by the branch, and are despatched to 
various sections of the Canadian press — dailies, weeklies, and agi'icultural 
journals. The total number of press articles issued during the year was 481 
compared with 578 in 1922-23. 

Special Ptiblications. — Three illustrated booklets, intended for distribution 
at the British Empire Exhibition, were compiled by the branch during the year. 
These were " Canadian Dairying ", " Canadian Wlieat and Wheat Flour ", and 
" Canadian Live Stock and ]\Ieat Industries '', and tlic prcparaiton of a fourth, 
" Canadian Fruit, Vegetables and Honey " was begun. The first named was also 
made use of at the World's Dairy Congress and National Dairy Show held in 
the United States in the autumn of 1923. 

Change of Quarters.— The premises at 72 Queen street being required by 
another Department of the Service, new quarters were assigned to the Publi- 
cations Branch in the Transportation building, and were occupied early in 1924. 

Publications Issued. — A list is appended of the printed publications issued 
by the department during the year, showing the title, classification, the number 
issued, and the number received and distributed by the branch. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 



105 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 



rUBLICATIONS ISSUED BY DErARTMENT AND DISTRIBUTION MADE BY 
PUBLICATIONS BRANCH IN 1923-24 



Number 
received 
by Pub- 
lications 
Branch 



Number 
distributed 
by Pub- 
lications 
Branch 



Canadian Seed Growers' Association, Report, 1922-23. 
Minister of Agriculture, Report, 1923 



Dairy and Cold Stoiage Branch — 

Dairjing in New Zealand and .Australia, Bull. No. 34, N.S 
Milk. Cream and Dairv Bv-Products, Testing of by Means of 

the BabcockTest, Bull. No. 14, N.S... _. 

Cream for Buttermaking. Care of, Pamp. No. 37, N.S 

Ice. Simple Methods for the Storage of, Pamp. No. 2, N.S 

Milk, Why and How to Ui>e, Pamp. No. 36, N.S 

Cream. Causes of \'ariation in the Percentage of Fat, in Hand 

Scparntor, Cir. No. IS, N.S 

Vat and Churning Numbers on Cheese and Butter Boxe 

Cir. No. 20, N.S 

Dairy Industry Act and Regulations, A.O.R., No. 13 

Dairy Produce Act and Regulations, A.O.R., No. 6 



Entomoloijical Branch — 

Cutworms. Biological Notes, Parasites of the Prairie, Bull 

No. 26, N.S 

Inst^cts .Vffecting Live Stock, BjU. No. 29, N.S 

Aphidsor Plant Lice, Pamp. No. 31, N.S 

Root Maggot and their Control. Pamp. No. 32, N.S 

Sawfly, Western Wheat Stem, Pamp. No. 6, N.S 

Wireworm Control, Pamp. No. 33, N.S 

Beet Webworm, Cir. No. 14, N.S 

Cutworms, How to Foretell Outbreaks of the Pale Western 

Cir. No. 12, N.S 

Tent Caterpillars, Control of Forest in the Prairie Provinces. 

Cir. No. 19, N.S 

Destructive Insects and Pests Act and Reg., A.O.R., No. 8. . . 

Experimental Farms Branch — 

Agassiz, B.C., Experimental Farm, Interim Report, 1922 

Animal Husbandry Division, Interim Report, 1922 

Bee Division, Interim Report, 1922 

Botany Division, Interim Report, 1922 

Brandon Experimental Farm, Man., Interim Report, 1923 

Cap Rouge Experimental Station, Que., Interim Report, 1922. 

Cereal Division, Interim Report, 1922 

Chemistry Division, Interim Report, 1922 

Charlottctown, P.E.I. , Experimental Station, Interim Report, 
1922 

Director, Dominion Experimental Farm, Interim Report, 
1922 23 

Economic Fibre Division, Interim Report, 1921-22 

Field Husbandry. Division, Interim Report, 1922 

Forage Plants Division, Interim Report, 1922 

Fredcricton. N.B.. Experimental Station, Interim Report, 1922 

Horticultural Division, Interim Report, 1922 

Illustration Stations Division, Western Canada, Interim Re- 
port. 1922 

Illustration Stations Division, Eastern Canada, Interim Re- 
port. 1922 

Invermere, B.C., Experimental Station, Interim Report, 1922. 

Kapuakasing, Ont., Experimental Station, Interim Report, 1922 

Lacombe, Alta., Experimental Station, Interim Report, 1922.. 

Kentville. N.S., Experimental Station, Interim Report, 1922.. 

Lennoxville, (iue.. Experimental Station, Interim Report, 1922 

Lethbridge, .Mta., Experimental Station, Interim Report. 1922 

Morden, Man., Experimental Station. Interim Report. 1922.... 

Nappan, N.S., Experimental Farm, Interim Report, 1922 

■ Poultry Division, Interim Report. 1922 

Rosthem, Sask., Experimental Station, Interim Report, 1922 . 

Ste. .Anne de la Pocatiere, Que., Experimental Station, Interim 
Report, 1922 

Scott, Sask., Experimental Station, Interim Report, 1922 

Sidney, B.C., Experimental Station, Interim Report, 1922 



100 
5,000 



2,000 


l.SOO 


25,000 


25,000 


30,000 


2'.I.4(K) 


25,000 


15,400 


5,000 


4,500 


8,000 


200 


15,000 


14,8.50 


10,000 


3,500 


2,000 


1,650 


17,000 


14,000 


5.000 


4,.S00 


13.000 


9,000 


10,000 


9,950 


8,000 


0,650 


7,000 


6,000 


5,000 


4,950 


5,000 


3,500 


13,000 


10,400 


13,200 


10,200 


19,000 


17,500 


13,000 


8,000 


12,500 


8.000 


7,500 


6,200 


19,000 


18,000 


12,500 


10,000 


13,000 




9,100 


6,600 


20,000 


19,806 


6,000 


4,500 


26,000 


23,000 


11,500 


9,000 


9,500 


7,500 


22,000 


13,000 


16,000 


14,900 


21,000 


19,500 


11,000 


8,900 


10,000 


8,750 


19,000 


14,505 


9,000 


9,800 


21.000 


16.6.35 


17,000 


15,025 


10,000 


8,000 


11,500 


8,800 


21,000 


14,815 


11,000 


8,000 


7,000 


6,606 


12,500 


10,400 


5.000 


3,000 



20 
2,236 



27,881 

1,270 
5,. 545 
11,615 
11,200 

1,375 

56 

4,282 
1,503 



78 
2,930 
2,528 
6,080 
347 
6,350 
2,302 

270 

1,683 
8,395 



3,296 
9,373 
7,107 
2,582 
6,189 
5,200 
7,132 



6,107 

10,269 
3,909 
6,460 
7,096 
1,968 
6,274 

7.267 

5,662 
5,551 
3,005 
13,832 
3,830 
13,345 
14,244 
7,950 
3,081 
5,629 
4.110 

3.186 
10,095 
2,703 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



PUBLICATIONS ISSUED BY DEPARTMENT AND DISTRIBUTION MADE BY 
PUBLICATIONS BIl.\NCH IN 1923-24 



Number 
received 
by Pub- 
lications 
Branch 



Number 
distributed 
by Pub- 
lications 
Branch 



Experimental Farms Branch — Concluded 

Summcrland, B.C., Experimental Station, Interim Report, 

1922 

Sub-Stations — BcaverlodRe, Alta. — 

Fort Vermilion, Alta.; Grouard, Alta.; Fort Smith. 
N.W.T.; Fort Resolution. N.W.T.; Swede Creek. 

Yukon; .''almon .\rm. B.C., Interim Report, 1922 

Swift Current. Sask., Experimental Station, Interim Report. 

1922 

Tobacco Division, Interim Report, 1922 

Bees and How to Keep Them, Bull. No. 33, N.S 

Cranbcrr\' Industry* and its Possibilities in Canada, Bull. 

No. 19, N.S 

Farm Feeds, Bull. No. 24. N.S 

Hardv Roses, Bull. No. 17, N.S 

Medicinal Plants, Bull. No. 36, N.S 

Orchard Practice. .Modem, Bull. No. 18, N.S 

Pigeons. Bull. No. 15, N.S 

Poultrv Produce for Market, Preparing, Bull. No. 20, N.S 

Rabbits, Bull. No. 28, N.S 

Soils, Alkali, Their Nature and Reclammation, Bull. No. 21. 

N.S 

Soil Fertility, Bull. No. 23, N.S 

Soils, Western Prairie, Bull. No. 22, N.S 

Beef Cattle, How Should Canada Export? Pamp. No. 39, 

N.S 

Index to Seasonable Hints, Complete, Pamp. Misc 

Meilleur Cheese, Pamp. No. 27, N.S 

Seasonable Hints. Periodical 

Silage and Silo Construction for the Maritime Provinces. 

Pamp. No. 35, N.S 

Steer Feeding Experiments in P.E.I. , Pamp. No. 23, N.S 

Plums, Disease of and Their Control, Cir. No. 15, N.S 

Fruit Branch — 

Prescr\ation of Fruit and Vegetables, Canning, Storing and 

Drying, Pamp., Misc 

Apples, Size, Colour and Minimums for, Cir. No. 16, N.S 

Fruit and Vegetables Recipes. Cir. No. 17, N.S 

Fruit Act and Regulations, A.O.R., No. 7 

Health of Animals Branch — 

Veterinary Director General, Report. 1922 

Fox Itanching in Canada, Bull. No. 12, N.S 

Mange in Horses and Cattle, Bull. No. 31, N.S 

Goitre, How to Prevent in New Bom Calves, Lambs and 
Other Animals, Cir. No. 3, N.S 

Live Stock Branch — 

Canadian Record of Performance, Pure Bred Dairy Cattle. 
Report No. 15 

Canadian Record of Performance, Sec. "A", Pure Bred Poul- 
try, Report No. 4 

Commercial Live Stock Marketed in Canada, Origin anil 
Quality, Re|K)rt No. 3 

Poultr\- Produce, Co-Operation in Marketing, Bull. No. 25, 

N.S ;.. 

Bacon Hog and Hog Grading. Handbook on the, Pamp. No. 
40, N.S 

Live Stock Markets and Meat Trade, Situation, Annual Re- 
view of 1922, Pamp. No. 34, N.S 

Live Stock Shipper's Guide, Pamp. No. 38, N.S 

Eggs, Standardized Grades of, Leaf. No. 6 

E^s, GradinR and Marking of, Keg. Respecting, A.O.R., 1923 

Eggs, Commercial and Standard Grades of. Their Definition 
and Purpose in Culinary Practice, Poster, Misc 

Federal Assistance to Hog Breeding, Booklet 

Federal Assistance to Horse Breeding, Booklet 



7,500 
16,000 
35,000 

16,000 
3,900 

26,000 
5,000 

35,000 
4,000 

10,000 

35,000 

6,000 
7,000 
17,000 

2,500 

15,000 

5,000 

1,144,000 



7,000 
1,500 
8,000 



20,000 
20,000 
75,000 
43,000 



7,000 
13,000 
9,000 



13,750 

15,000 

5,000 

10,000 

70,000 

5.000 
65.000 
10.000 
50,000 

50,000 
15,000 
15.000 



6,500 
13,000 
20,040 

5,000 
1.500 

26,000 
3,500 

28,000 
3,000 
9.000 

29,000 

6,000 
7,000 
17,000 

1,500 

11,000 

2,500 

928,125 



14 



00 
1,200 
1,050 



1.700 

6,000 

500 

18,050 



3,150 
9,000 
3,500 



13,750 

50 

2,700 

9,000 

10,000 

2,000 

24 

5,000 

16,985 

2,250 



4,489 
2.516 
5,210 

1,302 
350 
15,155 
500 
11,323 
1,280 
2,474 
13,284 

2,500 
2,895 
2.020 

1,121 

2,497 

1,030 

917,175 

7,312 

1,1,54 

100 



1,700 
210 
110 

1,656 



3,082 

2,246 

240 



25 

2.545 

5,619 

200 

2,000 

15 

2,573 

10,547 

25 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

PUBLirATIONS ISSUED BY DEPARTMENT AND DISTRIBUTION MADE BY 
PUBLICATIONS BRANCH IN 1923-24 



Title 



Number 
received 
by Pub- 
rations 
Branch 



Number 
distributed 
by Pub- 
lications 
Branch 



Lite Slnck Branch — Concluded 

Bull Loaning Policy, Booklet 

Boys' Cattle Breeding Policy, Booklet 

Dehorn Your Commercial Cattle, Pamp. No. 15 

The Egg (^a.se Plan. Pamp. No. 8 

The Safe Handling of Commercial Live Stock, Leaflet 

Amended Egg Regulations, A.O.R 

Pu^ilicalinwi Branch — 

Agricultural Gazette of Canada, The, Periodical 

Canadian Dairying, Booklet, B. E. Exhibition 

Canadian Whiat and Wheat Klour, Bmiklet, B. E. Exhibition 

List of Publications. Pamp. No. 42. N.S 

Maple Sugar Industry in Canada, Bull. No. 30, N.S 

Seed Branch — 

Fertilizers Samples. 1922-23. Pamp. No. 41, N.S 

Seed. P'eed and Fertilizers, Pamp. Misc 

Feeding Stuffs .\ct ami Regulations, .\.0.R., No. 10 

Fertilizers Act and Regulations, A.O.R. No. 9 

Seed Act and Regulations, A.O.R. No. 11 



15,000 
3,000 
50.000 
10,000 
100,000 
60,000 



54.400 
59,. 500 
50,000 
30,000 
10,000 



5,500 
30.000 
9,500 
7,. 500 
24,200 



.54,400 
5,8.'i0 
250 
30.000 
10,000 



3,400 
30,000 
5.000 
3.000 
24,200 



51,975 

4,783 

17 

3,025 

645 



242 
29,076 
3,533 

315 
16,220 



THE INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF AGRICULTURE 



At the Convention of 1905 tlie number of Governments which adhered to 
the International In^^titute of Agriculture was forty; this year the number has 
risen to sixty-two. The following are the only independent States that have 
not as yet adhered to the Convention: In Europe, the Kingdom of Albania 
(800,000 inhabitants), the Republic of Andorra (5,231), the Principality of 
Monaco (19,121), the Principality of Lichtenstein (9,900); in America, the 
Republic of Bolivia (2,265,000), Honduras (554,000), Panama (350,000), San 
Domingo (700,000), Venezuela (2,750,000); in Africa, the Republic of Liberia 
(1,500,000); in Asia, the Sultanate of Oman (500,000), Afghanistan (6,000,000), 
the State of Bhutan (250,000); the Kingdom of Siam (6,500,000). That is to 
say, of the total population of the globe, estimated at 1,800,000,000 inhabitants, 
not many more than 27,000,000 belong to independent States not yet adhering to 
the International Institute of Agriculture. 

The management of the Institute is vested in the General Assembly and 
the Permanent Committee. The Assembly meets every two years at the seat of 
the Institute to consider the work and expenditure during the two previous years, 
and to determine the programme of work and vote credits for the two ensuing 
years. The next Assembly will be held in May next, when Canada is to be 
represented by Sir Thomas Elliott, Bart., K.C.B., the Delegate on the Permanent 
Committee for Great Britain, also the Acting Delegate on the Permanent Com- 
mittee for Canada and the other British Dominions. The Permanent Com- 
mittee comprising the permanent or resident delegates of the adhering countries 
who form the Directing Board, is entrusted with the function of seeing that 
the programme laid down by the General Assembly is carried out as com- 
pletely and efficiently as circumstances permit. Some of the reports prepared 
by members of the Permanent Committee during the year mark important 
departures in the policy and activities of the Institute. 



108 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1926 

The contributions of the adhering States are regulated according to the 
particular one of the five groups in which each adheres; those adhering in the 
first group having sixteen units of contribution to pay and five votes, and those 
adhering in the fifth group having only one unit of contribution to pay and a 
single vote. Fifteen countries adhere to the first group, among them Great 
Britain, who, at the present rate of exchange, contributes from $17,000 to 
$18,000. Canada, adhering in the second group, pays one-half this sum. At a 
rate of exchange slightly above the present rate, conceding a value of five cents 
to the Italian lira, the total contributions at present assessed against the adher- 
ing governments is only slightly in excess of the total sum which has been 
spent in each of the last two years, viz., $165,000. Of this amount the King of 
Italy contributes regularly 300,000 liras annually: $60,000 at the normal rate 
of exchange, or $15,000 at the present rate. The performance of the very many 
important services is rendered possible only because of the extreme economy 
practised by the Permanent Committee. During the war the reserve fund, 
which had grown to something over $400,000, had, a couple of years ago, almost 
completely disappeared. A reserve is once more beginning to accumulate, 
chiefly because of the payment of arrears by some of the central governments 
that had become impoverished during the war. 

Of the numerous objects with which the Institute deals it had until a 
couple of years ago dealt chiefly with the first, namely, " to collect, study and 
publish as promptly as possible statistical, technical, or economic information 
concerning farming, vegetable and animal products, the commerce in agricul- 
tural products, and the prices prevailing in the various markets." In the reports 
of the Permanent Committee for the General A-scmbly of 1924 the Institute 
is devoting more attention to another of its objects, namely, to " submit to the 
approval of the Governments, if there is occasion for it, measures for the pro- 
tection of the common interests of farmers and for improvement of their con- 
ditions after having utilized all the necessary sources of information, su:h as 
the wishes expressed by international or other congresses, or by congresses of 
science applied to agriculture, or agricultural academies, learned bodies, etc." 

The latter cause of the Convention of 1905 grants to the Institute exten- 
sive powers in dealing with agricultural problems of the most varied nature, as 
will appear from the further reference to them in this report. Its success in 
dealing mth the world's crop statistics during and immediately after the war, 
won important recognition from the Genoa Economic Conference of the Allied 
and Other Powers, when the Institute was formally entrusted with furnishing 
for the League of Nations all the economic information which the latter might 
require in connection with the world's agriculture. A protest launched by the 
General Assembly of the Institute in 1920 against the action of the Inter- 
national Bureau of the League in proposing in its programme an eight-hour 
day for agricultural labour, raised the question of the jurisdiction of the Insti- 
tute in matters of agricultural labour. The question was referred for adjudi- 
cation to The Hague tribunal of the League, with the result that a mixed Com- 
mittee of the League and of the Institute was recently formed to deal with 
such questions in the future. 

When the building of the Institute was in the course of this year extended, 
much additional space was rcser\'ed for the use of the Institute Libran*', now con- 
sisting of over 100,000 bound and unbound volumes, and for the periodical roo.n 
attached to it. There was a lack of funds to furnish the equipment needed for 
the new quarters. A. donation of 50,000 liras was generously placed at tiie 
disposal of the Institute for the purpose by D. Roffredo Caetani, Prince of 
Basoiano. This is in response to a suggestion recorded at one of the General 
Assemblies, that donations would be gratefully received. One of the first to 
respond was Mons. ae Vilmorin, of Paris, the famous scientist and agricultural 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 109 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

cxfK'riincntalist. In the spring of this year when the Italian Commission for 
tlie Encouragement of tiie Cultivation of Citrus Fruits dissolved its organization 
it had in its treasury from the Italian State the sum of 100,000 liras to dispose 
of. The Commission created a fund having for its object the distribution of 
premiums for research work and scientific studies in connection with the culti- 
vation of citrus fruits, and the administration of tliis fund was entrusted to the 
Institute. 

During the year the Permanent Committee tendered a reception to Their 
Majesties tiie King and Queen of Spain, accompanied by Their Majesties the 
King and Queen of Italy. Another distinguished visitor was the ex-Minister of 
Agriculture for Great Britain, Sir Arthur Griffiths-Boscawen. 

Recognizing the paramount importance in all countries of milk and milk 
products the Institute was particularly active during the year in preparing a 
scheme for an effective international information service which would include 
the production of and trade in milk in its various forms, as well as butter and 
cheese (hard and soft varieties). As a sound basis for the service it is hoped 
that in future censuses and annual statistics of tlie various governments care 
will be taken to classify separately the females which produce milk for human 
consumption as distinguished from those whose milk serves only for the rearing 
of calves. Tlie proportion of cows producing milk for human consumption to 
the whole number of milk-producing females varies widely, tlie proportion in 
France being only 70 per cent. A scheme had already been outlined in 1914 
and had been referred to by the General Assembly of 1922. The difhculties 
confronting the Institute in its present undertaking arise chiefly from the serious 
lack of statistics in the majority of countries and from the incomplete and non- 
comparable statistics in other countries. The Institute finds this problem in the 
same state of chaos in which it found the world's crop statistics when it set 
out in 1908 to urge the governments without a statistical service to organize one, 
and the governments with an inadequate service to re-organize it so as to permit 
of comparisons between uniformly classified products. Once more the diversity 
of language, of standards of quality, weights, measures and currencies has to be 
met and surmounted. The Institute's decision now to proceed energetically 
with the work was to some extent influenced by the following resolutions, the first 
being that of the International Agricultural Congress at Paris in May, and the 
other the International Live Stock Congress at The Hague in August, 1923. 
Paris Congress: " Considering the role which has been vested in the Institute 
and the achievements which it has already accomplished. Resolved that there be 
organized, in accord with the International Institute of Agriculture, a per- 
manent International Live Stock Bureau, having for its object to continue to 
study the questions presented at this Congress (questions of breeding, the 
keeping of herd books, the re-organization of methods of selection, notably in 
the line of milk producers, etc.) , and to work out their realization." The Con- 
gress, moreover, favours an understanding between the different States to fix a 
common unit of mcasui'e of the alimentary value of different feeds and to arrive 
at a unification of metiiods in rationing. The Hague Congress: " The Con- 
gress, appreciating the work which has already been accomplished by the Inter- 
national Institute of Agriculture, and considering the practical results obtained 
in the line of statistics on the trade in animal products, milk control, and the 
breeding of domestic animals, requests the Institute to continue to extend its 
work along these lines." 

The Institute's present report refers to direct enxmieration of quantities of 
milk by applying to individual farmers as being so expensive that it is resorted 
to collect them only at decennial censuses and by a small number of govern- 
ments. At the inception of the proposed service the Institute will rely more on 
securing the total production of a countrj' on the basis of the number of milk 



110 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

producing animals and on an average annual per capita production; or again on 
the basis of a knowledge of the data relating to a part only of the production, 
such for instance as the quantities of milk delivered to co-operative dairies and 
made into butter, cheese and other milk products. Statistics based on such 
criteria, although at first lacking absolute reliability, will be of value, and can 
at once be supplied annually by a large number of important countries. To 
begin with, the service will be furnished annually, but will be more frequent as 
soon as governments, through improving their statistical organizations, make this 
possible. The Institute ^\"ill have an easy task in dealing with the world's trade 
in dairy products because imports and exports are dealt with in the returns of 
the Customs Departments. There exists a difficulty in the diversity of classifi- 
cation of products. The Institute for the present will have to rely chiefly on the 
simple classification proposed by the Brussels Convention of 1913, which provides 
for data under three heads — milk, butter and cheese — because the actual 
statistical data of the adhering countries could be easily brought into these three 
classifications, although eventually the aim would be to secure more detailed 
information on other milk products. 

Mr. Anders Fjelstad, Delegate for Norway on the Permanent Committee, 
in the report to which reference has just been made furnishes a lengthy statistical 
statement of the world's position as to numbers of milk cows and the trade in 
milk and milk products, from which it can be appreciated how great are the 
difficulties that have to be surmounted for an efficient international service. 
Comparison in numbers of cows is made between the year 1913 and each of the 
years 1918 to 1922; the trade figures cover all the years from 1909 to 1922. 

Dr. Asher Hobson, Delegate for the United States on the Permanent Com- 
mittee, introduced in his report the subject of a universal classification for 
cotton. The United States, he states, has established a national classification 
for cotton, as well as for the major portion of other agricultural products. (The 
Reporter might have applied the latter statement also to Canada). An inter- 
national classification is now expedient. Ten years ago in the United States 
that question was from the national point of view about in the position it is 
to-day from the international point of view. Hence, at his instance a resolution 
was adopted by the Permanent Committee, recognizing that all the countries 
interested should establish a universal classification of the type qualities of 
cotton in order to arrive at a uniform system of classification, such as the 
Institute has been endeavouring to realize for other agricultural products, in 
order thus to promote and facilitate international trade in agricultural products. 
The Institute is to stress to tiie governments interested the advantages of a 
universal classification for cotton, securing the views of the producers, the 
manufacturers and commercial associations, as well as of the consumers, so as 
to form a sound basis for further future action. 

The Vice-President of the Institute, Mr. Louis Dop, presented another series 
of his important reports on agricultural meteorology', which reviews the world's 
activities on the subject. His recommendations for future action are based 
largely on the resolutions of the Conference of meteorological directors assembled 
at Utrecht in September, 1923. The International Committee on Agricultural 
Meteorology- is to meet at Rome in May to formulate their views as experts on 
the various recommendations, and the International Institute at its General 
Assembly is to formulate its decision and appeal to the various governments to 
invite their Meteorological Stations to co-operate along the lines of co-ordina- 
tion of effort, systematization, centralization and publication of all the questions 
in their relations to agricultural products. Particular mention is made of 
Canadian collaboration with the Institute in the way of contributing valuable 
studies of the Canadian Meteorological Station. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 111 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

Tlie report of Dr. Ashcr Hobson on agricultural statistics is the basis for 
the foliownng recommendations of the Permanent Committee (summarily 
expressed) : That arrangements be made to ensure the rapid collection and 
transmission of unofHcial a? well as official information, the permission of the 
governments for transmission of unofficial information having been previously 
obtained. That the governments continue their efforts to amplify their statis- 
tical services so as to embrace the information concerning the new data (re 
cotton and dairy products) which the Institute desires. That the telegraphic 
service should be ultimately developed in the measure justified by the extension 
given by the adhering governments to their statistical services. That greater 
attention should be given to the preparation of monographs and special studies 
on methods of statistics as applied to agriculture. The report stresses the use- 
fulness of a gcnereal census by all the adhering countries at the same date 
1930-31 on a uniform plan. It stresses the importance of engaging the adhering 
governments to follow out these various recommendations and to conduct a well 
considered study as a basis and preparation of a programme which will be 
submitted to an international conference of experts in 192G. 

The lengthy report of Dr. Valentino Dore, Chief of the Institute's Statistical 
Service, present tables of striking importance showing the progressive improve- 
ment of the Institute's services even in the last three years, 1921-23, and showing 
the increased number of countries that have perfected their systems of statistics 
so as to furnish the data in the manner and with the promptness desired for the 
various products. The results of these improvements and of the more important 
ones which the Institute has brought about from the beginning of its work 
fifteen years ago in the way of available statistics, have gradually come to be 
regarded by the agricultural and other press of North America as common 
property. Sir Thomas Elliott is to present the following proposals of the 
British Government: — 

1. That in view of the provisdons of Article 9 (6) of the Conveation of 7th June, 1905, 
the Institute should be regarded as the seat and centre of all voluntary international action 
for the development of agriculture. 

2. That international organizations concerned with agriculture or desirous of obtaoning 
the support of agriculturists should be invited to place themselves in communication with 
the Institute with a xnew to secure the co-ordination of the arrangements to be made 
with regard to^ 

(a) the dates and places of their meetings, 

(fa) the publication of their resolutions, proces-verbaux and reports, 

(c) the constitution of their permanent bureaux, if any, and 

(d) any other matters likely to be of interest to agriculturists generally. 

3. That the adhering Governments be invited to take the foregoing resolutions into 
their consideration and to adopt such measures as they may think desirable in order to 
give effect to them. 

A report of the French Government concludes with the following recom- 
mendations: — 

That the Vllth General Assembly of the International Institute of Agriculture: — 

1. Should request the adhering States to establish among .Agricultural Associations and 
Socdeties an active propaganda for the encouragement among farmers of the idea of agri- 
cultural progress, which is indissolubly cormected with peaceful development in international 
relations. 

2. Should instruct the Permanent Committee to enter into communication with the 
various Associations in order, in agreement with them, to discover the best practical methods 
for influencing public opinion throughout the world, basing this propaganda on the necessity 
for the order^ tranquility and peace of the agricultural population in each country. 

The United States Government is to introduce the resolution " that con- 
sideration be given to the admittance of agricultural and other associations as 



112 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

associate members of the Institute." Madam Olivia Rossetti Agresti, Secretary 
of the late David Lubin, has been an ardent promoter of this recommendation. 
She states (January, 1924) that '' the original intention of the founder of the 
Institute was to establish a World Chamber of Agriculture to which the volun- 
tary agricultural associations would appoint their representatives. This would 
have formed an international advisory bodj' for promoting the intereests of 
agriculture, more especially in the field of economics." 

Quite apart from the decisions which these various Institute reports seek 
to bring about, the value of the ascertained facts and information therein con- 
tained, and not heretofore assembled in any other single series of publications, 
should not be under-estimated. 

Of the $15,000 voted by the Canadian Parliament for the International 
Institute of Agriculture, approximately S9,500 arc for the direct contributions 
and about $5,500 are for the maintenance of the Canadian oflBce. The greater 
part of the latter fund is for the acquisition of books, periodicals and stationery 
for the Institute Library. The distance from Ottawa to the headquarters of 
the Institute requires, for an exchange of correspondence, from 25 to 30 days, 
hence the expediency of the creation in 1910 of the Canadian office, an out- 
standing function of which is to reproduce in Canada the essential features of 
the Institute's work in Rome, to adapt it, in so far as possible, to Canadian 
needs, and ensure that its decisions shall exert a direct influence on Canadian 
agriculture. This it has been heretofore enabled to do in a certain measure 
through its communications to the Agricultural Gazette and the agricultural 
press, and through its library. 

Apart from the Institute Branch's allotted task to disseminate useful infor- 
mation emanating from the Institute, there has been a great deal of advertising 
abroad of Canada, her products, her agricultural achievements, and of her leading 
experts through the Institute's various monthly and annual publications. A 
considerable portion of space devoted to Canada has been secured through the 
efforts of the Branch, whose duty it is to keep the Institute constantly supplied 
with information concerning Canadian agriculture, including full details for- 
warded by cable throughout the year in regard to her various products. Canada's 
pre-eminence as a leading agricultural country, and chiefly as a producer of 
cereals, has been freciucntly asserted in the Institute's publications. These publi- 
cations circulate widely among our prospective purchasers in Europe. 

The Institute collects and publishes, and this Branch disseminates in sum- 
marized form, to the extent of the means placed at its disposal, agricultural 
information other than statistics. Canadian farmers are vitally interested in 
learning how Germany grows more grain and live stock per acre than any other 
country; how Argentina and Australia succeed with their chilled meats and 
systems of shipping and marketing them; how Denmark beats the world in the 
British markets with its bacon and butter. (Abstract from Rt. Hon. Lloyd 
George's speech, October 1919). Our Departmental officers, are concerned with 
the local or Canadian national work in direct contact with the farmers, attend 
meetings, Conferences, Conventions, and International Congresses. The Insti- 
tute steps in at the final stage and at the General Assembly and Permanent 
Committee meetings and in its publications discusses the results, and formulates 
decisions for universal adoption. It is the permanent institution established for, 
among other objects, giving universal and practical effect to the resolutions of 
congresses, hence the Institute, in addition to other means towards the attain- 
ment of this end, also collects and summarizes for each country the published 
results of its national or local work, including research and scientific investi- 
gations. 

The Institute Branch frequently elaborates and publishes the Institute's 
data on the world's food and feeds, important factors in the formation of market 
prices, so that the aggregate supply and demand may be clearly understood and 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 113 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 16 

taken adx-antage of by producers, their agents and the shippers. These interests 
liave had to market abroad this year an average of about one million bushels of 
wlieat per day. 

The International Yearbook of Agricultural Statistics for 1922 was published 
in September last. Beginning with this issue the Yearbook, instead of being 
published only once every two years, is made an annual. It is also more adapted 
to the convenience of English speaking readers than were previous issues. It 
contains complete data of population, area and production of crops, international 
trade in and prices of agricultural products, ocean freight rates, numbers of live 
stock, etc., in all countries for the years 1919 to 1922 and the average for the 
period 1909-1913. 

The twelfth volume of The International Yearbook of Agricultural Legis- 
lation, containing the more important legislation enacted in the different countries 
in 1922 was received. It contains the complete text of many laws on trade in 
agricultural products, farm machinery, and live stock, and laws that promote 
the activity of those engaged in agriculture, regulate co-operation and co-oper- 
ative credit, etc. The titles only of a large number of laws of local interest are 
given. 

The necessaiy information concerning Canada for these two Yearbooks as 
well as all other information required by the Institute, including regular reports 
on the Canadian crops and statistics of imports and exports was furnished by 
this Brancli throughout the year. Articles and monographs were prepared for 
publication in the Institute reviews. Several articles analyzing the world's 
crop situation were published. 

The original Institute publications were distributed to selected lists of 
officials and agronomists throughout Canada. Summaries of articles in the 
Reviews as well as special articles on the world's wheat situation and the world's 
live stock were published in the Agricultural Gazette. The foreign agricultural 
intelligence service of the Branch furnished a great deal of information to 
correspondents during the year. Information on the subjects discussed by the 
Committee were supplied to the Special Committee of the House of Commons 
Investigating Agricultural Conditions and, on agricultural credit, to the 
Honourary Advisory Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. 

The Library. — The branch makes available its Library's considerable 
resources to research workers and others who, in large numbers, make personal 
visits or, through correspondence, consult the branch's Library and Periodical 
Room, borrow books and secure bibliographies. The Branch records show that 
the benefits of these resources are enjoyed by a larger number of scientific 
specialists and administrators outside than within the Department of Agri- 
culture, no doubt because the objects of the Institute are so wide and all- 
embracing, with the accumulated resources of the Library correspondingly so. 
Borrowers' Record: — 

Borrowers Books 

Department of Agriculture 117 1,303 

Ottawa (exclusive of Department of -■Vgriculture) 152 1,013 

Ontario (exclusive of Ottawa) 90 452 

Quebec 92 436 

Manitoba 37 206 

Saskatchewan 42 200 

Alberta 22 117 

British Columbia 39 254 

Xova Scotia 19 157 

New Brunswick 16 104 

Prince Edward Island 11 95 

United States 1 13 

Total 638 4,340 



114 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
The various agricultural colleges borrowed as follows: — 

Borrowers Books 

Ontario ARricultural College 18 190 

University of British Columbia 16 135 

Manilobii Auricultural College II 57 

Cniversitv of Alberta 8 31 

Miu-donaia College 23 118 

Institut Agrirole d'Oka 9 36 

( 'olleiie d'Agriculture, Ste. Anne de la Pocatiere, P.Q 13 145 

Agricultural College. Truro, N.S 8 65 

University of Saskatchewan 15 77 

Card Catalogues. — The total number of cards in the catalogues is approxi- 
mately 245,548, including: — 

Shelf list 8.?l5 

United States Department of Agriculture 3a, uo 

Kxpcriment Stations 39. 100 

Continuations of Series 2.888 

Special veterinary catalogue 3. 350 

Librar>' of Congress depository catalogue 92. 500 

General catalogue 58. 675 

Unfiled cards ■ 4. 285 

,4 rrcssions.— Nine hundred and fortj'-two bound volumes were acquired by 
purchase, gift, exchange and binding, made up as follows: by exchange or gift 
and bound, 199; through entry on mimeographed book review list, 177; by 
exchange of Agricultural Gazette and other departmental publications, 286; 
by gift, 86; by purchase, 194. The average cost of the purchased books is 
considerably less than the cost of the volumes bound for the Librarj' by the 
Printing Bureau. There is a decrease in the total number of accessioned vol- 
umes owing to the greatly decreased number of books bound. Ten thousand 
seven hundred and thirty-seven unbound books and pamphlets were received, 
of which 8,731 were continuations of series. There are now 12,768 bound 
volumes in the Library, but as the unbound material is greatly in excess of the 
bound, we estimate the Library as representing 22,500 volumes of one and a 
half inches each by actual measurement. 

Periodicals. — Eleven thousand six hundred and sixty-five periodicals 
(pieces) were received representing 114 Canadian, 170 American, 58 from the 
British Isles and 251 from other countries, making a total of 593 titles. Of 
these 152 were subscribed for, and the others secured free of charge. 

Booklists. — Descriptive lists of the most important accessions — excluding 
bulletins, proceedings, reports, etc. — were sent to a mailing list of agricultural 
officials and professors four times during the year. 

New Work. — The Library of Congress has agreed to print catalogue cards 
for the more important series of bulletins of the Federal Department of Agri- 
culture. We prepared cards for the bulletins of the new series and the bulletins 
of the Entomological Branch. To date, cards for thirty bulletins have been 
received. Others are now in their hands and will be printed shortly. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. R. MOTHERWELL, 

Minister of Agriculture. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT 



NATIONAL DEFENCE 



CANADA 



FOR THE 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 
1924 



(MILITIA SERVICE) 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 



UO— »-24. 
KO-t-a 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING S MOdT EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1924 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 



To General His Excellency the Right Honourable Lord Byng oj Vimy, G.C.B., 
G.C.M.G., M.V.O., Governor General and Commander-in-Chief of the 
Do7ninion of Canada. 

May it Please Yovr Excellency: 

The undersigned has the honour to present to Your Excellency the report of 
the Department of National Defence (Militia Service) for the fiscal year ending 
March 31, 1924. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Department of N.\tion.al Defence, 
Ott.\wa, November 15, 1924. 



E. M. MACDONALD, 
Minister of National Defence. 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 



Ottawa, November 12, 1924. 
The Honourable the Minister, 

Department of National Defence, 

Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit for your consideration, to be laid on the 
Table of the House, this the Annual Report of the Department of National 
Defence (Militia Service), for the fiscal year 1923-24. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

G. fJ. DESBARATS, 

Deputy Minister. 



17— ij 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 



CONTENTS 

Reports of: Page 

The Chief of Staff 5 

The Adjutant General 54 

The Quartermaster General 65 

The Chief Accountant 80 

The Assistant Deputy Minister 83 

The Judge Advocate General 85 

The Director of Contracts 86 

Appendices: 

A, B— Financial Statements 88 to 99 

C — Report of the Superintendent, Dominion Arsenal, Quebec. . 100 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 



REPORT OF THE 



DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE, CANADA 
(MILITIA SERVICE) 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1924 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF STAFF FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
MARCH 31, 1924 

(1) Military Policy and Organization for Defence. 

The organization of the Department of National Defence has progressed 
slowly during the period under review, especially with regard to the inclusion 
of the Navy and the amalgamation of its ancillary' services with those of the 
Militia and Air Force. 

The Defence Council commenced to function on January 31, 1924. and the 
formation of the Departmental Defence Committee is still under consideration. 

Attention is again drawn to the fact that there is no defensive gas equip- 
ment nor have we been able to purchase any tractors or tanks. 

The General Staff reports have been subdivided into Directorates and are 
as follows: — 

(2) Military Operations and Intelligence Directorate. 

(3) Training and Stafif Duties Directorate. 

(4) Cadet Services Directorate. 

(5) Historical Section. 

(6) The Royal Canadian Air Force Directorate. 

The foregoing reports detail fully the various aspects of the work per- 
formed by the Directorates of the General Staff, but it is considered that a few 
comments on the principal features will not be out of place. 

Surveys 

It is interesting to note that the Military' Survey Division has surveyed 
and mapped a total area of 39,207 square miles since the division was first 
established. The Board of Topographical Surveys and Mapping is functioning 
and representatives of the Interior Department have been co-operating with 
surveyors from the Military Surveys Division in producing the Warwick Sheet, 
Quebec. 

Training 

With regard to training, the money available was expended on the training 
of oflScers, non-commissioned efficers and specialists, there not being sufficient 
funds to devote to training on a larger scale. In this connection, the time 
has now arrived when officers liavc become tired of training skeleton formation.* 
and the interest is waning. It i? most discouraging to those commanding 
oflScers who have brought their units up to full strength by their enthusiastic 



6 NATIOXAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

work, and at considerable personal expense, not to be given an opportunity of 
training the unit in a proper manner. It is, therefore, important that facilities 
should be made available to train larger numbers of the rank and file. 

The number trained during the period under review at local headquarters 
and camps was approximately 38,000 as compared with 34,000 the previous 
season. The total establishment calls for about 130,000 all ranks, and if the 
appropriation cannot be increased, the only alternative is the reduction and 
reorganization of the number of units that we are attempting to maintain. To 
obtain the efficiency desired, the whole of the peace establishment of the Cana- 
dian Militia should be trained from twelve to sixteen days. 

Our expenditure on defence per head of population is SI .46, or about $2.99 
out of every $100 of total expenditure. This compares with the leading nations 
of the world as follows: — 



— 


Expenditure 
on Defence 
per head of 
Population 


Amount 
devoted to 
Defence out 

of every 
$100 of total 
expenditure 




$ 

1 46 

23 04 

3 30 

2 33 

4 27 

6 51 
4 13 

13 37 

24 66 
16 US 

4 34 

7 87 
404 


2 99 


Great Britain , 


19 96 


Australia .....i 


.<> 95 


New Zraland . 


2 08 


fvjuth .Vfrira 


5 38 


Unite! States 


16 96 


Argentine Republic 


17 .55 




10 96 




20 16 


Italy 


15 87 


Japan , 


36 00 


The Netherlands 


14 17 




15 43 







Owing to the need for economy the training of the Permanent Force had 
to be kept down to the minimum, and for the same reason there was an insuffi- 
cient number of instructors and trained personnel for demonstration purposes 
in connection with the training of the Non-permanent Active Militia. As is 
pointed out in the report, the Instructional Cadre deserve credit for the work 
accomplished by their limited establishment, considering that the number of 
personnel of the Non-permanent Active Militia attending courses at Royal and 
Permanent Schools was double that of the previous year. The need for more 
extensive artillery training is being felt, especially with regard to mounted 
training for light and medium artillery units. 

The Militia Staff Course again proved verj- popular. Forty-five candidates 
attended the Practical portion during the summer of 1923, all of whom obtained 
" m.s.c." certificates. 

Royal Canadian Corps of Signals 

Attention is in\-ited to the report of the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals, 
especially that portion dealing with radio-telegraphy in conjunction with the 
Royal Canadian Air Force and for the Department of the Interior. The work 
commenced for the Royal Canadian Air Force during 1921 has been success- 
fully continued. Stations at Winnip)eg, at Norway House and at Victoria 
Beach on lake Winnipeg have been installed and are operated by the Royal 
Canadian Air Force in connection with forestrj- patrols for the Manitoba Gov- 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 7 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

ernmcnt. The radio-telephone work at High River, Alberta, has provcil of 
immense value in the suppression of numerous outbreaks of forest fires. Com- 
munication between High River, Alberta, and the Manitoba radio system has 
been maintained, the distance being approximately 790 miles. 

A radio-telegraph system exUniding from Etlmonton up the Mackenzie 
river and across into the Yukon has been commence<i for the Department of 
the Interior. The complete system includes statioas at Dawson City and 
Mayo in the Yukon, and at Herschel Island, Fort Simpson and Fort Smith 
in the Mackenzie Basin, with a southern terminal at Edmonton. The equip- 
ment necessary- was constructed by the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals and 
the first complete high powered -set was completed in July, 1923. The first 
two stations were put into operation in October, 1923, between Dawson and 
Mayo, and are working satisfactorily. 

Canadian Small Anns School 

The results obtained by the Small Arms School are very encouraging, 
especially with regard to the weapon training courses both for the Permanent 
and Non-Permanent Active Militia. The standard attained by the Permanent 
units compared favourably with that of the Britannic Forces. 

Historical Section 

The report of the Historical Section is "of much interest. It is regretted 
that unexpected delay occurred in connection with the printing of the History 
of the Canadian Medical Services in the Great War, and it is hoped that the 
work will be proceeded with during the coming summer. 

Much assistance has been rendered by this directorate to the Battle Honours 
Committee. The preparation of statements showing the composition of each bat- 
talion in the fieltl at the end of each month, throughout the war entailed much 
research. 

Cadets 

With regard to Cadets, the reduction of $100,000 in the vote for the previous 
year necessitated the cancellation of camps, consequently many units lost interest 
and became reduced in numbers. However, against this loss, 65 units were 
organi7ed during the period under review, bringing the total number of enrolled 
Cadets to 110,120. It will be noted that very considerable progress in marks- 
manship was made by the Canadian boys, practically one team in even.' four 
reaching the prize list, an improvement of 100 per cent on their performance for 
the previous year. This reflects great credit upon the Instructors of competing 
units. 

It is pointed out that unless cadet training, which is now recei\'ing the 
wholehearted -supiwrt of educationalists and medical authorities, is to be seri- 
ously curtailed increased appropriations are necessary-. In the year 1913-14 
with a strength of 47,039, the sum of $390,500 was voted for cadet services. In 
1923-24, with a strength of 110,120, the sum of $450,000 was provided. 

Royal Canadian Air Force 

The Royal Canadian Air Force has been placed on a permanent basis and 
is operated as a Directorate of the Chief of Staff Branch. King's Regulations 
and Orders for the Royal Canadian Air Force as well as Pay Regulations, have 
been promulgated. 



8 NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Cadet officers for the Royal Canadian Air Force are being furnished from 
the Royal Military College and from the Officers Training Corps, arrangements 
having been made to train these cadets at Camp Borden during the summer 
vacation, and tiic pfliomr i* meeting with great success. The annexed report 
contains detailed information regarding this subject. 

The work in connection with the aerial sur\'ey and forestry protection has 
been extended in the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta. 

Full particulars regarding this work are contained in the report covering 
Civil Aviation and Operations of the Royal Canadian Air Force for C\v\\ Depart- 
ments during 1923, which has already been published. 

(2) Military Operations and Intelligence 
Opejations 
Further att<>ntion has been given to the work referred to in the annual 
report of 1922-23. Nearly all questions of militarj' policy have been referred to 
this directorate for investigation and report. Close attention has been given to 
all international questions to study their effect on the arrangements for national 
defence. Some of the questions considered were: — 

1. The Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Deep Water\vay. 

2. Hudson Bay Railway and route. 

3. Revision of the Rush-Bagot Treaty. 

4. League of Nations, and various reports called for by the temporarj- Mixed 

Commission. 
Control of manufacture of arms and munitions by private firms. Colonel 
David Carnegie consulted this department before he submitted his 
scheme concerning the limitation of private manufacture to the sub- 
committee appointed to investigate that subject. 

Mohilization 

IMorc study and work in connection with mobilization has been carried out. 

The Director has been appointed the Chairman of the Sub-committee for 
the purpose of drafting the Mobilization Regulations for the general mobiliza- 
tion of the Canadian Militia. 

Intelligence 

The collection, collation and distribution of military intelligence has been 
continued with as great efficiency as possible in view of the lack of funds set 
aside for the purpose. 

The directorate can give in a short time a fair report on almost any military 
or related question. 

Organization and Liaison 

Questions of military organization, localization of unit's of *he Non-Per- 
manent Militia and establishments have been referred to this directorate for 
concurrence or criticism. 

The officers of this directorate have been required to give a good deal of 
time as presidents or members of various militarj- court's, boards and commit- 
tees. 

The Assistant Director of Military Intelligence has been required to devote 
a large portion of his time to the perusal, correction and circulation of the 
Annual Inspection reports. This work was formerly done by the Branch of 
the Inspector General. 

The officers of the directorate have spent considerable time in research 
work and in lecturing. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICEX 9 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

Departmental Library 

The work of reclassification and recataloguing, as mentioned in last year's 
report, lias gone on, and at the end of the fiscal year, 6,046 volumes were 
reclassified and rccatalogued: there remain about 4,000 bound volumes and 
many pamphlets, etc., to be attended to. 

One hundred and forty-seven new volumes dealing with militarj- questions 
were ordered during the year, of which 104 were received, together with 20 
ordered in tiie previous year. 

Nine ^■olumes were presented to the Library. 

Various sen-ice papers, periodicals and other publications of interest to 
the service have been received and circulated. 

Press clippings of interest to militan,-, naval and air force officers have 
been circulated daily. 

Military Survey Division 

Survey work was carried out in Ontario, Quebec and Alberta. 

The Course of Instruction in Surveying, beginning February 1, 1923, was 
completed December 22: of the class of ten ttUdng tliis course, five obtained 
certificates as topographic surveyors. A new course was begun Januarj' 2, 
1924, which will be terminated at Christmas, 1924. 

The Sur\-ey Di\-ision was established in 1902, and the carrj'ing on of 
topographic surveys and production of maps has, from that time to the present, 
been steadily and systematically proceeded ^-ith. At the present time the area 
of countrj' accurately sur\-eyed and mapped is as follows: — - 

.\ri;a surveyed and maps published 30,607 sq. miles 

.\rea fully sun-eyed, not yet mapped 3,440 " 

Area partly surveyed .5, 160 " 



39,207 



Stan(l:ir<l maps published, 1' to 1 mile 
Standard maps published, 4' to I mile. 



The new offset preSs has been used to print all tlie later one-inch sheets 
and much other work, and has already proved its ^eat value . The elimination 
of the long, difficult and expensive photo-etching process \nll reduce the cost 
of reproduction ver>- considerably, while the beauty and accuracy of printing 
are most satisfactory. 

Five Dominion land surveyors, detailed by the Director General of Sur- 
veys, Department of the Interior, at the request of the Department of National 
Defence, to co-operate in the survey being carried out in Quebec by the Survey 
Division, were under instruction in this office for about one month, and two 
weeks in the field under a topograpiiic super\asor of this department. This was 
for instniction in topography before taking over the topographic field work 
of the Warwick sheet, Quebec: the complete control having been finislied by 
the Sun-ey Di^-ision in 1922. This party, with assistant*, left June 1 for Quebec 
and during the season completed one hundred and seventy-seven miles of tlie 
Warwick sheet. This work was carried out under our supervision. A special 
grant of $7,500 was allotted by the Interior Department for 1923, which has 
been increasetl for 1924 to $9,000, for the completion of tiie Warwick sheet. 

Control. — The sun'eys for the control of new one-inch sheet's being at 
least one year in advance of the topographers, no further work of this nature 
was done, except at Camp Sarcee. Three sun-eyors, under the supervisor of 
control, left for Calgar>- in June and completed the full control for the Camp 
Sarcee map by the end of August. This work was as follows: — 

Primary ehained traverse 85 miles 

Re' ondarj- Traverse 70 " 

Levellin);' \o5 " 



10 NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Magnetic Declination. — The supennsor of control determined the declina- 
tion at a definite point on the ground in eighteen map sheets, five of these 
being new. The remainder were repeat \'isits to sheets where the declination 
had been obtained from ten to fifteen years ago. 

Long Branch Survey. — Early in October directions were received to make 
an accurate detail survey at 200 feet to 1 inch with 2-foot contours of all 
Government property, at Long Branch, near Toronto; about four hundred and 
fifty acres. A party of six, later eight, left for Toronto October 12 and com- 
pleted the survey in about one month. The work was carried out with great 
care, both as to survey and draughting, and to preserve the accuracy of the 
field work in the map, it was printed in black only. 

Rei'ision. — An officer, with three topographers, began tTie rcNnsion in the 
field of the four one-inch sheets — Toronto, Brampt<in, Markham and Bolton. 
This was required to bring the survey work up to date before the production 
of the Toronto half-inch sheet, which will include the detail of the above four 
sheet's. Re\'ision was completed December 22. 

Topography. — On April 17, revision of the Ottawa sheet was begun, and 
completed with field work examined by July 1. Any changes to this sheet in 
future revisions should now be of the nature of additions, rather than correc- 
tions. 

As the topographers finished their work in the Ottawa district they left 
for Quebec, with the exception of three, who proceeded June 1 for the Camp 
Sarccc sun'cy, the control for this being under the supen'isor of control, the 
topography and examination of field work under a senior topographer. 

In Quebec, the Arthabaska and Scottstown sheets, partly surveyed last 
season, were completed as well as all the Mcgantic sheets. 

On two occasions the Director of Military Operations and Intelligence 
inspected the work in the field. The interest thus shown in the work being 
carried out by the men was much appreciated by them. 

Total topography completed: — 

Sheet 

Ottawa 

Scottstown 

Meeantic 

Arthabaska 

Sarcce 



^alo 


Area 


o' 


440 miles 


r 


110 " 


2' 


40.i " 


V 


94 " 


V 


76 " 



Total. 



The present condition of the field and draughting work is as follows: — 

Districts fully controlled, ready for topographers. — Ontario, 6 — Grand 
Bend, St. Marys. Stratford, Alliston," Barrie, Beavcrton. Quebec, 6 — St. Syl- 
vestre, Thetford. Disraeli. Warwick, St. Evariste, Armstrong. 

Districts fully surveyed, ready for draughtsmen. — Quebec, 3 — Arthabaska, 
Scottstown, Mcgantic. Nova Scotia, 3 — Bras d'Or. Mira, Louisburg. 

Ready for printing, 2 — Malvina, 1-inch; Drummond, ^-inch. 

Draughting. — Work in the hands of the draughtsmen and engraver, 6 sheets: 
1-inch, Ottawa; Lyster, Que.; Sydney, Louisburg and Glace Bay, N.S. ; ^-inch, 
Toronto. 

Printing.' — The following new maps and diagrams were printed: — 

Standard 1' sheets: — Uniacke, Yamaska, Becancour, Aston, Three Rivers, La Patrie, 

Woburn 6.262 

Other maps, 20 Tnirn. Gallipoli Campaign (6), History P.P.C.L.I. (11), Lonn 

Branch (2) 26.298 

DiaRr.ims, etc., 49.. .Different S.813 

Reprints 1' and »'•• Sheets (14) 9.990 

51,361 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

Maps and Diagraitis issued — 

I' and i' sheets frrc to various Government departments 7,468 

1' and i' sheets sold to public 7,0'0 

Special maps 25, 396 

Diagrams 8.813 



48.727 

Photographs (80) WS 

Lantern slides 729 



Total documents 



(3) Military Training and Staff Duties 

TRAINING 

Remarks. — The small increase in the annual drill vote over that allotted 
for last year was not sufficient to warrant any material change in the pro- 
gramme of training. As only sufficient funds were available to train a smsiU 
proportion of selected unit?, it became increasingly difficult to maintain in the 
Active Militia that interest and keenness so essential to successful results in 
training. While the organization of existing units remained intact, a general 
advance in efficiency could not be expected. 

Similarly to last year, the available funds were devoted principally to tlte 
training of officers and N.C.O.s, and while in this essential respect satisfactory 
progress was made, it cannot be considered that this programme alone will 
bring the Militia of Canada to a satisfactory state of efficiency. 

It is now an urgent necessity that unit training on a comprehensive scale 
be resumed. 



12 NATIOXAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
PERMANENT FORCE 

Owing to their reduced strength and hea^y calls for instructional duty 
with the Non-Permanent Active Militia, it has not been possible to concentrate 
the personnel of Permanent Force units for camp and combined training. 

The training of the personnel available was therefore carried out in the 
respective areas under arrangements made by the District Officers Command- 
ing. The following units proceeded to camp for training as shown, but with 
the exception of those marked * were withdrawn for strike duty in Nova Scotia 
before completion of training. 



Unit 


From 


To 


Via 


Date 


Remarks 


Station 


Camp 


From 


To 


R.C.D.— 

Headquarters "B" Squa- 
dron {les.s detachment) 


Toronto 

Toronto 

St. Jean. 

Calgary 

Winnipeg 

Calgary 

Kingston 

Kingston 

Kingston 

Winnipeg 

Kingston 

Kingston 

Halifax 

Halifax 

Kingston 

Esquimalt.. 

Toronto 

Halifax 






May 27 
May 27 


Aug. 21. 
Aug. 21.'. 




Petawawa. .. 

Niagara 

Local 


RaU 






RaU 


July 25 




L.R.H. (R.C.)- 
Hoadquarters % 


Sarcee 

Hughes 

Sarcee 

Petawawa. . 

Petawawa 

Petawawa... 

Hughes 

Sarcee 

Petawawa 

Petawawa 

McNab Is . 
Sandwich Bty 

Petawawa. . 
Rodd Hill.. 

Niagara 

McNab Is 


Mch. R 

RaU 

Mch. R 

RaU 

RaU 


June 4. . 
June 18. 
June 4. . 

May 27 
May 27 


Sept. 6. 
Aug. 15.. 
Sept. 8 

Aug. 3 
Aug. 3 
-■Vug. 3 
Aug. 3 
Aug. 24.. 
Aug. 3 
Aug. 3.. 

June 16 
June 28 
Sept. 19 

Aug. 3 
Oct. 1 

.\UK. 6 
June 28 
Oct. 6 
Aug. 15.. 

Sept. 15 
Oct. 10 
Sept. 15 
Sept. 15.. 

Sept. 15 

Aug. 15 
June 14 
Aug. 15.. 
Aug. 15.. 
June 27 
.\ug. 15. 

Sept. 15 








Ji.C.H.A.- 








"B" Battery 

"C" Battery % 


RaU 

RaU 


May 27 
May 27 




B.C. H. A. Band* 


RaU 

RaU 

RaU 

Boat 

Boat 

RaU 

Mch. R... 

Boat 

Boat 

Mch. R 

RaU 

Boat 

Boat 

RaU 

RaU 

Mch. R 

RaU 

RaU 

RaU 

Mch. R 

RaU 

Mch. R 

Mch. R 

RaU 

Boat 


June 24 
June 11 
July 2 

May 7. 
June 18. 
Aug. 6 

Mfiv 27. 
.\ug. 20.. 

July 6. 
June 18. 
Aug. 6 
July 4 

Aug. 15.. 
Sept. 15 
May 31 
Aug. 15.. 

June 8 
June 22 

July <a 
Aug. 15.. 

June 29 
June I 
June 29 
July 4 
.June 14 
June 29 

June 1 




R.Xt.C. Ridinn Estah 

(Detach, only) 
R.C.A. — 

No. 1 Bty. R.C.A. * 

(C.A.) 

No. 2 Bty. R.C.A. (O.A.)* 

No. 3 Bty. R.C.A. (M.A.). 
No. 5 Bty. R.C.A. (C.A.).. 

R.C.E.— 

No. 2 net 

No. 6 Det. * 

No. 11 Det. * 

R.r.R.— 


1 Battle 
f Practice 
JOct.8-13. 

Battle Prac- 
tice Sept. 
24 to Oct. 
1. 


Esquimalt 

London 

Halifax 


Rodd Hill.. 

Niagara 

McNab Is . 




".\" Company % 

;;b;' (m.g.)Co 




London 

Montreal 

Winnipeg 

Winnipeg 

Esquimalt... . 
Winnipeg 

Quebec 

Quebec 

Quebec. 


Niagara 

Pointc Aux 
Trembles. . . 

Longueuil — 

Pointe Aux 
Trembles. . . 

Niagara 

Hughes 

St. Charles 

Hughes 

Heals 


Small Arms 




Training at 
Cove Ran- 
ges. 


P.P.C.L.I.— 












"D" (M.G.), Co 


St. Charles. . . 
Hughes 

Levis 




R. SSnd Regiment — 




"A" Company 

"B" Company 





NATIONAL DEFENCE (.MILITIA SERVICE) 13 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

NON-PERMANENT ACTIVE MILITIA 

Unit Training. — Central camps were held to a very limited extent, other- 
wise, unit training (except artillerj-) was carried out at local camps or local 
Headquarters for a period of 9 days and, units in general were necessarily 
restricted to an a^■crage strcngtli of 40 per cent. 

Detachments of m.obilc artillery batteries were permitted two days' train- 
ing at local headquarters and 8 days at practice camp for firing detachments. 
The coast artillery were allowed eight days at local headquarters and four days' 
practice at tlie forts. 

The following table shows the training completed by units of the Non- 
permanent Active Militia during the financial year 1923-24. 





Local Training 


Camp and 
Camp Schools 




All ranks 


Men days 


All ranks 


Men days 


Military District A'o. t— 


269 
66 

35 

33 
31 

24 

50 
13 
71 
116 
177 
116 
218 
346 
217 
54 
195 
319 
194 
216 
35 
211 
610 
340 

27 
37 


2,326 
564 

70 

66 
62 

129 

282 

101 
• 588 

672 
1,255 

940 
1,602 
2,139 
1,792 

478 
1,111 
2,334 
1,197 
1,637 

288 
1,383 
3,536 
2,069 

243 
114 






9th f Grev's) Horse 






7th Brigade C.F. A.— 

12th (London) Battery 


37 

34 
34 


259 


Ilth Brigade C. FA.— 

I6th Battery 


29th Battery 


269 


1st Divisional Engineers — 


1st Signal C.C.S.— 






No. 1 Cyelist Co. C. of G 






Western University Contingent C.O.T.C 






Onlari.) Agricultural College Cent., C.O.T.C... 






1st Bn. The Perth Regt 






1st Bn. M iddlesex Light Infantry 


39 


327 


1st Bn. Huron Regiment 


Ist Bn. The Western Ontario Regt 






1st Bn. Bruee Regiment 






1st Bn. Oxford Rifles 






1st Bn. Highland Light InL of C 






1st Bn. Wellington Rifles 






1st Bn. North Waterloo Regiment 














35 




1st Bn. Essex Fusiliers 




1st Bn. Kent Regiment 






2nd Machine Gun Brigade 






1st Divisional Train — 












Military District Xo. t— 


291 
136 
21 

27 

29 
35 
37 
35 

36 
34 
37 


2 147 


2nd Dragoons 






999 


1st Regt. Ontario Mounted Rifles 


135 
32 

44 
46 
42 
44 

44 

38 
42 
42 

17 
20 

81 


989 
171 

338 
352 
320 
297 

340 
338 
259 
378 

110 
113 

527 




10th Brant Dragoons 


317 


3rd Brigade C.F. A.— 

9th Toronto Battery 


232 


15th Batterj- 




30th Battery 


296 


53rd Battery 




8th Brigade C.F.A.— 

11th (Hamilton) Battery 


250 


10th ISt. Catharines) Bty 


272 


40th Batterv 




54th Batterv 




2nd Divisional Engineers — 

2nd Field Company 












2nd Signal Bn. C.C.S.— 

Headquarters 1 

No. 2 Signal Company \ 

No. 14 Signal Company J 


50 


629 



14 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (.MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



Local Training 



All ranks Men days 



Camp and 
Camp Schools 



All ranks Men days 



Mililary Dislrict A'o. S— Continued 

Toronto L'niv. ContinKcnt C.O.T.C 

1st Bn. Koyal Hamilton Regiment 

1st Bn. Dufferin Rifles of Canada 

1st Bn. Wentworth RoKt 

1st Bn. P.L. (A. & S.) Highlanders of Canada. 

1st Bn. Lincoln Regiment 

1st Bn. Haldimand Rifles 

1st Bn. Norfolk Rifles 

1st Bn. Lineiiln and Welland Regt 

Queen's (Iwn Rifles of Canada — 

Regimental Headquarters 

1st Hn. (8.-!rd Bn. C.E.F.) 

2nd Bn. (95tli Bn. t\E.F 

1st Bn. Roval (irenadiers 

1st Bn. 48tii Regt. (Highlanders) 

1st Bn. Irish Regiment 

1st Bn. Toronto Regiment 

1st Bn. Toronto Scottish Regt 

1st Bn. Grey Regt 

1st Bn. Simcoe Foresters 

The York Rangers— 

1st Bn 

2nd Bn 

1st Bn. Peel and DufTerin Regt 

1st Bn. Halton Rifles 

1st Bn. Ontario Regiment 

3rd Machine Gun Brigade 

2nd Divisional Train — 

No. 1 Company 

No. 2 Company 

No. 2 Field .\ml)ulanee • 

No. 5 Field Ambulance 

No. 7 Cav. Field Ambulance 

No. 16 Field .Vnibulance 

No. 19 Field Ambulance 

No. 2 Detai-h rnent ( ".O.C 

No. 2 Detachment C.P.C 

No. 2 Detachment C.A.D.C 



Military Dixtrict No. .'— 

Princess Louise Dragoon Guards 

3r<l Prince of Wales Can. Dragoons 

4th Hussars 

1st Brigade C.F.A. H.Q 

2nd (Ottawa) Battery 

1st BatUrv 

4th Brigade C.F.A. H.Q 

4th Battery 

2n(l Hvv. Battery (att'd) 

9th Brigade C.F.A. H.Q 

:i4th Battery 

3rd Divisional Kngineers H.Q 

3rd Field Battery 

5th Field Company 

3rd Signal Bn. C.C.S.— 

Headquarters 

No. 3 Signal Company 

No. 16 Signal C'ompany 

Queen's L^niv. Contingent C.O.T.C 

1st Bn. Princess of Wales Own Regt 

1st Bn. Argyll Light Infntry 

Ist Bn. Hastings and P. E. Regt 

1st Bn. Frontenac Regt 

1st Bn. Lanark and Renfrew Regt 

1st Bn. Brockvillc Rilles 

1st Bn. Grcnville Regt 

1st Bn. Stormont Dundas and Glengarry High- 
landers 

Ist Bn. Ottawa Highlanders 

Ist Bn. Le Regt. de Hull 

1st Bn. Northumberland (Ontario) Rgt 

1st Bn. Victoria and Haliburton Kegt 

1st Bn. Durham Regt 



266 
370 
324 
162 
366 
228 



346 
745 
258 
393 
482 



3.144 
2,890 
2,261 
1,224 
3.348 
1,811 



880 



4,666 

2,734 
6,513 
1,739 
2,069 
3,772 



1,014 
1,709 



58 



97 

18 

640 

335) 

45 
46 

479 

352 
1,746 
1,747 

385 
1,638 

777 
2,171 
1,304 

643 
1,827 
1.368 
1,851 
1,240 
1,954 



123 
118 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 



Local Training 



All ranks Men days 



Camp and 
Camp Schools 



All ranks Men days 



Mililgry Dislrirl No. 5— Conririucd 

1st I«n. Pctcrlxiro RanRiTS 

1st Hn. Governor General's Foot Gds. 
4th Machine Gun Brigade — 

No. 1 Company 

No. 2 Company 

No. 3 Company 

3rd Divisional Train C.A.S.C— 

No. 1 Company 

No. 1 Field Ambulance 

No. 23 Field .'Vmbulance 

No. 3 Detachment C.O.C 



Military District Xo. i— 

13th Scottish Light Dragoons 

17th Duke ot York's R.C. Hussars 

1st Regt. 1st Eastern Townships Mounted Rifles.. 
6th Brigade C.F.A.— 

24th (Slu-fford) Battery 

35lh Battery 

81st Battery 

79th Battery 

2nd Brigade C.F..\.— 

7th (Montreal) Battery 

5th (Westmount) Battery 

66th Battery 

27th Batterj- 

2nd Heavy Brigade — 

Headquarters 

1 St Heavy Battery 

3rd Siege Battery 

7th Siege Battery 

10th Siege Battery 

2nd Montreal Regt. C.A 

4th Divisional Engineers — 

Headquarters 

4th Fieltl Company 

4th Signal Bn. C.C.S.— 

No. 4 Signal Company 

3rd Signal Troop 

No. 4 Cyclist Co. C. of G 

McGill Univ. Contingent C.O.T.C 

Vniv. of Bishop's College Contingent C.O.T.C. . 

Loyola College Contingent C.O.T.C 

1st Bn. Sherbrooke Regt 

1st Bn. Les Carabiniers de Sherbrooke 

1st Bn. Le Regt. de Ste. Hyacinthe 

1st Bn. Le Regt. de Chateauguay 

Ist Bn. Les Carabiniers Mont-Royal 

1st Bn. Le Regt. De Joliette 

1st Bn. The Three Rivers Regt 

1st Bn. Le Regt. de Maisonneuve 

Ist Bn. Victoria Rifles of Canada 

The Royal Highlanders of Canada Regimental 

Headquarters. Ist and 2nd Bns 

1st Bn. Royal Montreal Regt ^ 



1st Bn. Canadian Grenadier Guards. 

1st Motor Machine Gun Brigade 

8th Machine Gun Brigade 

4th Divisional Train 



Military District Xo. 5 — 

7th Hussars 

1 1 th Hussars 

13th Brigade C. FA.— 

Headquarters 

57th (Quebec) Battery 

82nd Battery 

94th Battery 

6th Quebec and Levis Regt. C.GA. 



209 
267 

47 
72 
101 



151 
ISO 
305 

778 
270 
337 

168 



1,663 
2,293 

335 
372 
666 



27H 
243 



no 

437 
10 

54 

890 

351 



225 
1,183 J 

552 
1,122 
1,551J 
1.162 

916i 



3,442 



1.1815 
543 

2.378 

6,991 
2,376 
2,934 
1,340 
549 
545 



378 
'49' 



990 
911 



296 
245 
248 



416 
320 
368 



1,526 

i;oi7 

L217 



1,1.52 
1,317 



288 

407 

10 



NATIOXAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



Unit 


Ixjcal Training 


Came 
CampS 


and 
chools 




AU ranks 


Men days 


All ranks 


Men days 


Mililary DiKlrict No. ,5 — Continued 
5th Divisional Kngineera— 


38 

46 
19 
15 
88 
42 


264 

382 
137 
116 
672 
504 














5th Sicnal Hn. ( •.(■.. S.— 










N'o. 5 Cyclist Co. C. of Guides , , , . 










LaSulle ContiiiKint C.O.T.C 








66 
6S 
43 
79 


536 


1st Hn. T.c Uc't'i lie Hrauce 






563 








503 


Ist I3n. T,c Rent, de Levis 






652 




277 
177 


2.406 
1,562 












75 
58 


626 








468 


5th Divisional Train C.A.S.C. No. 2 Company.. . 

No. 5 Detachment C.A.V.C 

No. 5 Detachment C.P.C . 


35 


315 




8 
2 

103 
86 

35 
38 

2 
36 
38 
81 
38 
219 

4 

123 
2 


79 
19 


Mililary District A'o. 6— 

P. K. I. Light Horse 






1,218 








1,135 


14th Brigade C.F.A.— 


1 
35 
34 

2 
37 
39 


70 
68 

4 

74 
78 


42 




350 


STth Battery 


476 


16th Brigade C.l'.A.— 


^■) 


0th Sydnev Battery 


376 


3t>th Buttery 


418 




648 


SOth 15iitterv 


38 


70J 


418 


1st r. K.I. Heavy Brigade 


1,423 


1st Halifax KeKt . C.G.A 


180 
50 


1.325 J 
452) 


14 
48 


tith Signal Bn. CCS.— 


926 




14 


1675 






2 


1st Bn. Halilax Killes 


192 
155 


1.015S 
1,212J 




Ist Bn. P. L. Fusiliers 






13 
473 
75 
286 
79 
80 
83 

83 
128 

m 

38 
38 

2 
52 
52 
53 
59 


181 








4,547 


1st Bn. Cumberland Regt 






941 








2,758 








1,009 








990 


1st Bn. Colchester and Hunts Regt 






982 


Nova Scotia Technical CoUeee Contingent 
CO.T C 


35 
34 


414 

246 






649 


No. 6 Detachment CTP.C 




Military District No. 7— 

8th P. L. N. B. Hussara 




• 


1,057 








900 


12th Brigade C.K.A.— 


3 

36 
38 


6 
72 
76 


20 


8th Battery 


380 


90th (Newcastle) Battery 


380 


3rd N. B. Heavy Brigade- 


24 


loth Heavv Battery 


5« 
52 
54 


112 
104 
108 


520 




520 




530 




531 


6th Signal Bn. CCS.— 

No. b Signal Company 


18 


134 





NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 



Unit 


Local Training 


Camp and 
Camps Schools 


All ranks 


Men days 


All ranks 


Men days 


Military Dislrict No. 7— Continued 






18 


162 


New Brunswick Univ.'ContinKent C.6.T.C 

Mount Allison Univ. Contingent C.O.T.C 


53 
80 


422 
570 








3 
114 

123 
117 
103 


29 








953 


1st I'.n York I{oKt 






957 


1st Hn North Sliorc (X B ) Regt 






950 


1st Bn. New Brunswick Rangers 


175 


1,475 


844 


Bth Divisionnl Train C_\.S.C.— 


32 

9 

214 

7 
156 
1.54 
128 
131 

3 
37 
36 
38 


320 








81 


1st Bn St John Fusiliers 






1,348 


Mitilary Dislricl So. 10— 






66 








1.150 








1.093 


The Border Horse 

1st Regt. Manitoba Mounted Rifles . 
5th Brigade f. FA.— 

Head<^uarters 

13th \\ innipeg Battcrj-. 

38th Battery 

17th Batten,- 


37 
28 
38 
38 
102 
184 
1 
327 
178 
252 
172 
202 
134 
297 
78 
120 
202 


74' 

48} 

66 

201 

883 

1,512 

9 

1,251J 

1,427 

1,252} 

1,400 

1,190 

884 

1,612 

561 

475} 

1,058} 


1,018 
1,095 

383 
288 
294 


lOth Signal Bn. CCS 


66 


485 






20th Infantry Brigade Headquarters. 

1st Bn. Winnipeg Rifles 


























































10th Mu< hine Gun Brigade 


22 

5 

1 

161 
113 

1 
38 
38 
28 
42 

4 

31 
32 
38 


320 




44 

37 


301 
183 


45 


No. 4 Field Ambulance 




No. 10 .-HMtion C A V C 


12 


Military Di.ilr\rt .Vii. //— 

5th British Columbia Light Horse 






1,481 


lat Rcgt. B.C. Mounted Rifles 






1,084 


15th Brigade CF.A.— 


3 

38 
38 
36 
55 

18 
40 
40 
37 
26 

3 
74 

20 
13 

341 
171 

51 
175 
173 
225 

83 
139 


6 
76 
76 
72 

.ic 

116J 
331 
331 
74 
188 

27 
*.:• 515 

* 16S 
117 
18 

2.914 
1.372 

4.59 
1.S47 
1.349 
1.738} 

689 
1,191 


14 


31st Battery 

68th Battery 


380 
380 


85th Batter>- .i 


280 


5th Siege Battery (att'd) 


420 


5th B. C Regt. C.GJl.— 

Headquarters 

No. 1 Company 

No. 2 Company 

58th Battery C.F..\. (att'd) 


16 
132 
172 
380 


12th Siege Battery (atfd). . . . 




11th Divisional Knginccrs — 

Headquarters 

6th Field Company . . 

11th Signal Bn.C.C.S.— 










23rd Intantrj- Brigade Headquarters 

1st B. C. Regt. Duke of Connaughfs Own 

1st Battalion 




2nd Battalion 






3rd Battalion 






1st Bn. Seaforth Highlanders of C 






1st Bn. Irish Fusiliers of Canada 






1st Bn. Rocky Mountain Rangers .. 






I3t Bn. North B.C. Regt 






1st Bn. Canadian .Scottish Rcgt 







17-2 



18 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



Unit 


Local Training 


Camp and 
Camp. Schools 


All ranks 


Men days 


A 1 ranks 


Men days 


Mililary District No. 11— Continued 


154 

53 
21 
6 

1 


1,288 

4I2J 
151 
42 

27 






nth Divisional Train C.A.S.C. 


153 
132 
159 
129 




No. 18 Field Ambulance . 




No. 11 Detachment C.O.C 

Mililary District X<>. IS— 


1,253 




1,089 








1,154 




2 

21 
30 

34 
20 
17 
141 
19 
70 

76 
166 


7 

175 
279 

68 
40 
149 
l.llKi 
144 
842 

694 
1,464 


1.052 


10th HriKadeC.F.A.— 




77th Batterj' 






17th IJriKadc CFA.— 

21.st Hattery 


34 

38 


330 
352 


14th Field Company C.E 




12th Sicnal Bn. CCS . . . 






No. 12 fyclist Co. C of G 




Saskatchewan I'niv. Contingent C.O.T.C 

South Saskatchewan 3Elegt. — 

1st Battalion 




2nd " 






3rd " 


98 
93 
126 


883 j 


4th " .... 






832 


5th " 






936 


North Saskatchewan Regt.— 


138 
148 


1.229 
1,29IJ 




2nd " 






3rd " . 


55 


476 


4th 


58 
116 
40 

112 


298 
869{ 
360 

112 










No. 10 Field .\mbulance 






Mtlilary District Xr>. IS— 

loth Canadian Light Horse 

19th Alberta Dragoons . 


138 
118 

20 
43 

26 


1.103 
1,069 


Alberta Mounted Rifle*— 


288 








688 


19th Brigade C.F.A... 
22nd Battery.. 


26 
33 
29 


52 
207 
58 


208 


2.3rd Battery 




91st Battery 


29 

2 
38 
33 
37 


232 


20th Brigade C.F.A.— 


20 


61.st Batter\- 


38 
33 
37 
13 
21 

32 


76 
66 
74 
82 
116 

203j 


304 


7Sth Battery 


264 


92nd Battery 


296 


4th Field Troop C.E 

13th Field Company 




18 

7 


51 


13th Signal Bn. CCS.— 




No. 7 Signal Troop 


83 


Alberta Univ. Contingent C. O.T.C 

29th Infantr\- Brigade— 


204 


2,407 




3 

138 
145 


. 


The Kdmonion Regiment— 

1st Battalion 






1.008 


2nd •• 






1.187 


24th Infantry Brigade— 


2 

185 
108 

79 


IS 

1,095 
946 

685 




Calgar>- Regiment- 

1st Battalion 


1 


2 


2nd 




Alberta Regiment — 

1st Battalion 


28 
29 


448 


2nd •' 


464 




81 


578 




13th Divisional Train C.A.S.C—. 


6 


96 


No. S Field .Vmbulance 


31 
15 


156i 
101) 










Artillery Camp School Sarcec 


163 


672 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 19 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

SCHOOLS OF INSTRUCTION 

Remarks. — Instructional work had to be considerably restricted again 
this year owing to the financial situation. 

Permanent Force.— The attendance of candidates at courses in England 
for the higher militant- education of officers and N.C.Os. of the Permanent 
Force was necessarily kept do%\Ti to the minimum. A number of applications 
for candidates to proceed to England for instructional courses had to be 
refused on grounds of economy. 

Wliile it is essential that the full number of technically trained Permanent 
Force personnel should be maintained, this w;\s not possible under the economic 
conditions which prevailed. 

Non-Permanent Acti-ie Militia. — It is gratifying t'o note that the number 
of personnel of the N.P.A.M. attending courses at Royal and Permanent 
Schools has increased to double that of 1922. 

Owing, however, to the reduced strength of the Permanent Force, there 
was an insufficient ninnber of instructors and trained personnel for demon- 
stration purposes; consequently, at many schools, full value could not be given 
to the members of the Non-Permanent Active MiUtia attending for instruc- 
tion. It is greatly to the credit of all ranks engaged on tliis instructional work 
that with the limited facilities available they were able to accomplish as much 
as they did. 

Courses for both Permanent and Non-Permanent Active ^lilitia were held 
and attended by personnel as shown below: — 

COVRSES IX ENGL.\XD 

Permanent Force. — 

Staff College, Camberley 

Major (BH. Lt.-Col.) W. G. Beeman, DSO., R.C.A., Januar\', 1922, to 
December, 1923. 

Capt. (B\'t. Lt.-Col.) R. J. Brook, CBE., DSO., R.C.R., January, 1922, 
to December, 1923. 

Major fB\-t. Lt.-Col.) H. D. G. Crerar, DSO., R.C.A., January 1923, to 
December, 1924. 

Major G. P. Vanier, DSO., MC, Royal 22nd Regt., January, 1923, to 
December, 1924. 

Lt.-Colonel E. W. Sansom, DSO., C.S.A.S., January-, 1924, to December, 
1925. 

Capt. (Bvt. Major) M. A. Pope, MC, R.C.E., Januarv, 1924, to December, 
1925. 

Staff College, Quetta 

Captain J. K. Lawson, The R.C.R., Februarj', 1924, to December, 1925. 

Attachments and Senior Officers School 

Major (Bt. Lt.-Col.) W. H. Bell, DSO., The R.C.D., Februar^^ 1924, 
to August, 1924. 

Major C. E. Connollv, DSO., L.S.H. (R.C.), Fcbruarv, 1924, to August., 1924. 
Major E. A. S. Smith, The R.C.R., Februar>-, 1924, to August, 1924. 

Ordnance Officers Course 

Lieut. (T. Capt.) V. A. Curmi, R.C.O.C, February', 1924, to January, 
1925. 

17— 2i 



20 .V.4r/O.V.4L DEFEXCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1325 

Gurmery Staff Course 

Captain C. C. Shaw, R.C.A., October, 1922, to Julv, 1924. 
Captain R. L. Fortt, R.C.A., October, 1922, to July, 1924. 
Lieut. (Bvt. Capt.) R. 0. G. Morton, R.C.H.A., September, 1923, to 
June, 1924. 

Master Gunners Course 

No. 8008 QMSI. S. G. Williams, R.C.H.A., April, 1923, to March, 1924. 
No. 4011 Sergt. D. McCarthy, R.C.G.A., April, 1923, to March, 1924. 

Small Arms Course 

Major A. K. Hamming. The R.C.R., March, 1923. to November, 1923. 
Captain K. C. Burners, MC, P.P.C.L.I., March, 1923, to November, 1923. 

Physical Training Course 

Captain F. M. W. Harvev, VC, MC, L.S.H. (RC), April, 1922, to July, 
1923. 

School of Military Engineering 

Captain J. E. Lyon, R.C.E., September, 1922, July, 1924. 

Armament Artificers Course 
No. 34756 S/Sergt. H. W. Thomas, R.C.O.C, April, 1923, to March, 1924. 

School of Mil. Administrat:ion 

Lieut. (Bvt. Capt.) J. E. H. TidswcU, R.C.A.S.C, September, 1923, to 
January, 1924. 

Laboratory Foreman's Course 

No. 34606 Pte. W. S. McFarlane, R.C.O.C, September, 1923, to Januar\-, 
1924. 

Special — To Visit Armourers' Establxshments 

Major R. B. Whyte, R.C.O.C. July, 1923, to October. 1923. 

Non-Permanent Active Militia — 

Special Signalling Courses 
P/ Major F. H. M. Jones, MC. 6th Signal Bn.. April. 1923. to August, 1923. 

COURSES IN C.\N.\D.\ 

Staff College Preparatory Course 

The third post-war course for officers preparing for the examination for 
admission to the Staff College was held from October 1, 1923, to February 26. 
1924, at the Royal Military College, Kingston. This course was attended 
by five officers of the Permanent Active Militia, all of whom competed at the 
examination for admission to the Staff College for the two vacancies allotted 
to Canada. 

Refresher Course, R.M.C. 

In conjunction with the above, a Refresher Course was held for officers of 
the Permanent Active Militia from October 1 to the end of December, and 
was attended bv eleven officers. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 21 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

Artillery Staff Course 

The second post-war Artillery Staff Course commenced during the last 
financial year (Januan*', 19231 , and continued for the following nine months. 
Four officers and five N.C.Os. qualified at this course. 

School of Military Engineering. Halifax 

Searchlight Operators, Foreman of Works and Field Engineering Courses 
were hekl for personnel of the R.C.E. A total of one officer and nine other 
ranks attended during the year. 

Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps, Ottawa 

Courses of Instruction were held at Ottawa for personnel of the R.C.O.C. 
A total of 42 otlier ranks attended dui'ing the year. 

Signal and Small Arms Courses 
See under " Signal Service " and " Small Arms Training " respectively. 

Militia Staff Course 

The Militia Staff Course Syllabus is drawn up so as to enable officers of the 
Non-Permanent Active Militia to fit themselves for employment on the staff of 
formations in the field. 

The tlieoretical portion of the first post-war course was carried out in 
1922. The practical portion of this course (of twelve daj's' duration) was 
carried out during the summer of 1923 at St. John's, P.Q., for candidates from 
Eastern Canada, and at Sarcee Camp, Alberta, for candidates from Western 
Canada. Forty-five candidates attended, all of whom obtained " m.s.c." cer- 
tificates. 

The theoretical portion of the second post-war course was held in the 
several districts during the winter months, and again proved very popular. 
One hundred and seventy-four officers attended the lectures in this portion, 
while many others attended unofficially from time to time as opportunity 
offered. 



22 NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Qualifying and Special Courses 

Qualifying and Special Courses for Non-Permanent Active Militia were held 
at Royal and Permanent Schools of Instruction as follows: — 



Number attendinK 



Royal School of Cavalry. Toronto 

St. Jean 

" " Winnipeg 

" " Calgary 

Royal Sch. of Artillcrj-, Kingston > 

Halifax 

'* " Winnipeg 

" " Esquimau 

Royal School of Infantrj'. London 

Toronto 

Montreal 

Quebec 

" " Halifax 

" St. John 

" " Winnipeg 

" " Esquimau 

R. School of Machine Guns, Toronto 

" Winnipeg.... 

R.C.A.S.C. School of Instr'n. Toronto. .. 
" " Winnipeg . 

Esquimau 



Oct. 8 
Jan. 14 

Oct. 8 
Jan. 14 
Feb. 25 

Oct. 8 
Jan. 14 

Nov. 5 
Jan. 7 

Nov. 5 
Dec. 10 

Nov. 5 
Jan. 7 

Nov. 19 
Jan. 21 
Jan. 21 

Oct. 22 
Jan 14 

Feb. 18 
Feb. 18 

Oct. 8 
Jan. 14 



Oct. 
Jan. 



Oct. 8 
Jan. 14 
Feb. 25 

Oct. 8 
Jan 14 

Jan. 1 
Mar. 3 

Nov. 26 
Feb. 25 



Oct. 
Jan. 



May 2S 



Nov. 12 
Feb. 18 

Nov. 12 
Feb. 25 
Mar. 24 

Nov. 12 
Feb. 25 

Dec. 10 
Feb. 11 

Mar. 31 
Mar. 17 

Dec. 10 
Feb. 11 

Dec. .31 
Jan. 28 
Feb. 21 

Nov. 28 
Feb. 18 

Feb 29 
Mar. 24 

Nov. 12 
Feb. 18 

Feb. 18 

Nov. 12 
Feb. 18 



Nov. 12 
Feb. 18 
Mar. 31 

Nov. 12 
Feb. 18 

Jan. 31 
Mar. 24 

Dec. 17 
Mar. 24 

Feb. 23 

Dec. 11 
Mar. 11 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 23 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

In addit'ion to the above the number of Provisional Schools conducted for 
the various Arms were: — 



Number 

of 
Schools 



Number attending 



Other 
Ranks 



Cavalry . 



Artillery. 



Engineers . 

Infantry. . 



1 


Machine Guns 


2 






* 


3 








4 






' 


5 








lU 








11 








12 
13 









Can. Army Ser\'icc Corps 



Cadet Services. 



Can. Army Medical Corps 



1 


119 


.I 


56 


5 


55 


2 


U 


3 


21 


.■) 


34 


2 


27 





50 


3 


33 


2 


12 


1 


12 


3 


6 



82 
197 

98 
133 



56 
22 
130 
51 



The number of officers and N.C.O's who obtained certificates at the above 
schools is shown in statements appearing on pages 26 to 29. 



Staff Touts, War Games, Etc. 

Staff Tours, War Games, and Tactical Exercises were carried out at vari- 
ous times and places under arrangements made by the District' Officers Com- 
manding. These exercises were well attended and produced good results. 



24 NATIOXAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
EXAMINATIONS 

Promotion Examination Permanent Active Militia. — A total of 29 presented 
themselves at the written examinations held in April, and October. Of this 
number five qualified in one or more subjects for the rank of Major, and 18 
for the rank of Captain. 

Foreign Languages. — Interpretership examinations in French were held 
under the regulations of the British Ci-vil Ser^ace Commissioners at certain 
centres in Canada in June, 1923, and January-, 1924, at which oflBcers qualified 
as follo\vs: first-class interpreter, 2; second-class interpreter, 7. 

Canadian Officers Training Corps. — In addition to the annual training of 
C.O.T.C. Contingents as shown under " Training " above, there was a satis- 
factory attendance of Cadets at the half yearly examinations for Certificates 
" A " and " B " as shown in the summary of results given on page 25. 

The former certificate qualifies a candidate for a commission in the 
Non-Permanent Active Militia, and the latter is equivalent to a certificate for 
the rank of Captain. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 



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E..,quiinull, IJ.C 

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Quclicc, P.Q 

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30 NATIOXAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

ARTILLERY 

ArmaTnent 

The two Q.F. 6-inch guns and mountings received from the Department 
of Naval Service last year have been mounted in replacement of two obsolete 
B.L. 6-inch disappearing guns. An additional two Q.F. 6-inch guns and 
mountings have been secured from the Naval Service, and it is proposed to 
mount these also in replacement of obsolete equipment so soon as funds cover- 
ing the small expenditure involved are available. 

The sen-iceability of armaments has been maintained in so far as avail- 
able funds permitted. The Reserves of Coast and Mobile Artillen,- ammunition 
are much below the minimum required for the several natures of guns. 

Artillery Training, 1923-24 

The early resumption of Mounted Training for Light and Medium Artillery 
units is most necessary. The present system of only training small detach- 
ments from each unit which has been found necessary owing to the financial 
situation cannot be continued much longer without serious effect on the efficiency 
of the artillery of the Canadian Militia. 

Royal Schools of Artillery 

Courses of instruction were held at all schools during the late autumn 
of 1922 and winter of 1923 with satisfactory' results. The number availing 
themselves of the instruction and qualification offered is still below the normal 
requirements of Non-Permanent Artillery. 

The total attendance of N.P. Artillen.- was 53 officers and 100 N.C.Os. 

There has been a tendency to ask for Provisional Schools of Artillery 
and, in some cases, it has been found necessary- to grant such request*. These 
schools can only qualify candidates in theoretical subjects and are in any case, 
unsatisfacton,' as the attendance is irregular and it is impracticable to pro\'ide 
at the local centres the equipment and apparatus necessarj' for a proper gun- 
nerj' course. Pro\nsional Schools are, therefore, onlj' authorized under excep- 
tional conditions. 

The instructional capacity of the Permanent Force Artillerj'' was raised 
considerably by the successful qualification of four officers and five N.C.Os. on 
the Artillery Staff Course. The usual attention was paid to special and short 
courses for the purpose of qualifying personnel for promotion in the junior ranks 
of the P.F. Artillery. 

SIGNAL SERVICE 

The work of the year under report has resulted in a general advancement 
of the organization and training of Signallers both in the Permanent and Non- 
Permanent Active Militia and Cadets. 

The Royal Canadian CoiT)S of Signals 

The limited establishment of the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals is not 
sufficient at present to enable the Unit to supply the Administrative and Train- 
ing Staffs for the Militia and the special Communication Serx-ices that are now 
being carried out by the Department of National Defence for other depart- 
ments and branches of the Dominion Government. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (.MILITIA SERVICE) 31 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

The Northwest Territories and Yukon Radio System and the Radio 
Sen'ice for the Royal Canadian Air Force is being conducted without a suffi- 
cient margin of safely as regards staff and personnel training, engineering, 
supenision, etc. 

Tlio Instnictional Cadre. — Signals liave be*n fully occupied during the 
year at Pro\'isional and Royal Schools of Signalling, Summer Camps of Instruc- 
tion and the supervision of Signal training with otlier Permanent and Non- 
Permanent Active Militia Units and Cadet Corps. 

During the year 1923-24, a total of 66 Pro^^sionaI Schools of Visual Tele- 
graphy and eight Schools of Line Telegraphy, together with 72 Cadet Classes 
in Signalling, have been conducted. 

The comparison with the number of schools held in preceding years, is 
given below: — 



- 


V/T. 


L/T. 


Cadets 


Total 


Year 1921 22 


47 
49 
66 


1 
6 
S 


44 
53 
72 


92 


Year 1922-23 


108 


Year 1923-24 


146 







The number of certificates granted, as compared to previous years, is as 
under: — 



- ■ 


1921 


1922 


1923 


Visual Telegraphy — 

OfTict-rs Grade "A" 


48 
21 
134 
284 


55 

8 

219 

174 

60 


57 


Offieer-s Grade "B" 


8 


Other Ranks "X" 


233 


Other Ranks "B" 


183 




57 








Totals 


487 


516 


538 






Line Teleoraphy — 

Officers Grade "A" 


4 

1 
1 
6 


18 

1 

21 

21 


13 


Officers Grade "B" 


1 


Other Ranks "A" 


42 


Other Ranks "B" 


25 






Totals 


12 


61 


81 







While these figures exhibit steady progress and the training staff available 
has been fully employed, it' must be emphasized that the number of certificates 
issued still falls far short of the requirements of the Canadian Militia. 
Increased facilities for signal training are most urgently required. 



Royal Canadian Schools of Signalling 

Qualifying Courses in Visual Telegraphy for selected candidates of the 
Permanent and Non-Permanent Active Militia were held at Camp Borden and 
Winnipeg during the summer of 1923. 

Thirteen officers were successful in qualifying as Inst'ructors, and 26 
N.C.Os. obtained their qualifications as Assistant Instructors in Visual Tele- 
graphy. 



32 NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Cadet Signalling Classes 

The majority of the 72 Cadet Classes conducted during the year were held 
concurrently with Provisional Schools of Signalling conducted for the Non- 
Permanent Active Militia. The ninnber of classes held, as also the totals of 
Cadets successful in obtaining certificates, show an appreciable increase over 
previous years. 



- 


1921 


1922 


1923 


Cadet Certificates Granted — 


100 


1,186 
242 
60 


1 422 




240 




67 








Totals 


1,093 


1,488 


1,736 







Radio Activities— The R.C.C.S. 

R.C.A.F. — The radio work which this department began for the Royal 
Canadian Air Force during 1921 has been successfully continued during the 
past year. 

The three Ground Stations in Manitoba were reopened in May, 1923, and 
were operated continuously until the end of October. Stations were located at 
Winnipeg and at Norway House and Victoria Beach on lake Winnipeg. These 
Stations are operated by the R.C.A.F. in connection with forestrj' patrols for 
the Manitoba Government and it is intended to equip the seaplanes in use in 
Manitoba with radiotelephone apparatus during the coming season, so that 
the patrol system in operation in Alberta can be carried on in Manitoba. 

The radiotelephone work with aircraft at High River, Alberta, was con- 
tinued during tlie summer with verj- satisfactory' results. There was no change 
in equipment or planes; and as was the case during the season 1922, only one- 
way communication was attempted. 

An average range of 150 miles for good commercial speech between the 
patrol planes and the Ground Station was maintained. 

The main purjKiso of the Air Station at High River, Alberta, is the patrol 
of the Bow and Crow Forest Resen'es on the eastern slopes of the Rocky 
Mountains for the detection of forest fires in these areas and the installation of 
radiotclcphony has proved of incalculable value in the immediate reporting and 
quick suppression of numerous outbreaks. 

Communication between High River Alberta and the Manitoba Radio 
System was again maintained this year, tiie distance being approximately 790 
miles. 

An additional Station is now under construction for the R.C.A.F. and is 
to be installed at the Air Station, .lericho Beach, Vancouver. Tiiis station is 
designed to operate with the R.C.A.F. forestry- and fisheries patrols for the 
British Columbia Government. 

Ottawa Radio Station 

The Ottawa Station was moved during the year from RocklifTe to a new 
location, selected to avoid certain interference from the street car system. The 
design of this station is identical with those built for other Government depart- 
ments and is utilized for radio communication between Ottawa and Camp 
Borden for tlie R.C.A.F. and for experimental and test work on radio apparatus 
designed and built in the Signals Inspection and Test Department. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 33 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

Radio Work for Department of the Interior 

A radiotelegraph system, extending from Edmonton up the Mackenzie 
river and across the Yukon, has been begun for the Department of the Interior. 

Tlie complete system, as at present projected, includes stations at Dawson 
City and Mayo in the Yukon, and at Herschcl Island, Fort Simpson and Fort 
Smith in the Mackenzie Basin, with a southern terminal located at Edmonton. 

The main steps in this system are approximately 600 miles each, and as 
military equipment capable of covering such distances commercially was not 
available in Canada, it became necessary to design and build special apparatus. 

On account of tlie isolated nature of most of the stations on this system, 
it was essential that they should be made self-contained in every way, from 
the source of power out. In selecting the various elements comprising the 
station equipment, an effort was made to use equipment manufactured on this 
continent, in order to facilitate the supply of spare parts. 

The construction of the necessary equipment was undertaken by the Radio 
Engineers of the R.C.C.S., and the first complete high-powered set was turned 
out in the signals workshop in July of last year. 

As funds had not been made available sufficiently early, it was impossible 
to complete the construction and installation of the entire system in one season. 
After consultation with the Department of the Interior it was decided to con- 
centrate attention on the Dawson-Mayo link; the reason for this was to avoid 
the necessity of building 165 miles of telegraph line into the new mining dis- 
trict of Mayo. 

This was the shortest step in the chain and in order to complete the work 
before freeze-up, a 120-'\Vatt Portable Military Set was sent to Mayo, and 
the one standard station available installed in Dawson City. The set in Mayo 
will be replaced by standard equipment this summer. 

A party of two officers and six men of the R.C.C.S. were sent from Ottawa 
to install these two stations. The work was completed and the first part of the 
system put into operation in October, 1923. Since that date these two stations 
have been in continuous communication and satisfactory results have been 
obtained. 

At present the amount of trafiRc is not hea\^ but it is all remunerative, and 
with the installation of the new stations connecting up with the Canadian 
National Telegraphs at Edmonton a great increase in traffic may be looked for. 
In addition to serving the needs of the Government and commercial interests 
in t!ie Yukon and Mackenzie Basin, the system will also be of great value to 
fur trading and development work in those districts, and it will also assist police 
supervision and render regular Meteorological Reports to the Dominion 
Meteorological Service from a part of the world which up to date has been 
closed to Meteorological investigation. 

Signals Inspection and Test Department 

This department has been working at full capacity throughout the year on 
the design and construction of the " Standard Set," for installation in all Radio 
Stations in operation, or projected, by the Department of National Defence. 
To date eight complete Stations have been manufactured and the numerous 
components in masts, aerial gear, and power plants assembled. Experimental 
and Research Work has been carried out during the year and two special port- 
able radio sets have been designed and built in the workshops, one for the 
Director of Surveys, Department of the Interior, the other for the Dominion 
Forestry Inspector of ^lanitoba. In each case the instruments gave perfect 
satisfaction in the work for which they were especially designed. 

17—3 



34 NATIOXAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

A considerable amount of wireless and telephone equipment has been over- 
hauled, repaired and tested for the R.C.A.F. and Xon-Permanent Active 
Militia. 

The Signal Depot 

The R.C.C.S., located at Camp Borden, has been engaged throughout the 
year on the training of recruits and in carrying out successive courses in visual, 
line and wireless telegraphy for the training of personnel either for employment 
as wireless operators and electricians on Department of National Defence Radio 
Stations or for duty as Assistant Instructors in signal work. 

SMALL ARMS TRAINING 

During the period under review training in the rifle, bayonet, light auto- 
matics (Lewis and Hotchkiss^, Vickcrs machine gun and revolver, were carried 
out in both the Permanent and Non-Permanent Active Militia. In addition to 
general training the following annual courses were fired: — 

Permanent Active Militia 

The annual weapon training courses were practically identical with those 
fired in the British Army, bemg slightly modified to suit our conditions. 

With the rifle recruits of Cavalry, Engineers and Infantry fired the com- 
plete course. Recruits of other units fired a modified course. Trained soldiers 
of Cavalry and Infantry fired the classification practices, and those of other 
units a shorter course more suitable to their requirements. 

Hotchkiss and Lewis Light Automatic courses were fired by Cavalry and 
Infantry; all men so advanced carrying out a short course and three men per 
gun firing the complete course. 

Tlic IMachine Gun Companies of Infantry units fired the course laid down 
for the Regular Army. 

All ranks armed with the revolver fired the courses laid down for the 
various branches of the service. 

The results obtained in the foregoing courses showed a marked improve- 
ment over those of the previous year, and compared very favourably with the 
standard attained in the British Army. 

Non-Permanent Active Militia 

The programme of weapon training was published in " Memorandum for 
Camps of Instruction, Part I, 1923," the various courses being based on those 
laid down for the British Territorial Army and modified to suit our conditions. 
Interest in this branch of training was greater than in the previous year and 
the results obtained were satisfactory. 

Cambridge Challenge Bowl 

During the year 1923, the Cambridge Challenge Bowl was competed for 
by the various units of the Permanent Active Militia and was won by No. 3 
Battery, R.C.A. (M.A.), Kingston, Ont., with an average score of 148 7 points. 

This trophy, which was donated by the officers of His Majesty's Ilegular 
Army on leaving Canada, is awarded to the Squadron of Cawalry or Battery 
or Company of Artillery, or Company of Engineers, Infantry or Signal Corps, 
Pay Corps^ Army Service Corps, Corps of Military Staff Clerks, or Head- 
quarters of unitsor detachments of the foregoing having a strength of 40 all 
ranks or over, obtaining the highest average in certain of the practices of the 
annual rifle course. 



NATIOXAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 35 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

No squtulron, battery, company or detachnicnt is eligible for the award 
unless at least 80 per cent of the actual strength, as shown by the parade states 
on the days of firing for the trophy, has taken part in the practises. 

Best Shot Badges 

Best Shot badges for the year 1923 were awarded to the best shot in the 
Royal Military College and in each squadron, battery or company of Cavalry, 
Artillery, Engineers (including field troop attached I, Corps of Signals, Corps 
of (iuides, Canadian Officers' Training Corps, Infantry, Alachine Gun Corps 
and Army Service Corps of the Non-Permanent Active Militia. 

The badge, which is worn on the left fore-arm, is awarded to the non- 
commissioned officer or man obtaining the highest score in the classification 
practices of the annual rifle course. 

The names of winners of these badges were published in Militia Orders. 

Rifle Associations 

On March 31, 1924, there were in existence 154 Military Rifle Associations 
with a total membership of 25,382, and 112 Civilian Rifle Associations with a 
total membership of 6.898. 

Dominion of Canada prizes, which consist of silver salvers mounted with 
the Canadian Coat of Arms, and engraved with the name of the winner and 
association, were competed for in 17 Civilian Rifle Associations; the names of 
tiie winners being published in Militia Orders. 

To be eligible for this prize, the association must hold four competitions 
during the season, in each of which at least 40 per cent of the members must 
take part. Competitors must be duly enrolled members of the association they 
represent as shown bj- the service roll. 

The competition is fired at 200, 300, 500 and 600 yards, five shots at each 
range, service targets being used. 

The Dominion of Canada Rifle Association and all the Provincial Rifle 
Associations held annutil prize meetings during the period under review. 

Courses of the Canadian Small Arins School 

Annual courses of the Canadian Small Arms School were held during the 
summer of 1923. 

In addition to the courses at the main school, a branch school was estab- 
lished at Camp Hughes, Manitoba, to accommodate candidates from the 
Western Military Districts. 

In July, 1923, the main school was transferred from Rockcliffe Rifle Range 
to Connaught Rifle Ronge. The new range, which is 14 miles from Ottawa, 
covers an area of 2,800 acres and is modern in all respects. 



l--3i 



36 NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
The results of the courses were as follows: — 

COURSE NO. 5 (C.A3IP HUGHES) 

Attendance — 

Officers 22 

W.O's. and N.C.O'a 4 

Results — 

Passed Failed 

Officers 21 1 

W.O's. and N.C.O's 4 Nil 

COURSE No. 6 (CAMP HUGHES) 
Attendance — 

Officers 6 

W.O's. and N.C.O's 17 

Results — 

Passed Failed 

Officers 6 Nil 

W.O's. and N.C.O's 15 2 

COURSE No. 7 (OTTAWA) 
Attendance — 

Officers 55 

W.O's. and N.C.O's 13 

Results — 

Passed Failed 

Officers 55 Nil 

W.O's. and N.C.O'a 11 2 

COURSE No. S (OTTAWA) 
Attendance — 

Officers 3 

W.O's. and N.C.O's 6 

Results — 

Passed Failed 

Officers 3 Nil 

W.O's. and N.C.O's 6 NU 

COURSE No. 9 (OTTAWA) 
Attendance — 

Officers 6 

W.O's and N.C.O's 25 

Results — 

Passed Failed 

Officers ■ 6 Nil 

W.O's. and N.C.O's 24 1 

COURSE No. 10 (OTTAWA) 
Attendance — 

Officers 2 

W.O's. and N.C.O's 10 

Results — 

Passed Failed 

Officers 2 Nil 

W.O's. and N.C.O's 4 6 



(4) Cadet Services 

A reduction of S100,000, in the cadet vote for 1922-23, and the consequent 
cancellation of camps, was followed in many centres by a loss of interest and 
shrinkage in numbers. Against this, however, sixty-five new Units were organ- 
ized during the present year, bringing the total number of enrolled cadets to 
110,120. 

The changes in the syllabus of training referred to in last year's report 
have proved beneficial, and reports from all Provinces indicate an improve- 
ment in the carriage and bearing of the cadets as a result of the concentration 
of attention on physical exercises. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 37 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

In order tliat all srhool teacliers should bo qualified to instruct in these 
exercises classes in physical training were held at Normal Schools throughout 
the country', with 12,184 student teachers in attendance, of whom 5,876 com- 
pleted courses and received certificates of qualification. 

One thousand and forty-four graduate teachers attended refresher courses 
with beneficial results. 

Four hundred and eleven male teachers obtained Cadet Instructor's Cer- 
tificates, and 36, certificates of qualification at the Small Arms School. 

The number of cadets instructed in signalling again shows an increase. 
Seventy-two classes were held at which 1,422 first year, 240 second year and 
67 third year certificates were granted. 

Due to the introduction of the new •22-inch rifles, target practice received 
a great impetus. In all competitions the entries were in excess of the numbers 
received in any previous year. 

For the Imperial Challenge Shield Competitions — miniature rifle shooting 
for boys of the Empire — 2,578 teams entered, 241 being from Canada of whom 
134 returned scores. 

The report of the National Rifle Association in regard to Canada's part) 
in the competitions reads as follows: " Very considerable progress in marks- 
manship is made by the Canadian boys, practically one team in every four 
which fired has succeeded in getting into the prize list; this is an improvement 
of 100 per cent on their performance last year and reflects great credit upon 
the instructors of the competing units. 

"Canada wins the first three places in the Senior Competition, the Calgary 
Boy Scouts standing at the head with the fine average score of 97-6 points. 

"The Canadian results as regards numbers (134 teams firing) continue, 
however, to be well below the standard of the other Dominions, notably of 
South Africa (609 teams firing) and New Zealand (574 teams firing.) It is 
sincerely hoped that Canada will soon put for\vard her great strength and will 
have well over 1,000 teams in the field." 

Peterborough Collegiate Institute Cadet Corps Von second prize and the 
Commercial Academy Cadet Corps, Quebec, third. 

As the cadets become more accustomed to the new rifles, it is confidently 
believed very marked improvement will be observed, both in the numbers 
competing and in the quality of the shooting. 

In this competition a Challenge Cup generously donated by His Excellency 
the Governor General for award to the organization showing the greatest all- 
round efficiency, was won by Trinity College School Cadet Corps, Port Hope, 
Oni;. 

The most gratifying progress was made during the year in the miniature 
rifle matches of the Dominion of Canada Rifle Association, in which 233 Cadet 
teams entered as against 70 the preceding year. The senior series was won 
by Colchester Acadcmv Cadets, Truro, N.S., and the junior series by Trinity 
College School, Port Hope, Ont. 

There was a marked improvement in the Service Rifle competitions. 
Twenty-seven teams fired for the King George Challenge Cup, which was won 
for the second time in succession by the Winnipeg Grenadiers Cadet Corps, 
with Trinity College, Port Hopx?, a close second. 

The Royal Military College Inter-Schools Competition brought out fifty- 
eight teams, Hamilton Collegiate Institute again winning the trophy, with 
Kingston Collegiate Institute in second place. 

The trophy donated by the late Earl Grey, when Governor General of 
Canada, to be awarded annually to the province having the largest number of 
cadets in proportion to school attendance, was again awarded to the province 



38 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 



15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

of Quebec, to be held for six months by Lower Canada College Cadet Corps, 
Montreal, and for six months by the Commercial Academy Cadet Corps, 
Quebec, these being the most efficient Cadet Corps in the province. 

During the school year 1913-14, 47,039 cadets were trained, of whom 
10,581 received additional instruction in camps. The appropriation for Cadet 
Services that year was $390,500, whereas in the present year, with a vote 
increased by only $60,000, it was found possible to train 110,120 cadets at 
local headquarters and permit 9,287 of the senior boys to go to camp for periods 
of from five to eight days. 

Unless cadet training, wiiich is now recei\'ing the wholehearted support 
of educationalists and meclical authorities, is to be seriously curtailed, increa.sed 
appropriations must in future be made. In this regard the action of the Gov- 
ernment of the province of Quebec in voting recently tlie sum of $5,000 for tlie 
encouragement of piiysical training in schools is noted with great satisfaction. 

A comparative statement of enrolled strength by provinces for the years 
1913-14 and 1923-24 is given below, with amounts voted for Cadet Services 
in each of these vears: — 





1913-14 


1923-24 


Province 


Enrolled 
Strength 


Enrolli^d 
Strength 




14.610 
18,148 
1.675 
471 
763 
4.164 
3,778 
1,937 
1,493 


34.293 




SO. 266 




2.524 




807 




1,838 




5,079 


Alberta 


5.513 




4.500 




5.300 






Total 


47,039 


110,120 






Amount voted for Cadet Seirices 


1913-14 
$390,500 00 


1923-24 
W50.000 00 



(5) Historical Section 

Collection, Classification and Disposal of Historical Documents 

Owing to part of the clerical staff having to be transferred to work con- 
nected with Battle Honours the task of classifying, indexing and filing the 
enormous mass of document's pertaining to the Great War. containcxl in pack- 
ing cases and custody parcels, has i)ecn considerably restricted. In the course 
of the year, however, 5,700 files have been dealt with and the information made 
available for immediate reference, in addition to a considerable number of 
maps and plans. Other material which is now in custody of this Section has 
been sorted into folders, and is in course of being arranged in chronological or 
subject order so tliat the final process of abstraction may be pursued unliind- 
ered. There remains, however, a further ma.ss of papers accumulatcfl during 
the War containing much of historical value which lia.s yet to be taken over 
from the Directorate of Records and examined, classified and made ready for 
immediate reference. 

A great amount of material consisting of artillerj' documents, maps, nominal 
rolls, etc., filling t'wo large cabinets, not previously in possession of the His- 
torical Section, has also come to light and has been examined and an inventory 
made. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 39 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

With the \-\o\v of facilitating tlii' \vt)rk of writing tlic iiiston' certain officers 
liave been mo^^t liclpful by donating or loaning to the section private diaries, 
memoranda, duplicate reports, field messages, letters, sketch maps, aeroplane 
photbgraphs, ntiil statistics, etc., relating to their experiences overseas or 
which have come into their possession in various ways. These are most valu- 
al)lc. The Section is particularly indebted to Lieut. -General Sir R. E. W. 
Turner. Major (lencral Sir E. W. B. Morrison, Major Cleneral .1. H. MacBrien, 
Brigadier General A. G. L. McXaughton, Lieut. -Colonel W. Bovey and Major 
R. Nordheimer. There must, however, be many other ex-ofScers and other 
ranks of the Canadian Expeditionary Force who are in possession of similar 
official and personal material and it would be of immense sendee to the His- 
torical Section if the documents could be placed at its disposal. Where return 
is desired the Historical Section would undertake, after making copies or 
extracts, to efTect this with as little delay as j)ossible. The story of a personal 
experience may often throw light on some point which official records leave 
obscure, while it sometimes traaspires that neither originals nor copies are 
available, in the Section, of duplicates of official papers which have been retained 
in their possession by individual officers or units. 

Official History of the C.E.F. in Canada 

The preparation of skeleton histories of pre-war Non-Permanent Active 
Militia units has been undertaken and has been completed. Apart from certain 
other routine details regarding organization, reorganization, etc., the following 
information is being recorded: — 

Commanding Officers 1914-1920. 

Date imit placed on active service. 

C.E.F. units recruited. 

Contribution of men made to C.E.F. 

Locality in which unit was authorized to recruit for C.E.F. 

Other duties performetl by the unit during the Great War. 

This series will be capable of expansion to cover the period of existence of 
llie units prior to 1914. 

In connection with the work of the Battle Honours Committee the His- 
torical Section has compiled a great amount of information which has involved 
much research extending throughout the year under review. The preparation 
of a statement for each l)attalion in the field, showing the composition at the 
end of each month throughout the war in terms of reinforcements from depleted 
C.E.F. I)attaliono, has been completed, this being an e.ssential preliminary to 
determination of Battle Honours of Militia units which peq>ctuat<> C.E.F. 
battalions which were disbanded in England. The honours due to tlie militia 
units which peqoetuate the depicted C.E.F. battalions have been compiled 
primarily on the basis of the foregoing material, for the purpose of ascertain- 
ing how the proposals of the Battle Honours Committee will work out in prac- 
tice. Similarly, li.«ts of Battle Honours for all C.E.F. cavalry and infantry 
units were prcpare<l, including alternative honours in certain cases, on the basis 
of the Battle Honours Committee's scheme and on the ser%'ices of the units, 
and summaries were made and an analysis of Honours worked out. Should 
the recommendations of the committee receive final approval without material 
change there need, therefore, be no delay in publishing tiie Great War Battle 
Honours for which Active ]Militia units and former C.E.F. regiments and bat- 
talions are eligible. 

The Directorate received the thanks and appreciation of the chairman on 
behalf of the Battle Honours Committee for the great amount of work which has 
been done by the Section to enable definite recommendations to be arrived at. 



40 NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

The reports and supplementary- reports of the Committee were also drafted 
in the Historical Section, as well as the various statements annexed thereto. 

Statistics were compiled, derived from information furnished by the soldier 
on enlistment, to determine the number of militiamen who volunteered for 
ser^^ce in the Infantn.' of the First Contingent and to arrive at facts and figures 
relating to pre-war service of personnel of the original seventeen C.E.F. bat- 
talions. 

Compilation of an Historical Account of the Military Forces of Canada 
in the Great War 

Unexpected delay has occurred in the publication of the Historj' of the 
Canadian Medical Ser\-iccs in the Great War (the first' of the series of official 
volumes dealing with the History of the Canadian Forces, 1914-1920) and this 
work has not yet gone to the printers. It is understood, however, that the 
requisite authority will probably be issued verj' shortly. 

The manuscript of the monograph written by the Deputy Director of the 
Medical Services on " The Canadian Army Medical Corps with the Canadian 
Corps during the Last Hundred Days, August -November. 1918," has been 
examined with a view to checking certain details. The proofs of this work 
have also been chcckcil and eight maps compiled in the Historical Section. 

The work of transcribing the records of Canadians who served in the Royal 
Flying Corps, the Royal Naval Air Ser\ice and the Royal Air Force and the 
compilation of a " Who's Who " of Canadian Airmen in the Great War have 
been completed so far as possible on the material available in this country. A 
list of the names of some 1,300 Canadian Officers and Cadets who entered the 
Flying Services direct witliout first passing through the C.E.F. has been sent 
to England and the necessary particulars are being obtained from Royal Air 
Force Records by the Canadian Liaison Officer at the Air Ministry-. 

Further progress has been made towards the compilation of the official 
Historj' of the Canadian Forces in the Great War, but a stage has now been 
reached when it' is absolutely essential to have access to the diaries and other 
records of British, Australian, Indian and French units which sensed under 
Canadian Headquarters or on the Canadian flanks in various operations. The 
infomiation is in possession for the final stage of the War but not in respect 
to the earlier period. Without recourse to these records it is impossible to 
make correct appreciations of situations or to write a complete and accurate 
story of operations in which the Canadian Corps took part. Any history based 
on the knowledge of the operations of purely Canadian formations, only, would 
necessarily lack balance and gi\'e a very imjx^rfect record of events. More- 
over, conflicting accounts of the general trend of e\Tnt.* repeatedly occur 
and questions have arisen which cannot be answered by available documents; 
tfiese can only be adjudicated and scttleti after personal discussion with the 
writer of the British official histon,'. It is most necessan,' that a representative 
of this Section, conversant with what exactly is required, should as soon as 
possible proceed to England to obtain copies or extracts of maps, sketches, 
plans, orders, field messages, diaries, strength returns, etc., which relate to 
Canadian operations and are not available in our own records, and to consult 
with the fJcneral Officer and his staff at the Historical Section, Committee of 
Imperial Defence, who are engaged on the task of compiling -the British official 
histon,'. Arrangements to this end are now being made. 

To illustrate tiie extent to which other than Canadian units were involved 
in Canadian operations it may be mentioned that six British Cavalry regiments 
and thirty-seven British Infantry battalions were attached to and temporarily 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 41 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

formed part of the 1st Canadian Division in tiic course of some ten days during 
the Battles of Yprcs, 1915. Tlieir story is inextricablj' woven into the history 
of the 1st Canadian Division during that period and just as much so as the 
record of a Canadian battalion. 

Arrangements have been partially carried through for the compilation of 
a history of the Canadian Engineers in the Great War on lines somewhat similar 
to the l^Icdical History already written. 

Much work has been devoted to the preparation of further maps to illus- 
trate the fighting of Canadian troops in the Great War for inclusion in the 
official History. 

Arrangements have been made with the War Office for the supply of maps 
and black impressions not already in possession. These are necessary for 
reproduction and the work of compilation, transferring boundaries, dispositions 
and objectives for war diaries and other records will be proceeded with on 
receipt. In the meantime this work is already in progress or has been com- 
pleted in respect to maps and black impressions already available. 

The Section has continued its function of giving all possible assistance to 
regimental historians. 

The manuscripts and maps of the History of the P.P.C.L.I., one of the 
most outstanding regimental histories which has yet seen light in the British 
Empire, were read and conmientcd upon prior to publication. The assistance 
afforded by the Historical Section from time to time during the compilation of 
this History from June, 1921, onwards was generously acknowledged in the 
preface when the work was published. 

The historian engaged on the record of the 4th C.M.R. spent some time in 
this section, when all relevant documents were placed at his disposal. A map 
and legend were subsequently compiled for his use, showing every move of this 
battalion during the Great War. The late struggle on the Western front is 
regarded as almost entirely a stationary war, apart from its opening and closing 
stages, and except by those who actually served the extent to which individual 
units were moved around is scarcely realized. The case of the 4th C.M.R. is 
typical. During that battalion's 42 months' service in France its headquarters 
were established in over 200 places. 

Other regimental histories in course of preparation in respect to which it 
has been possible to give assistance by means of advice and supply of material 
to the historians arc: — 

The Royal Canadian Dragoons. 

The Roval Canadian Regiment. 

13th Battalion R.H.C. 

42nd Battalion R.H.C. 

1st Pioneer Battalion (9th Canadian Railway Troops). 

Belonging practically to this category, a history of the war activities of 
the Y.M.C.A. is in course of compilation by that organization. In order to 
assist, copies of Routine Orders, O.M.F.C, dealing with the organization and 
establishment of the " Military- Services Department Canadian Y.M.C.A." in 
the field and in England were secured and supplied to the National Council, 
Y.M.C.A. of Canada. 

Data relating to the history of the affiliated Canadian Battalions, i.e., the 
13th, 42nd, and 73rd Battalions, R.H.C, was prepared and forwarded to the 
Black Watch, Perth, Scotland, for inclusion in the history of that regiment 
now being written. 

Work is progressing in the preparation and collection of material for a 
file on each C.E.F. unit which served in the field. This should be of value to 



42 NATIOXAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Regimental Historians wliose eliief difficulty is the erection of a framework of 
facts into which the more intimate history of the unit can be fitted. It is 
intended that Active Militia units whicii perpetuate C.E.F. units should be 
given a copy for their records. Each file will contain the following: — 

Skeleton History. 

Origin and formation. 

Battle Honours. Colours. Badges, etc. 

Detailed action in each battle, and moves. 

Tactical Commanders with dates. 

Nominal Roll and Record of Services of Officers. 

Honours and Awards. 

Statistics — 

(o) Casualties. 

(b) C.E.F. units contributing and personnel supplied to Battalion. 

(c) Total Other Ranks passed through. 

Historical Monographs on Military Subjects in Connection with the 
History of Canada 

A full account of the military operations in the campaign in Northwest 
Canada in 1885 was prepared from original sources, illustrated by a sketch map 
of the theatre of operations, with the movements of the several columns noted 
thereon. 

A similar narrative of the military operations arising out of the Fenian 
Raids of 1866 and 1870 were also compiled from contemporary records. In 
addition, in order to determine a claim for a Battle Honour, the Historical 
Section carried out a special investigation of the rather confused records of the 
fighting at Ridgeway, June 2, 1866, and prepared for the Battle Honours Com- 
mittee a clear narrative of events. 

A thorough study has been made of Militia Reports, Militia Acts, and 
other original sources for a monograph on the development of the Military 
Forces of Canada from 1855, when the first Militia Act for United Canada was 
passed, to the outbreak of the war. This monograph is now in course of pre- 
paration and will be drawn upon for an introductory chapter to be included in 
the History of the Military Forces of Canada in the Great War showing the 
gradual evolution of the militia organization as it existed in 1914. 

A summary of operations of the Canadian Cavalry Brigailc was prepared, 
covering all the battles in which the cavalrj- regiments participat<'d. 

A summary of the Second Battle of Ypres was supplied to the St. George's 
Society, Hamilton, Ont., and included in this was a copy of the German official 
list of the various engagements to illustrate the offensive from the German side. 

To assist in the preparation of lectures, addresses and literary articles 
various militia officers and others were provided with material. Among other 
instances were the following: — 

A map and short account of the Battle of Festubert. 

Synopsis of the history of the 1st Canadian Infantry Battalion, together 
with chronological list of Commanding Officers, statement of casualties, details 
of personnel supplied by reinforcing battalions and complete list of decorations 
awarded to personnel of the battalion. 

Similar information respecting the 54th Battalion, C.E.F. 

Information regarding the services of the 2nd Canadian Machine Gun 
Brigade. 



NATIOXAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 43 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

In response to a request from Scotland in connection with tlic writing; of 
the story of the Davidson tartan and the services of units throughout the 
British Empire whicli wore that distinctive dress, an outline history was pre- 
pared of the 48th Regiment (Highlanders') from date of organization in 1891 
to 1914 and of tiie services in the Great War of its perpetuated C.E.F. units — 
the 15th. 92nd and 134th Battalions, C.E.F.— giving all the main features of 
the activities of thc<e units during the period of their existence. 

Information regarding the Battle of Vimy Ridge witli lantern slides of 
map. 

In response to another request particulars were extracted from various 
sources and a statement compiled showing the approximate number of men who 
passed through Valcarticr Camp in 1914. 1915, 1916, 1917 and 1918, and the 
number of troops trained at Borden during 1916, 1917 and 1918. 

Supply of Information to Historical Investigators 

Numerous calls for information and documents have been made upon the 
Section under this head and have been complied with. Among them are the 
following: — 

Triplicate War diaries checked, all missing folios to the number of 2,050 
duplicated from originals, and the completed triplicate copies supplied to per- 
petuating units or to accredited historians — 

Canadian Cavalry Brigade. 

Lord Strathcona's Horse. 

Fort Garry Horse. 

Canadian Corps Cavalry Regiment. 

Canadian Ligiit Horse. 

5th Canadian Siege Battery. 

11th Canadian Infantrv Brigade. 

8th Battalion, C.E.F. 

42nd Battalion, C.E.F. (R. H. of C). 

102nd Battalion, C.E.F. 

The Fort Garry Horse was also supplieri with copies of various other records 
of an historical character from their custody parcels to replace similar docu- 
ments which had been lost. 

Tliis Section was requested to provide material and information for the 
Canadian Exhibition Motor Train about to tour France under the direction 
of Senator Beaubien. Maps, statements of strength, casualties and captures 
were furnished, prepared in form suitable for display, as well as lists of lantern 
slides which were available. 

For the Czechoslovak Military Museum, Prague, certain printed official 
reports and memoranda were supplied in addition to a set of bronze Maple Leaf 
badges as worn by Canadian troops in the Great War. 

Various official and semi-official publications of which extra copies were 
available in the Section were donated to the — 
Departmental Library. 
Parliamentary Library. 
Dominion Archives. 
Imperial War Museum. 

Furtlier material (additional to that referred to in the last annual report) 
was supplied to the Royal Military College, Kingston, for record on panels or 
tablets in the Sir Arthur Curric Hall, including notes and charts of the convoy 
carrying the First Canadian Contingent and lists of battles in which Canadian 
troops took part. 



44 XATIOXAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

The Oshawa War Memorial Committee was given a list of tlie names of 
towns, villages and other places where Canadians fought in the Great War and 
Irom which stones might be secured for inclusion in the proposed memorial 
and also lists of battles and other engagements in form suitable for engraving 
thereon. 

The Directorate of Records (which, in turn, has been helpful in furnish- 
ing statistical and other information to this Section) was supplied, on request 
with information regarding unit locations, burial places and casualties. 

Extracts from Militia Orders. General Orders, Militia Lists and Annual 
Reports of tlic Department, relating to organization, designation and circum- 
stances of formation of Lord Strathcona's Horse (R.C.) were made and 
forwarded to the Commanding Officer. 

The Section was called upon to furnish a nominal roll showing: — 

Rank Overseas, 

Appointment Overseas, 

Decorations, 

Present Rank, 

Present Address, 
of all sur\'iving oillcers of field lank coming within certain categories who 
served in the Canadian Corps during the period that the Corps was commanded 
by the present Governor General. The total number of ofiBcers included in the 
roll was approximately 400 and much time and labour were necessary to ensure 
that no officers were omitted and to obtain the necessary particulars. 

In response to an inquiry from outside the Department another list was 
compiled of all pur\'iving senior officers (Lieut. -Colonels and upwards) who 
ser\'ed with the Canadian Corps, showing the various appointments held by 
them and their present rank, decorations and addresses. There was a total of 
382 officers. 

Apart from the foregoing the usual stream of enquiries continued to flow 
into the Section throughout the j'ear from official and private sources. These 
ranged from a local request for the origin of the name Nepean Point. Ottawa, 
to an enquirj' from Shanghai, China, as to tlie services of Danes who enlisted 
with the Canadian Expeditionar\- Force. Each was dealt with in its turn and 
frequently much i-esearch was invoh^ed before an answer could be furnished. 

(6) The Royal Canadian Air Force 



The reorganization of the Canadian Air Force following the formation 
of the Department of National Defence, under which the naval, militarj- and 
air forces of Canada are now groupc-d together in one Department, has been 
completed during the period under review. The reorganized force, now known 
as the Royal Canadian Air Force, His Majesty the King having graciously 
granted pemiission for the use of the Royal title, has, under the new regulations, 
the following composition: — 

(a) The Active Air Force. 

(b) The Rcsen-c Air Force. 

(a) The Active Air Force comprises: — 

1. The Permanent Active Air Force of Canada consists of officers and 
airmen permanently embodied or employed for continuous service, and is avail- 
able for general service. It is maintained for the instruction of the Non- 
Permanent Active Air Force. 



NATIOXAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 45 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

2. Tlic Non-Pcrnianent Active Air Force is comprised of such units or 
dctachiiicnts and other formations as are from time to time named by the 
Governor in Council. 

(J>) The Royal Canadian Air Force Reserve consists of qualified officers 
and ainnen. Tiic personnel are liable to be called out for such training as may 
be prescribed. 

The period of service in time of peace for the Royal Canadian Air Force 
is as under: — 

(a) For the Active Air Force, three years. 

(b) For the Reserve Air Force, such a period as may be prescribed by the 
Governor in Council. 

No non-permanent Active Air Force units have as yet been formed as 
financial limitations have made this impossible. For the same reason it has 
not boon possible to provide training for any of the Air Force Reserves. 

During the year the reorganization and formation of the permanent Air 
Force has necessitated a complete revision of the regulations under which 
the Air Force operates. The King's Regulations and Orders for the R.C.A.F., 
1924. wore duly approved by His Excellency the Governor in Council on the 
15th of January, 1924. Pay, dress and other subsidiary regulations have also 
had to be entirely recast during the year. The sub-committees formed for 
these duties have finished their work, the new regulations are now approved 
and will come into operation on the 1st of April. 1924. 

Under the old regulations the Air Force was on a non-permanent militia 
basis, the officers and men being normally called up for duty for one month 
in every twenty-four. Certain officers required for staff and instructional pur- 
poses were employed for longer periods. These were chosen from the best 
qualified officers available and they undertook longer tours of duty when the 
nature of their work so required. 

In the permanent Air Force, thus constituted, officers and men will make 
the Air Force their profession for life, in the same way as do the sailors and 
soldiers in the sister services. So far as conditions permit the Air Force 
Regulations follow closely the precedents set in the Alilitia and Naval Services 
of Canada and the terms of sers'ice are as much alike as the varying conditions 
to be met with in the three services permit. The scheme of organization, train- 
ing and equipment will also follow the example of the Royal Air Force in so 
far as the different scale of the two serA'iccs and natural conditions of the 
countries allow. 

The operations for ci\'il government departments were, under the old organi- 
zation, undertaken by a civil organization who held their appointments under 
the Civil Scr\-ice Commission. This branch has now been abolished and the 
duties formerly carried out by it have been amalgamated with those of the 
permanent Air Force. Under the old organization all stations, except Camp 
Borden, were nm on civilian lines. All stations have now been absorbed as 
integral units of the permanent Air Force, under Air Force discipline, manned 
entirely by commissioned officers and enlisted men. 

A report covering civil aviation and operations of the R.C.A.F. for Civil 
Oovemment departments during the year 1923 has already been published 
(copies of this may be obtained upon application to the Secretary, R.C.A F., 
Department of National Defence, Ottawal. In this report are given full details 
as to civil aviation in the country', including operations of commercial aviation 
firms and the activities of the R.C.A.F. undertaken in conjunction with other 
Departments of the Government, for the better protection of forests from fire, 
aerial surveying, exploratory work, transportation in remote parts of the 
country, fishery- protection, etc. It will therefore not be necessar>' to deal 
with these phases of the work in this report, which is confined entirely to Air 
Force duties. 



46 .VATIOXAL DEFEXCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
R.C.A.F. Organization 

The R.C.A.F. is a directorate of the Chief of Staff's Branch in the Depart- 
ment of National Defence. It is divided into three sections as follows: — 
Director, R.C.A.F. 

(1) Assistant Director, Air Staff and Personnel. 

(2) Assistant Director, Supply and Research. 

(3) Assistant Director and Secretary'. 

(1) The Branch of the Assistant Director, Air Staff and Personnel, is 
divided into four sections, — 

(a) Personnel, 

(b) Training, 

(c) Civil operations, 

(d) Intelligence duties, 
each under its own Staff Officer. 

(a) This section deals with appointments, promotions, transfers, courts 
of inquir\', regulations, pay, dress and other similar matters. 

(b) This section is responsible for the training of the R.C.A.F., including 
cadet training, combined operations with the militarj- and naval forces, courses 
of instniction and all other matters connected with Air Force training and 
operations. 

(c) This section deals entirely with the operations undertaken in con- 
junction with civil branches of the Government Sendee and includes such work 
as forcstrj- and fishery patrols, aerial survey, photography, transportation, 
preventive patrols, etc. 

(d) The Air Intelligence Officer is responsible for the collection, recording, 
and dissemination of all Air Force intelligence. He works in collaboration 
with tlie militar]*' and naval intelligence staffs and is at all times in the closest 
touch with their work, so that the other services may be fully informed on 
Air Force intelligence matters and that duplication of effort in the collection of 
Defence information may be avoided. 

(21 The Branch of the Assistant Director of Supply and Research is 
divided into two sections: — 

(a) The technical and research, 

(b) The equipment and supply. 

(a) The technical and research section deals with the technical develop- 
ment of aeronautics, the design and construction of aircraft, engines and acces- 
sories, their maintenance, questions of airworthiness of civil aircraft, and any 
other aeronautical engineering questions arising. 

(6) This section deals with all matters pertaining to the supply of equip- 
ment, storekeeping duties, storage depots, the disposal of surplus equipment 
and other duties of a like nature. It is responsible for all indents made on the 
Contracts Branch for the purchase of supplies so that adequate stocks of all 
classes of material may be maintained at all times for the proper execution 
of the various duties of the Air Force. 

(3) The Secretary's Branch is responsible for the control of civil a\'iation, 
including the licensing of pilots and air engineers; the registration, inspection 
for airworthiness, and marking of commercial aircraft; in.<pection and licensing 
of airharboun?. and the comluct of commercial a\'iation operations generally. 
This branch is also responsible for the preparation of the Air Force estimates 



NATIOXAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 47 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

and reports on tlic work of the Air Force, the control of the civil staff and 
other civil duties. Tlie control of ci\'il aviation is carried out by the Controller 
of Civil Aviation, an officer of the permanent Air Force, appointed to this 
branch for these duties. 

R.C.A.F. Units 

Vancouver Air Station. — This Station was established in the summer of 
1920 at Jericho Beach, on English bay, just outside the city. The site is an 
ideal one and was granted by the provincial Government free of charge. It 
originally was part of an old naval reserve, the property of the Imperial Gov- 
ernment, and was given by them to the pro\'ince when no longer required for 
its original purpose. 

Tlie station is now well equipped for its purpose, a large concrete plat- 
fonn for handling machines, with slipway for launching them being built in 

1920 21 and permanent hangars and workshops built during 1922. A wireless 
station is now under construction to provide for communication with machines 
during flights. 

The operations carried out at this station are as follows: — 

R.C.A.F. duties. 

Combined operations and training with naval and military' forces. 

Forest fire protection work for the federal and provincial governments. 

Aerial surveys and photography. 

Fisherj- protection. 

Customs preventive patrols. 

Immigration and police transportation flights. 

High River Air Station. — This station was originally established at Morley 
on the main line of the Canadian Pacmc Railway in the fall of 1920, for the 
purpose of the patrol of the forest reserves on the eastern slopes of the Rocky 
mountains. T!ie protection of these forests is of great importance. They cover 
the eastern slopes of the Rocky mountains where the great rivers flowing 
through the prairie count'rj' have their source. The denudation of these 
reser\'e« would affect adversely the whole water supply of southern Alberta, 
Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. The original base at Morley was found to be 
too close to the mountains to give good flying conditions and in the spring of 

1921 the station was moved to High River, about 40 miles south of Calgarj', 
where an admirable site was found on the outskirts of the town. During the 
past three seasons adequate buildings have been gradually provided, including 
three permanent hangars, for the housing of the machines, shops and store- 
rooms for the carr\'ing out of repairs and storage of material, office accommo- 
dation and a wireless station, so that the base is now well found in ground 
facilities. Sub-stations at EckAnlle at the northern limit of the forest patrol 
and Pincher creek, towards the southern extremity have been leased. These 
landing fields were necessary in order to double the cfficiencj- of the patrol 
system by providing for a complete reconnaissance of the situation in the forest 
reserve twice daily. 

The operations carried out at this station are a.s follows: — 

R.C.A.F. duties. 

Combined operations and training with militan,- forces. 

Forest fire protection. 

Aerial sur\-eys. 

Aerial photography. 



48 NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Winnipeg Air Station. — The headquarters of this unit was established at 
Fort Osborne Barracks during 1922. Previous to that the headquarters were 
situated at Victoria Beach on Lake Winnipeg during the summer season and in 
rented premises in the city of Winnipeg during the winter, where tiie over- 
haul of the flying boats used in the forestry- patrol and aerial sun-ey work in 
nortliern Manitoba was carried out. Though this arrangement was perfectly 
satisfactory so long as the unit was a civil one, it was deemed e-ssential to 
provide a better base for its headquarters on the reorganization of the unit 
on an Air Force basis. Fortunately, accommodation for the personnel was 
available at Fort Osborne Barracks and the adjacent tract of land, suitable for 
aerodrome purposes, has been purchased. 

Up to the present, funds have not permitted the erection of both hangars 
and workships on the aerodrome site but it is hoped that this may be possible 
before long. 

Victoria Beach is now a sub-base to the Winnipeg Station and, with 
Norway House and Lc Pas, is used as an operating base for the summer opera- 
tions for other Government departments in Manitoba and northern Saskatch- 
ewan. Wireless communication has been established, with the assistance of the 
Royal Canadian Corps of Signals, between the three bases and the headquarters 
at Winnipeg. A slipway, platform and hangars have been provided at Victoria 
Beach for the maintenance and overhaul of machines during the summer 
months. The three sub-bases are closed during the winter and the personnel 
and machines withdrawn to Winnipeg, where they are employed on the over- 
haul of the aircraft and engines, Air Force training and courses of instruction. 

The operations carried out at this station are as follows: — 

R.C.A.F. duties. 

Combined operations and training with the military forces. 

Forest fire protection. 

Aerial surveys. 

Transportations for the Departments of Indian Affairs, Mines, Mounted 
Police, and other services. 

Camp Borden, Ont. — The Air Station at Camp Borden was built during 
the w^ar by the Imperial Munitions Board as a training ground for the R.A.F. 
units recruited in Canada. After the Armistice the station and its buildings 
were given by the Imperial Government to Canada. Tiie station, though 
admirably suited for training operations on a large scale, is too large for the 
present establishment of the R.C.A.F. The maintenance charges on the Camp 
are altogether disproportionate to the present strength of the R.C.A.F. The 
buildings are large, and as they are temporary structures the cost of their 
maintenance is high, while the fuel bill for their heating is a hca\'y charge on 
the present small Air Force estimates. Camp Borden, too, is isolated and 
difficult of access. It is far removed from centres of population and transporta- 
tion facilities are inferior, requiring heavy maintenance charges on the sidings 
from the main lines of the railways and considerable outlay in the mainten- 
ance of roads into the Camp. For these reasons it is hoped that accommoda- 
tion on a more suitable scale, involving smaller maintenance charges, will be 
made available at an early date for the training of the R.C.A.F. Plans have 
been prepared for the removal of the training base to a more convenient loca- 
tion at Long Branch, near Toronto, which would be more easy of access and 
cheaper to maintain. The estimates provided so far have been insufficient to 
allow for any expenditures on the new site. These must be faced in the near 
future, however, if efficient facilities for the training of officers and mechanics 
for the Force are to be provided. 



• I 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 49 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

Activities at this station are chiefly confined to R.C.A.F. training, and 
combined operations and training; with the military forces. 

Ottaira Air Station. — The present Iicadcjuarters of the unit at Victoria 
island arc part of the shipyard of the Public Works Department. These 
premises are not required by that department and have been made available 
for Air Force use for the present. Tlie site, while serving its temporary pur- 
pose well, is not altogether suitable as an air station. It is too near the Chau- 
diere Rapids, and while machines can be brougiit to the slipway, approach is 
difficult. The buiklings, too. are not suited for aircraft construction and storage. 
Adequate accommodation should be provided in Ottawa for the requirements 
of this unit in the near future. It is desirable that the main workshops and 
stores depot of the Force should be situated here, where they will be under close 
supervision of the technical and equipment staff at Headquarters. The operat- 
ing base at Rockliffe is part of the old rifle range property, some three miles 
below Ottawa. Good landing facilities for seaplanes in the Ottawa river are 
available, but the aerodrome is small and somewhat difficult of approach. The 
banks of the river, too, are high, and the cost of providing an adequate slipway 
for launching machines would be great. The site is also difficult of access to 
the city. 

The duties carried out at this station are as follows: — 

R.C.A.F. duties. 

Combined training and operations with military units. 

Central stores depot, R.C.A.F. 

Experimental flights for development purposes. 

Aerial surveys. 

Aerial photography. 

Transportation. ^ 

Dartmouth, A'.S.— The seaplane base at Dartmouth is situated on the 
eastern side of the outer harbour at Halifax, three miles below the town of 
Di'.rtniDUth. It was built in the summer of 1918 as headquarters of the Naval 
Air Forces engaged in the anti-submarine patrol of the Atlantic coast for the 
protection of incoming and outgoing convoys of stores and troops. It was 
transferred from the Department of Naval Service to the Air Board in 1920 
and has since been used as an operating base for machines required for R.C.A.F. 
duties in the Maritime Provinces. It is the only seaplane station open all the 
year round in Eastern Canada and is admirably situated for the training of 
the R.C.A.F., in combined operations with the Naval and Coast Defence Forces 
based on Halifax. 

Operations conducted from the station are as follows: — 

R.C.A.F. duties. 

Combined training with naval and military forces. 

Aerial surveys and aerial photography. 

R.C.A.F. Training 

Air Force training may be divided into two categories, training for officers 
and for men. 

Officers' Training. 

Training for ofiicers also falls into two classes, oflBcers' training and cadet 
training. 

Officers' Training. — Arrangements liave been made with the authorities of 
the other Services for the attachment for duty of R.C.A.F. oflBcers to courses 
17—4 



50 NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

of in?truction at tbe Royal Military College and elsewhere throughout tha 
countn,-. Special courses of instruction in various subjects have been arranged 
at the Headquarters of the various units. Arrangements have also been made 
for the senior ofiBcers of the R.C.A.F. to attend the Air Force Staff College at 
Andover in England, and to take their stafl' courses with officers of the R.A.F. 
and other Dominions. Wing Commander J. S. Scott, M.C., A.F.C., is now in 
attendance at the Staff College, and on completion of his course. Wing Com- 
mander J. L. Gordon. D.F.C., will proceed there. The Imperial authorities 
have also expressed their willingness to accept officers for training in special 
courses at their training establishments until the numbers employed in Canada 
justify the establishment of special courses of instruction in this country. 

Cadet Training. 

The idea underlying the present scheme of R.C.A.F. cadet training is to 
obtain, with the minunum expense, a class of young officer having, in addition 
to his knowledge of flying, a thorough, all-round education with special qualifi- 
cations on the technical side. With this in view arrangements have been made 
with the Canadian universities to accept for Air Force training a number of 
students in their first year from the Applied Science and Engineering faculties, 
and train them at Camp Borden during the summer vacations each year of 
their university course. A gratifying response is being received and sufficient 
numbers of volunteers are forthcoming already to ensure the success of the 
scheme. A number of Gentlemen Cadets from the Royal Military College are 
accepted each year in the same way. The scheme of training is as follows: — 

The course of training consists of three terms, each of three and a half to 
four months' duration (approximately May 15 to September 1) in three con- 
secutive years. 

To be eligible for selection, a candidate must be attending a Canadian 
university or the Royal Militarj- College of Canada. If the former, it is 
required that the candidate — 

(a) Be a member of the Canadian Officers' Training Corps, and have per- 
formed the requisite qualiiying service, and passed the practical 
examination for certificate "A" C.O.T.C. 

(b) Be following a course of study as an undergraduate, leading to a 
degree in applied science. 

(c) Be physically fit for Air Force Service as a Pilot. 

(d) Be unmarried. 

(e) Be under 21 years of age upon the commencement of the course. 

(/) Be recommended by the IMilitary Committee of the University as likely 

to become an efficient Air Force officer, 
(g) Give an understanding to complete the whole course. 

Before attending the second term, the candidate is required to be in pos- 
session of a certificate " A " C.O.T.C. 

Candidates who are gentlemen cadets attending the Royal Militarj' College 
are required to — 

(a) Be first year students who are recommended by the Commandant as 
likely to become efficient Air Force officers, or if second year students 
of the R.M.C., undertake to continue Air Force Training after graduat- 
ing from the Royal Military College, and who are recommended by 
the Commandant as likely to become efficient Air Force officers. 
(6) Be physically fit for Air Force Service as a Pilot. 

(c) Be over seventeen years of age on January 1 of the year of the com- 
mencement of the course. 

(d) Give an understanding to complete the whole course. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 51 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

District Officers Commanding the several Military Districts throughout 
Canada are responsible for the distribution of information covering Air Force 
Cadetsiiips to universities witliin their respective districts, and the forwarding 
of appHcations to the Department of National Defence. 

Status.- — While in attendance at the Royal Canadian Air Force Training 
Station, candidates are granted temporary commissions as Provisional Pilot 
Officers, and receive pay and allowances in accordance with Pay and Allowance 
Regulations for the Royal Canadian Air Force. The rates are as follows: — 

Pay. — During the first term, $3 per day; during the second term, $3.50 per 
day; during the third term, $4 per day. 

Allowances. — While travelling to and from the Royal Canadian Air Force 
Training Station, candidates receive free transportation and a travelling allow- 
ance of $5 per day. 

Messing. — Candidates are required to live in the Officers' Mess, while at the 
Royal Canadian Air Force Training Station. The mess draws a free ration on 
behalf of each candidate, but in addition, the candidate is required to pay a 
mess bill of approximately 75 cents per diem, to cover the additional cost of 
messing. 

Qiiarters, Uniform, and Medical Attention. — While under training, candi- 
dates are provided with uniform, camp equipment and quarters, medical and 
hospital services being provided as necessary without charge. 

Qvxilifi.cations. — On completion of the course, a candidate will be eligible 
for — 

(a) Appointment as Pilot Officer in Mic Royal Canadian Air Force for per- 
manent duty (the number of vacancies for such appointments will, in 
all probability, be very limited). 

(b) Appointment as Pilot Officer in the Royal Canadian Air Force for 
active duty twenty-eight days in every two years, and in emergency. 

(c) Transfer to the reserve of officers, in which case they will not be liable 
for further serA-ice, except in time of emergency. 

Owing to the unavoidable delay in the announcement of the Royal Cana- 
dian Air Force Training Scheme in 1923, only nine applicants were found to 
possess the necessary qualifications for admission to Course 1, which com- 
menced May 15, 1923. Of these nine candidates, eight proved efficient, and are 
eligible for further training. 

It has been arranged that Course No. 2 will consist of twenty candidates, 
ten of whom are being nominated by the various Canadian universities, and ten 
by the Commandant, Royal Military College. 

The second term of Course No. 1 and first' term of Course No. 2 will com- 
mence on May 15, 1924, at the R.C.A.F. Training Station. Candidates from the 
universities will report on the date of commencement, and on account of the 
Royal Military' College regular spring term ending early in June, candidates 
nominated from there will not be required to report until June 15, 1924. It is 
considered that as these candidates are specialized in military training, they will 
not be handicapped by the loss of one month. 

Training for Airmen 

Funds have not been available for the establishment of any regular train- 
ing establishment for boys up to the present. Airmen have therefore been 
entered direct from civil life and their training has proceeded at the unit to 

17— i§ 



52 NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A, 1925 

which they are attached for duty. Special courses for recruits have been held 
at Camp Borden and elsewhere, so as to give as thorough a preliminary 
training as the circumstances permit. As far as possible, trained mechanics 
are enlisted to fill tlie technical ranks. Training for airmen, iiowever, cannot 
be considered complete until .=omc suitable establishment can be pro\'ided 
wherel)y young mechanics may be thorougidy trained in Air Force duties, pre - 
paratorj' to joining a unit for actual sen-ice. 

Combined Operations With Naval and Military Forces 

Every opportunity has been taken to co-operate with the naval and mili- 
tary forces in courses of instruction and joint training exercises. The import- 
ance of such combined operations cannot be exaggerated. Under modem con- 
ditions, air co-operation is essential to the success of operations by the land 
and sea forces. In the same way. independent air operations without the sup- 
port of the sister services, can seldom push home a definite result. Familiarity 
with tiie work and organization of the navy and army is therefore essential 
to the Air Force and ^^ce versa. The peace time training of the defence forces 
in Canada does not at present permit of long or extended operations, but no 
opportunity has been missed for co-operating with the army and na^'y during 
tlie year. Combined training operations and courses of instruction have been 
carried out as follows: — 



Purpose 



Commenced 



Completed 



Number of flying 
hours 



Sarcee Camp, Alberta. 
Sarcce Camp, Alberta. 

St. John. Que 

Dartmouth, N.S 

Dartmouth, N.S 

Camp Borden, Ont. . . . 



.Staff course 

.\rtillery obsor\'ation 

Stafif course 

Battle practice 

Co-op . Sandwich Battery . . 
.Artillery observation 



AuR. 7, 192,^ 

Aug. 13, 192.'? 

.luly IB, 1923 

Oct. 8, 1923 

Nov. 11, 1923 

Nov. 19, 1923 



Aug. 9, 1923 

Aug. 14, 1923 

.lulv 27, 1923 

Oct. 13, 1923 

Nov. 11, 1923 

Dec. 5, 1923 



18 hrs. 30 mins. 
8 " 15 " 
20 " 
40 " 
05 " 
30 " 



10 " 
2 " 
38 " 



During these courses of instruction even.' opportunity was taken to pro- 
vido for observation from the air by officers of other services, so that they 
might gain experience in flying and familiarity with methods of obsen'ation, 
spotting, etc., from tiie air. In the same way the R.C.A.F. personnel were 
given evcr>' opportunity of familiarizing themselves with the work of the other 
serv'iccs. Wireless communication between aircraft in flight and the ground 
was a feature of these courses, the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals participate 
ing in the work and supervising tiie intercommunication work. Much valuable 
experience and training were gained and it is hoped that conditions may per- 
mit of the wide extension of such combined exercises in future years, for the 
mutual benefit of all sen'ices taking part. 

In addition to these regular courses, even- opportunity has been taken of 
permitting the officers of other services to participate in flights for communica- 
tion or transixjrtation purposes, so that they may become familiar with flying 
conditions and accust<im themselves to aerial observation. The attached state- 
ment shows the flying operations carried out' by the R.C.A.F. during the year, 
the number of flights, their nature, length of duration, etc. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

SUMMARY OF FLYIXG, 1923-24 



53 




Forest Fire Protection 

Forest Reconnaissance and Type Sketching 

Aerial Sur^'ey 

Aerial Photography 

Fishery Protection 

Preventive Service 

Transportation 

Experimental 

Ferr\inc of Machines 

Service Flights (Militia and R.C.A.F.) 

Miscellaneous 

Grand total 



Hrs. 


Mins. 


750 


18 


3 


25 


223 


21 


45 


30 


67 


11 


22 


55 


142 


20 


4 


10 


94 


40 


681 


30 


55 


05 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



REPORT OF THE ADJUTANT-GENERAL 

(1) Permanent Active Militia 

During the past financial year, changes have been made in the Peace 
Establishment of some of the Permanent Force units, as under: — 



— 


Officers 


Other 
Ranks 


Total 


Hones 


R.C.D 

LSH (RC) 


28 
28 
15 
37 


498 
498 
87 
103 


526 
526 
102 
140 


437 
437 


R r r s 




R.C.A.M.C 







The actual strength of the Permanent Force during the past year has been 
limited in number in accordance with the amount of funds voted by Parliament 
at the last session. 

The following table shows the Peace Establishment, Limited Establishment, 
and the actual strength in personnel of units of the Permanent Active Militia: — 





PERMANENT ACTIVE 


MILITIA 










Authorized 




Limited 






Actral 




Units 


Establishment 


Establishment 


Strength 






Offrs. 


O. R. 


Total 


Offrs. 


O.K. 


Total 


Offrs. 


0. R. 


Total 


Officers pcrmancntlv em- 




















ployed not borne on 




















Resimental Estalilish- 




















meni (Stall and Cadet 


































33 




33 


Officers seeonde<l from 




















Regimental Establish- 




















ments — not paid from 




















P F Vote 














50 
17 


" "242' 




Roval Canadian Dragoons 


28 


498 


526 


18 


250 


268 


259 


Lord Strathcona's Horse 




















(Roval Canadians) 


28 


498 


526 


18 


192 


210 


16 


183 


199 


Royal Canadian Artillery 


65 


999 


1,064 


63 


637 


700 


56 


617 


673 


Roval Canadian Engineers 


48 


360 


408 


32 


249 


281 


31 


239 


270 
























15 
36 


87 
924 


ol02 
960 


14 
29 


87 
400 


olOl 
429 


13 
25 


83 
379 


fc96 


Royal Canadian Regiment 


404 


Princess Patricia's Can- 




















adian Liclit Infantry.. 


29 


690 


719 


28 


248 


276 


29 


240 


269 


■Roval 22nd Regiment 


15 


422 


437 


13 


177 


190 


13 


176 


189 


Roval Canadian Army 




















Ser\- ice Corps 


33 


412 


445 


26 


247 


273 


27 


243 


270 


Roval Canadian Army 






















37 


103 


140 


29 


95 


124 


30 


92 


122 


Roval Canadian Ordnance 






35 


691 


726 


34 


438 


472 


34 


426 


460 


Roval Canadian Army 




Veterinary Corps 


7 


23 


30 


7 


7 


14 


7 


( 




Royal Canadian Army 






















25 


100 


125 


19 


71 


90 


19 


68 


87 


Corps of Military Staff 




















Clerks 


32 


199 


231 


8 


192 


200 


8 


188 


196 


Canadian Small Arms 






4 


2 


6 


6 


2 


8 


5 


2 


7 






Totals 


437 


6,008 


6.445 


344 


3.292 


3,636 


413 


3,185 


o,598 







aincludes 5 Officers and 36 Other Ranks employed at Wirelc.os Stations, maintained in connection 
with Royal Canadian Air Force and Dept. of the Interior (N.W.T. Rranch). 

binclutles 4 Officers and 36 Other lianks whose pay and allowances are recoverable from funds of the 
Royal Canadian .Mr I orce and Dept. of the Interior (N.W.T. Branch). 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 55 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

Organization 

Schools of Instruction for the Army Service Corps Units have been 
organized at Toronto, Halifax, Winnipeg and Victoria, being conducted by the 
Detachments of the R.C.A.S.C. at those Stations. 

Nomenclature 
Tiie Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery has been redesignated as under: — 
Old Nomenclature New Nomenclature 

No. 1 Companv, R.C.G.A. No. 1 Battery, R.C.A. (Coast Artillery) 

No. 2 Company, R.C.G.A. No. 2 Battery, R.C.A. (Coast Artillery) 

No. 3 Company, R.C.G.A. No. 3 Battery, R.C.A. (Medium ArtillerjO 

No. 4 Company, R.C.G.A. No. 4 Battery, R.C.A. (Coast Artillery) 

No. 5 Company, R.C.G.A. No. 5 Battery, R.C.A. (Coast Artillery) 

(2) Non-Permanent Active Militia 

The following changes in organization have been authorized: — 

Cavalry 

Headquarters, 8th Mounted Brigade, at London, Ont. 
Headquarters, 9th Mounted Brigade, at St. John, N.B. 

Artillery 

94th Battery, 13th Brigade, C.F.A., at Quebec, Que. 

39th Battery, 18th Brigade, C.F.A., at Lethbridge, Alberta. 

Signals 

No. 13 Signal Battalion Headquarters at Calgary, Alberta. 
No. 2 Signal Company at Edmonton, Alberta. 

Canadian Officers Training Corps 

LaSalle Contingent, C.O.T.C, at Quebec, Que. 
Ontario Agricultural College Contingent, C.O.T.C, at Guelph, Ont. 
University of Toronto Contingent, C.O.T.C, at Toronto has been 
increased from four to six Companies. 

Infantry 

29th Infantry Battalion at Edmonton, Alberta. 

14th Infantry Brigade, Military District No. 2 has been re-constituted 
and no\y includes only City Units located in the city of Toronto, 
Ont. 

Medical 

No. 4 Field Ambulance, C.A.M.C, at Port Arthur, Ont. 
No. 10 Field Ambulance, C.A.^I.C, at Moose Jaw, Sask. 

Reserve Units 

Reserve Topographical Section, Canadian Engineers. 

Localization 

The localization of units of the Non-Permanent Active Militia has been 
changed from time to time to suit the conditions and population of the countrj'. 

Alliances 

His Majesty the King has authorized several units being allied with 
regiments of the British Army during the past year. 



56 XATIOXAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
Discipline 
The discipline of the Permanent and Non-Permanent Active Militia 
during the past year has been verj' satisfactory-. 

Dental Services 
Dental treatment has been carried out at the different stations satisfactorily. 

(3) Personal Services 

The appointment of officers to the Non-Permanent Active Militia units 
has made considerable progress during the past year. Approximately some 
9,900 changes in officer personnel have taken place. 

Owing to the unsettled conditions of the country, many young ofl5cers have 
been compelled to relinquish their appointments in the active cadre and have 
eitlier been transferred to reserve units or to the Reserve of Officers. These 
officers are available for reappointment when the opportunity arises. 

The reserve formations have a large number of well trained officers with 
war experience at present, but this will gradually diminish by the age limit 
regulations and other changes which usually follow in the ordinarj' course of 
events. 

The reserve units are making prosire^s and Commanding Officers are now 
paying more attention to the proper organization of these units. 

The Reserve of Officers List, which was largely increased by the number 
of surplus officers who had to be absorbed on disbandment of the Canadian 
Expeditionary Force has been verified, with a view to having all officers wlio 
have reached the age limit for their rank, disposed of by being placed on the 
Retired List as prescribed by the regulations. The Reserve of Officers List has 
now been reduced to those officers who are actually within the regulations for 
reappointment to Active Cadres should their services become necessary. 

The following is a statement showing the nimiber of officers (including 
provisional appointments) appointed to the Active Militia (Non-Permanent) 
during the twelve months ending INIarch 31, 1924: — 

Cavalry 119 

Artillery 125 

Engineers 31 

Corps of Guides 11 

Canadian Officers Training Corps 73 

Infantry 664 

Canadian Maehine Gun Corps 63 

C"anadian .\rmy feerviee Corps 23 

Canaiiian C^orps of Signals 38 

Canadian .\rmy Medical Corps 36 

Nursing Sisters. C.A.M.C 94 

Canadian .Army Dental Corps 2 

Canadian Army \'eterinary Corps 3 

Canadian Postal Corps 

Canadian drdnance Corps (N.P.) 4 

Corps of School Cadet Instructors 59 

Canadian Militia (General List) 12 

Temporary appointments (General List) 5 

Canad ian Chaplain Ser\'ices 8 

Reser\'e of Officers 4 

Total 1 . 374 

Document Commissions 

Fourteen hundred and tiiree document Commissions were prepared and 
issued to officers who had qualified during the year. 

Warrants 

One hundred and eleven document Warrants were authorized for issue to 
those promoted to warrant rank, class 1, during the year. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 57 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

Reduction in strength (Officers) 

Owing to the necessity of economy, a reduction of 21 officers of tlic 
Permanent Force had to be effected. 

Militia List 

Difficulties were encountered in connection with a regular publication of 
the Militia List during the past year, and only one issue amended to the 23rd 
January, 1924, could be made available. Consequent upon the reorganization 
of the Canadian Militia, this book has been subject to a complete revision. 

Being a book of reference regarding all military formations within the 
Dominion as well as a guide respecting their locations, the production of revised 
editions is much desired by all responsible for the administration of military 
units, and it is hoped that its regular issue will again be made possible, at 
much siiorter intervals than during the past few years. Owing to the large 
(|uantity of reference matter of which it is composed, its publication in two 
parts has become necessary, but in the interests of economy, Part I, tiie more 
frequent issue, is only to include those portions relating to lists of officer per- 
sonnel carried on the active strength, i.e., lists that are subject to constant 
amendment by changes promulgated through the weekly Canada Gazette. It 
is the changes so incurred which require to be kept up to date in the ^lilitia 
List, and therefore more freciuent publication is a necessity. 

All Lists comprised of officers not serving on the Cadres of Units, as well 
as the Pemianent Active Militia Graduation List, Reserve of Officers, Tlie War 
Sers'ices of Officers, Retired List, and many other particulars have been assigned 
to Part IL which is also to include the War Ser\'ices of Officers now in course 
of preparation, and it is the intention to have this volume in readiness for the 
printers by the beginning of December of this year- 

(4) Medical 

Permanent Corps — Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps 

During the fiscal year ending ^Larch 31, 1924, the increased work in this 
department, owing to the amalgamation of the Royal Canadian Navy, Royal 
Canadian Air Force and Militia and Defence under the Department of National 
Defence, has been successfully carried on, and, with the exception of one Medical 
OflScer and three Orderlies, no increase in personnel has been necessary. 

One Medical Officer was appointed to the R.C.A.^M.C. on July 1, to replace 
the Medical Officer of the Non-pennanent Active Militia who had been on duty 
at Camp Borden since 1919; three other ranks also were enlisted for duty in 
this hospital. The annual report of last year pointed out the necessity of more 
hospital accommodation at Camp Borden. This- has been provided in a building 
well laid out for the purpose, where a well-equipped hospital is now available to 
meet all requirements of the camp. 

The medical work for the Royal Canadian Navy has gone on smoothly, 
all naval patients being admitted to the Militan.' Hospitals at Halifax and 
Esquimalt. One iledical Officer recently appointed to the Canadian Navy, is 
now taking a course at the Royal Naval College, Chatham, England. 

During the year training for other rank personnel of the R.C.A.M.C. was 
carried out to a limited degree. Owing to the reduced strength of the various 
detachments in districts, field training was not attompted and only training 
in first aid and hospital duties was possible. 

Dieted Station Hospitals are maintained in all districts, with the excep- 
tion of M.D. 7, 12 and 13, in each of which is an inspection room and detention 
ward. In Military District No. 3, Kingston, steps were taken, towards the end 
of the year, to prepare the Sj'denham ^Iilitar>' Hospital for a Station Hospital. 



58 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 



15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

In June the D.G.M.S. made an official visit to the Pacific coast, taking in, 
on the way, the various medical units as well as the Air Force at High River 
and the annual camps of training. He found the medical administration satis- 
factory in the different Military Districts. 

Non-Permanent Active Militia — Canadian Army Medical Corps. 

Appointments to the medical units of the Non-Permanent Active Militia 
continued satisfactorily throughout the year. The following table shows the 
strength in officers and nursing sisters as at March 31, 1924: — 



Units 


Medical 
Officers 


Q'larter- 
masters 


Nursing 

Sisters 




191 
6 
49 
86 
134 
4 


25 










4 

3 
6 


77 




198 




88 


Other Units 










Totals 


470 
39 


38 
5 


363 










Totals 


509 


43 


363 








213 
12 
14 
4 






























Totals 


752 


43 


363 







During the year there was an increase in the amount of training for 
militia medical units. One Cavalry Field Ambulance and 14 Field Ambulances 
trained at local Headquarters, while 1 Cavalry Field Ambulance and 4 Field 
Ambulances did field training at camps of instruction. At Niagara a com- 
posite detail of C.A.M.C. personnel from No. 7 Cavalrj' Field Ambulance and 
Nos. 2, 5, 16 and 19 Field .Vnibulancos trained under the senior officer present. 

Issues of surplus stores to (iovcrnment departments, without repayment, 
to the amount of S8,769.24 were made. 

As in previous years the qualified dispenser has manufactured many prepara- 
tions at a much lower cost than would be entailed by purchase in the open 
market. In the same way the mechanic employed in repairing instruments and 
hospital furniture and refitting field medical equipment has been the means of 
a considerable saving of public funds. 

Health of the Troops 

Tiie health of the troops of the Permanent Force, during the year, was 
generally good and no serious outbreaks of infectious disease occurred. A mild 
epidemic of chicken-pox, among the dependents living in barracks in Winnipeg, 
was soon under control and nothing of a serious nature developed. There were 
some forty cases of a mild form of influenza among the Gentlemen Cadets 
of the Royal Militarj- College, but the disease subsided without tlie occurrence 
of any serious complications. During annual training at the Niagara Camp 
M.D. 2, a case of smallpox developed but by prompt action in the matter of 
quarantine and vaccination, all further progress of the infection was arrested. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 59 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

The total number of patients treated during the period from April 1, 1923, 
to March 31, 1924, was 2,980, this total is made up as follows: — 

Permanent Force 1,735 

Non-lVrniancnt Active Militia 148 

Royal Military College 181 

Royal Canadian Air Force 166 

fioyal Canadian Navy 149 

Roval Navy 5 

Cadets 589 

Civilians 7 

Total 2.980 



There were 14 deaths during this period, 11 Permanent Force, 1 Royal 
Can. Air Force, 2 Civilians. 

Two thou.-and eight hundred and sixty-three Medical Boards were held 
during the year. 

Miscellaneo%is 

During the year the formation of a National Defence Centre of the St. John 
Ambulance Association was authorized. Classes were organized and lectures 
given in first aid by Medical Officers of the Permanent Force and Non-Permanent 
Active Militia. Examinations were held and 237 certificates of the association 
issued to successful candidates tiirough the National Defence Centre. 

Tlic Association of Militia Medical Officers, which last met in February, 
1914, was reorganized at a meeting held on the 9th of April, 1924, and will be 
dealt with in the next annual report. 

The final meeting of the executive of the Editorial Board of the Canadian 
War Museum, Medical Section, at which the Director General of Medical Ser- 
vices was represented, was held at McGill University on September 19, 1923. 
A full report was received as to the progress in the different sections of the 
Descriptive Catalogue. The material is now ready for tlie printer and only 
awaits authority for publication. Special arrangements for the care and up-keep 
of the Museum were made and an agreement drawn up between the Department 
of National Defence and McGill University authorities. 

The official booklet, " Instructions for the Canadian Medical Service " was 
revised and a new edition published. This includes information and instructions, 
in complete and concise form, for the Royal Canadian Navy and the Royal 
Canadian Air Force. 

The general historv of the Medical Service during the Great War, by Sir 
Andrew Macphail, O.B.E., B.A., M.D., CM., LL.D., although somewhat delayed 
in publication has now been given to the printer and may be expected in book 
form shortly. 

The storv of the C.A.M.C. with the Canadian Corps during the last 100 
days of the Great War, by Colonel A. E. Snell, C.M.G., D.S.O., has now been 
printed and will be available for distribution immediately. 

(5) Pay Services 

The situation in the Pay Department for the year 1923-24 remains much 
the same as during the previous year, excepting that the work in connection with 
the war has continued to decrease, and the time is near at hand when the duties 
consequent thereon can be completely taken over by the regular staff. 

The members of the Royal Canadian .\rmy Pay Corps and the civilian staff 
employed under this directorate deserve credit for the efficient manner in which 
they have carried out the duties assigned them during the past year. 



60 NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

The usual financial statements showing the expenditure during the fiscal 
year ending March 31, 1924, in the dififerent districts, in connection with the 
Permanent and Non-Permanent Active Militia, are embodied in appendix '' B," 
as follows: — 

1. Allowances paid to the Active Militia in the various districts. 

2. Statement of expenditure, by stations, on account of Pay and Allowances 

of the Permanent Force. 

3. Statement of expenditure on account of Pay and Allowances of OfiBcers 

and Warrant OflQcers of the Permanent Force. 

4. Statement of expenditure on account of Pay and Allowances of Officers 

and Warrant Officers of the Permanent Force, with details of expendi- 
ture by stations. 

5. Statement of expenditure on account of Pay and Allowances of Non- 

commissioned Officers and Men of the Permanent Force. 

6. Statement of expenditure on account of Pay and Allowances of Non- 

commissioned Officers and Men of the Permanent Force, with details 
of expenditure, by stations. 

(6) Records 

The administrative organization of the directorate and the functions of its 
different sections during the period under review remain as outlined in the annual 
report for the fiscal year 1922-23. There was, however, a total decrease of 137 
in the personnel employed, but notwithstanding this decrease, very satisfactory 
progress was made in all branches of the post-war problems with which the 
directorate has to deal. 

Every effort has been made to locate ex-soldiers for whom war medals are 
available, and in this task great assistance has been given by tlie Department 
of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment. There remain for distribution, however, 
approximately 2,809 1914-15 Stars. 91,013 British War Medals, 54.255 Victory 
Medals, 1,129 Memorial Crosses, 5,886 Memorial Plaques, and 5,608 Memorial 
Scrolls. 

Four hundred and twenty-four applications for Service Medals other than 
the Great War were received and dealt with by the Awards Board, and 280 of 
these were awarded and transmitted for presentation. 

The total despatch of awards is as under: — 

War Sprviro Badges 671 

Kinc's Cortificates 79 

Moilals and Decorations 83 

1914-1.5 Stars 424 

Long Scn-iec and Good Conduct Medals 55 

C.A.F. Officers Decorations 92 

C.A.F. I.one Ser\'ice Medals 117 

Fenian Raid 8 

N. W. Rebellion ^8 

Memorial Crosses 796 

Porolls 1,839 

Planups 1, 796 

Rriti.sh War Medals 20, 609 

Victory Medals 14,325 

Total 40,902 

Four hundred and seventy-one new estates were received for distribution, 
579 full estates were distributed and there still remain on hand 886 full estates 
to be distributed. Funds in the custody of the directorate awaiting distribution 
amount to $164,034.19 and funds amounting to $27,258.94 are held in trust. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 61 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

During tliis year, mucli more minute researches were necessarj' than previ- 
ously due to the detailed information requested. Statistical rolls were supplied 
to five regiments, five cities, seven districts and counties, three universities and 
nine clubs and fraternal organizations. 

As the consolidation and the permanent architectural treatment of military 
cemeteries overseas nears completion, a gradual decrease of the work of War 
dravcs Section is apparent. During the year, however, 503 new graves were 
registered in all theatres and 981 burial reports despatched. 7,118 forms for the 
verification of cemetery registers and the inscription on headstones were des- 
patched to the next of kin; also 3,036 registers of cemeteries overseas were for- 
warded to the relatives. 



(7) Extract from Report of Commandant of the 
Royal Military College of Canada 

Disd'pUnc 

The college year, 1923-24, opened auspiciously with a First Class in which 
we all had implicit confidence, and none more so than myself. Special privi- 
leges were granted to them in the way of leave, etc., and until Februar\', 1924, 
the discipline enforced seemed, on the surface, to be all that could be desired. 
Owing to a regrettable incident, however, it was found essential after a search- 
ing investigation to deal severely -n-ith certain members of the Senior Class, 
and to take rigid mea.sures to ensure strict compliance with the regulations. 

Since then, with the exception of breaches of discipline by two cadets of 
junior classes, the discipline of the college has been verj- good. 

Both tlie academic and militant^ work of the cadets has been satisfactory 
and the progress made has been far ahead of any recent years. They have 
evinced a distinct inclination to study and have brought receptive minds to 
their work, with gratifying results. 

Sports 

During the past year, there has been tlie usual activity in sports at the 
college, and the college rugby football team won the Intermediate Dominion 
Championship. 

Attendance 

Sixty-seven candidates were admitted to the college in September, 1923. 
At that time the strength was 171 (with four cadets absent pending discharge). 
During the year one cadet had to retire on leave owing to ill health, and five 
cadets were discharged at the request of their parents. 

The three cadets mentioned in my last year's report as leading on account 
of ill health, and probably returning this year, did not return. 

National Defence Headquarters has been informed that there will prob- 
ably be vacancies for 50 recruits next autumn. 

Deaths 

I regret to have to report the sudden death of Lieut.-Colonel J. A. Scroggie, 
D.S.O., M.C.. P.P.C.L.I.. a member of this year's Staff College Class. 

Until September, 1923, he was a valued member of the College Staff, and 
all ranks at the R.M.C. feel that thej' have lost a real friend, and none more 
80 than myself. 



62 NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

An extremely loyal, gallant, dependable officer, he will be sincerely mourned 
by his many friends of the old 1st Division. In war and in peace he was always 
the same; full of courage, faithful, painstaking and efTicient and everyone 
admired him as an officer and considered him a very real friend. 

Medical Arrangements 

During the past year tlie health of the Gentlemen Cadets has been very 
good. No deaths have occurred. An outbreak of influenza occurred in March, 
and about forty cases developed. These cases were treated in our own hospital 
and an improvised ward in the Main building, without anj' additional outside 
help, with the exception of two orderlies, who were loaned by the Quartermaster 
from his staff of cleaners and helpers. The outbreak this year was not very 
serious and no serious complications developed. 

One hundred and eighty-one Gentlemen Cadets were admitted to the hos- 
pital for treatment during the year, and 614 attended the hospital for treat- 
ment. 

Subordinate Staff 

Military. — The work carried out by the Militarj' Subordinate Staff has 
been satisfactory in every way, and 1 am well pleased with their conduct 
throughout the year. I would not willingly lose any one of them. 

Civilian. — The work of the Ci^^l Subordinate Staff has been satisfactory, 
and I believe that each and every member has given of his best. 

Training 

This subject was thoroughly gone into by the Ad^^sor^' Board during 
their annual visit, and their general n-marks are available in their Report of 
this year. A detailed report was submitted by the Commantlant. which, upon 
examination, is considered to be adequate and satisfactory. 

Riding Establishment 

Good progress has been made by the cadets in riding, antl the usual 
syllabus of instruction has been carried out, including instruction in shoeing 
horses, fitting and assembling harness, etc. 

Improvcm-ents to College 

Many improvements to the college grounds and buildings have been made 
during the year. 

Numerous improvements have been made to the grounds generally, and 
Captain F. Yokes, R.C.E., the hard-working District Officer deserves great 
praise for his untiring efforts. 

Attached Officers 

During the past year the General Staff Branch of the Royal Military 
College has conducted two courses at the college — a Preparatory- Course for 
officers who were candidates for admission to the Staff College and a Refresher 
Course for officers of the Permanent Force. 

The Proparaton.- Course commenced on October 1, 1923. and was con- 
cluded on February 25, 1924. Five officers of the Pennanent Force attended 
it. and one officer of the R.C.A.F. was attached. The work was arranged to 
allow of that most suitable to the oflicers of the Refresher Course being taken 
up before Christmas. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 63 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

Tlie Refresher Course, which was attondetl by eleven officers of the Per- 
manent Force, with three officers of tlie R.C.A.F. attached, commenced also 
on October 1. and was concluded on December 21, 1923. During this period 
tlie officers of both courses took up the same work and worked together. 

Militia Staff Course 

The number of officers taking this course has greatly increased. Three 
hundred and twenty-five copies of each lecture and scheme have been dis- 
tributd to tiie districts, while 172 candidates have written on the examinations. 

The examinations this year have been distributed througliout the course 
instead of being all held at the end of the course as last year. This made it 
easier for candidates to take the necessarj' time to sit for the examinations. 

Officers' Courses — General 

In the various officers' courses which have been conducted by the General 
■^taff Branch of tlie college very considerable training has been given to both 
the Permanent and Non-Permanent Militia and it is hoped that this sphere 
of the college work will continue and increase. It is, however, necessarj* to 
ensure that the cost of this branch of the work is kept separate from the other 
expenditures in connection with the college and not allowed to appear as a 
charge against the education of the Gentlemen Cadets. 

The work of Colonel T. V. Anderson, D.S.O., p.s.c, has been carried out 
with signal success. He has been most painstaking in his efforts to impart 
knowledge to those attending the coiu^es, and he is a valued member of the 
R.M.C. Staff; always ready to assist in anything appertaining to the welfare 
of the college. 

Trophies and Gifts 

T. L. Church, Esq., M.V., again very kindly presented a beautiful trophy 
for the Recruits' obstacle race. 

Through the kind efforts of the Honourable, the Minister of National 
Defence, and Major-General .1. H. McBrien, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O.. the Govern- 
ment consented to the beautiful collection of silver plate of the 1st Battalion, 
The Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians) , being placed in the care of the Royal 
Militan.' College, where it is now on display in an alcove specially fitted up 
as a strong room for the purpose. 

The collection of the 1st Batt-alion. the Prince of Wales' Leinster Regiment 
(Royal Canadians) is the finest that could be seen anywhere, and it is doubtful 
if its historical value could be computed by any expert. The one hundred and 
five different pieces are of a pleasing variety, and there runs through all a 
strain of the great traditions and accomplishments of the officers and men of 
the regiment, and strong reflections of nearly every spot in the British Empire, 
for it was the lot of the regiment to serve in almost every domain where the 
Union Jack is flown. 

Th Honourable the Minister of National Defence has also presented to the 
college a valuable collection of medals of the late and other wars, which have 
been placed at the entrance of the Educational building with other war trophies, 
thus enlarging the interesting and valuable collection already at the college. 

All ranks at the college feel sincerely grateful to the Honourable the 
Minister for the kindly thought which prompted this gift. 



64 NATIOXAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

The college appreciates ver\' much indeed the kindness of the under- 
mentioned, who have generously presented books to the Library during the 
period under review: — 

J. R. Brown, Esq., of New York. 

W. W. Gibson, Esq., of Kingston. 

F. McLennan, Esq., K.C. of Montreal. 

Major H. T. Cock. M.C., The R.C.R. 

Captain F. Yokes, R.C.E. 

P. C. Stevenson, Esq., of Ottawa. 

Lieut-Colonel J. A. Scroggie, D.S.O., ^LC., P.P.C.L.L 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 65 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 



REPORT OF THE QUARTERMASTER GENERAL 

General 

Consequent upon tlie amalgamation of tlie Naval, Military and Air Services 
in the Department of National Defcnnc, the Qartcrmaster-General's Branch has 
taken over certain duties in connection with all services, wlicre it was con- 
sidered efficiency and economy in administration would be secured. 

These details include matters relating to all three directorates into which 
this Branch is divided, viz.: — 

1. Supplies and Transport. 

2. Equipment and Ordnance Services. 

3. Engineer Services and Works. 

The report of each serv'ice is submitted. 

(1) Directorate of Supplies and Transport 

This directorate includes all services in connection witli the Army Service 
Corps, Veterinary and Postal Corps, including: — 

Feeding and housing of troops and horses. 

Rental of buildings (in conjunction with the Department of Public Works), 

Heating and lighting of buildings, 

Transportation by land and sea (ocean, rail and mechanical transport), 

Horse transport, and the provision of publicly owned horses^ 

Veterinary services, 

Telephone services. 

Barrack services. 

Tlie necessity for the obser\-ance of the strictest possible economy has been 
recognized and this has been the governing policyT'Ifis considered, however, 
that all services are now at their minimum strength consistent with efficiency. 

Rorjal Canadian Army Service Corps 

In order to carry on sati-sfactorily, it was found necessary to obtain 
amendments to the Establishment of the R.C.A.S.C. which provided for a 
slight increase of personnel amounting to seventeen other ranks. 

The strength of this unit on the 31st of March, 1924, was 24 officers, 241 
other ranks. 

Supplies for Troops atid Horses (Permanent and Non-permanent Active Militia) 

During the period covered by this report, 1,585 contracts for various 
supplies and services were made by the Contracts Branch at the request of 
this Directorate. 

The following supplies were issued: — 

Food rations 583.824 

Hospiittl diets 22.788 

Foract' rations 285,795 

The food and forage provided by the contractors was of excellent quality 
and at very reasonable prices. The average cost per ration of food was .00112 
cents higher than the previous year, but, on the other hand, the cost of a 
forage ration dropped .00478 cents. 

The following is a comparison of the cost per ration for the past four 
years: — 

March. 1921— Food $0.47423 Forage $0.4763 

March, 1922— Food 0.33418 Forage 0.37312 



March. 1923— Food 31265 Forage 0.30092 

March, 1924— Food 0.31377 Forage 0.29614 



17- 



66 NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Accoirunodation Generally 

The remarks contained in the reports of this Branch for the years 
1921-22 and 1922-23 with regard to Permanent Force accommodation are still 
applicable. Another fire occurred in March, 1924, at Rosedale Heiglits, leaving 
only one building standing. This building is to be vacated in the near future, 
as tlie land is being disposed of by the Department of Public Works. The cost 
of upkeep of all of the Barracks with the exception of the newer groups (such 
as the Fort Osborne Barracks, TiLxedo) is now a very large item and must 
continue so until funds become available for the construction of new Barracks. 

Lighting arid Heating of Buildings 

The difficulties met with in the past few years in obtaining fuel for the 
heating of buildings have not been experienced during the period covered by 
this report. The supply was ample and generally of good quality. The use of 
bituminous coal, instead of anthracite, has been continued where feasible, and 
the danger from fire as a result of the use of this class of coal has been greatly 
lessened, due to the fact that the caretakers and firemen have become better 
informed as to the proper mode of firing this coal. A certain degree .of danger 
will, iiowevcr, always exist where heating plants and chimneys are not suitably 
constructed to burn soft coal. 

The supply of light to all buildings has been satisfactorily and economically 
taken care of. 

Transportation by Ocean and Rail 

The provision of ocean transportation is practically confined to personnel 
attending Schools of Instruction, proceeding to and returning from England. 

There are still a number of accounts covering transportation in connection 
with the Canadian Expeditionary Force outstanding, and these are dealt with 
on presentation by tiie carrier companies. 

This Branch is responsible for the issue of all rail transport. This is kept 
down to a minimum. 

The railways are giving satisfactory service in connection with the move- 
ments of troops to and from annual training camps. 

Mechanical Transport 

The number of motor vehicles owned and operated by the Department of 
National Defence on March 31, 1924, was slightly in excess of the number in 
use on the same date in 1923. This is due mainly to greater demands for 
motor transport for various services. 

On March 31, 1923, the following motor vehicles were owned by this depart- 
ment: — 

Motor cars 19 

Heavy trucks 7 

LiRht delivery trucks 24 

Ambulances 20 

Uotor cycles 5 

Total 75 

During the past fiscal year, seven motor cars and six light delivery trucks 
were purchased at a cost of $29,245.50. Two heavy Leyland trucks were also 
acquired by transfer without payment from the Royal Canadian Air Force. 



.V.-ir/0.V.4/. DEFEXCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 67 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

As a result of constant use during the past five or six years, it was found 
necessary to dispose of the following vehicles, they being found unfit for further 
ser^'ice: — 

Motor cars 4 

Ambulances 2 

Motor cycles 3 



Total. 



There were therefore the undermentioned motor vehicles, in use on March 
31, 1924: — 

Motor cars 22 

Heavy trucks 9 

Light delivery trucks 30 

Ambulances 18 

Motor cycles 2 

Total 81 

Horse Strength, Permanent Active Militia 

On March 31, 1923, the total number of horses in the Permanent Force, 
including Cavalry, Artillery, Infantry, Army Service Corps and other units, was 
754, of which number 109 were cast or sold, 19 died or were destroyed and 11 
transferred, leaving a balance of 615. 

Additional horses were acquired, by purchase, 103; by transfer, 11; and 
returned from straying, 1, or a total of 115. 

The present strength is 730, allocated as shown in the following statement: — 

Royal Canailian Dragoons 1.55 

Lord Strathcona's lIor,«e (Royal Canadians) 137 

Hoyal Military College 52 

Roval Canadian Hors<- Artillery 224 

Royal Canadian Artillery (Coast Arty, and Mobile Arty.) 33 

Royal Canadian Engineers 25 

Royal Canadian Hcgimt nt. . 17 

Princes.^ Patriria's Canadian Light Infantry 13 

H<'yal 22nd Rrgimrnt 9 

Roy;d Canadian Army Service Corpa 61 

Royal Canadian .\rmy Medical Corps 3 

Royal Canadian Ordn-ince Corps 1 



Total. 



Cartage was, for the most part, carried out by the R.C.A.S.C. Horse Trans- 
port and Mechanical Transport, but in all districts, contracts were made with 
civilian carters to supplement the above, when necessary. 

Veterinary Service 
This Branch of the service is responsible for the care and health of the 
horse strength, and although the Establishment has been reduced to a minimum, 
these duties have been very satisfactorily carried out. 

Telephones 

In view of the necessity for the exercise of the greatest economy, the 
expenditure for the provision of telephones was kept down to a minimum. 
Owing to the reopening of several Armouries closed down during the previous 
year on account of the shortage of fuel, and the organization of new units, the 
cost of telephones was slightly in excess of that for 1922-23. 

The total expenditure during 1923-24 was $14,167.22, as compared with 
S13.611.80 during 1922-23, or an increase of S555.42. 

Barrack Services 
This service is responsible for the proper conduct of all duties in connection 
with the receipt, custody, issue and accounting for fuel, light, gas, water and 
paillasse straw and also for the allotment of quarters. 
17— 5 J 



68 NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

(2) Directorate of Equipment and Ordnance Services 

During the year ending March 31, 1924, the Branch of the Director of 
Equipment and Ordnance Services carried out the usual provision and dis- 
tribution of clothing, necessaries, equipment and ammunition. Owing to lack 
of funds, many important services had to be curtailed or postponed completely 
with the result that the general provision question is now far from satisfactory. 

With the funds available in the Warlike Stores Votes this Department was 
barely able to provide for a skeleton upkeep service for the small force trained. 

Universal Baling System for Clothing and Textiles Generally 
During the year a Universal Pressure Baling System for clothing and 
necessaries was introduced for use in all Ordnance Depots. Fixed quantities of 
each class of garment were adopted to bring the weight of complete bales to 
approximately 100 pounds. It has been found that the following advantages 
have resulted: — 

(a) A very great reduction in storage space. 

(b) A reduction in transport rates. Original packing cases were heavy and 
on long freight hauls the transport charges high. 

(c) Little likelihood of pilfering en route. Once opened, the bale cannot 
be re-closed without being placed in a baling machine. 

(d) With heavy paper lining it has been found that bales are a better pro- 
tection against moths. 

(e) The work of handling in Ordnance Depots is greatly facilitated and the 
appearance of the storehouses improved. 

The Ordnance personnel have been actively employed in baling stocks of 
clothing and other trxtilrs held in all Ordnance Depots. 

Wheels 

From general reports received from Inspectors of Ordnance Machinerj- 
throughout Canada, it was found that the wood in wheels of all artillerj- vehicles 
returned from overseas had shrunk so badly that very considerable repairs were 
necessary. This repair service involved the use of highly technical machinery 
and has been well carried out. In all, there was a total of 4,000 wheels repaired. 

Petawawa Fire 

On July 17, 1923, a disastrous fire broke out in the Ordnance Depot, 
Petawawa Camp, and stores and property to the value of $97,285.23 were 
destroyed. 

A Court of Inquiry proceeded to Petawawa on July 18, and made a thorough 
investigation into the circumstances of the fire but no evidence could be pro- 
duced which would enable this court to fix the responsibility for the outbreak. 
All reasonable precautions had been taken and there was no evidence of 
negligence or carelessness on the part of the personnel. 

Inspection of War Trophies 

This department undertook to have departmental inspectors carry out the 
inspection of war trophies which have been allotted by the Deputy Minister of 
Public Archives to cities, towns, villages, etc., tlu-oughout Canada. Complete 
provincial lists were supplied to this department. These lists were arranged 
by Military Districts and forwarded to District Officers Commanding to have 
inspections carried out and reports rendered for the information of the Deputy 
Minister of Public .\rchives. These reports are to deal particularly with the 
general condition of tlie war trophies and the service is to be carried out without 
additional expense to the public. 



XATIOXAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 69 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

Removal of clothing stocks from George Street Building to Castle Building 

Tlie stock of clothing liclil at tlie Headquarters Depot, Ottawa, was removed 
from the George Street builtling to the Castle building. 

The move occupied about one month's time and was very successfully- 
carried out. 

Defective Revolvers and Revolver Ammunition 
During the past year several revolvers became damaged in firing. This 
matter is under investigation and has been referred to the War Office for advice 
on the subject. 

Q.F. IS-pr. Shrapnel 

During the Petawawa Training Season 1923, several " bursts " occurred in 
using Q.F. 18-pr. shrapnel ammunition. An immediate investigation was 
started and it was found that the '" bursts " were due to a defect in the cartridge 
case known as " annular ring." An examination was made of all cartridge 
cases which had been fired at Petawawa during the season and it was found that 
this defect was common in a large percentage of these cases. Specimens of 
defective cases were fowarded to the War Office to be placed before the Ord- 
nance Committee for report and as a result of this report it was decided that 
all cases should be thoroughly examined and any showing the defect of annular 
ring stiould not be used for firing service charges. Examination and rectification 
is being carried out at the Dominion Arsenal, Quebec. 

Inspector of Armcnircrs Services, Quebec 

During the past year the Inspector of Armourers Services perfected a sight 
base for adapting Ross Rifle Aperture Sights to S.M.L.E. Rifles. The depart- 
ment adopted this base for use, and arrangements have been made for an initial 
supply. 

The work of overhauling and repairing rifles received from overseas as 
divisional equipment was continued. 

Chief Inspector of Ainmunition 

This Branch inspected all the output of the Dominion Arsenal, Quebec, 
and in addition carried out considerable inspection work particularly in connec- 
tion with small arm ammunition. 

Dominion Arsenal, Quebec 
The following detail shows the output during the year:— 

Cartridges, S. A. Ball -455' Revolver, Mark II 800.000 

" Blank " " " " lOO.fflO 

•22' Long Rifle 730,700 

•22* " navalservice 200.000 

S. A. Ball -303' Mark VII 3,718,500 

D.R.A 200,000 

" " •303'Drill 1,000.000 

" -.SOS' Blank 500 000 

Filled B.L. or B.L.C. 15 or 12 pr. \\ lb. Blank 6,009 

Q.F. 12-pr. 12 cwt. Filled with Primpr Blank C06 

Q.F. 12-pr. 12 cwt. Filled 2 lbs. Cordite M.D. Size 11, with adapter, 

Mk. Ill 2, 134 

Shells, Q.F. Filled H.E. 12-pr. & I4-pr. Mk. V 2, 1.34 

Disrs. Marking, Butt 5,200 

Chargers, New, -303' 98,500 

Chargers, repaired -303' 64,441 

Boxes, Pistol 3, 1.39 

•303' New 3,615 

" -303' repaired 1.803 

•22' calibre 25 

" Mks. I, XI, and XV 371 

" 12-pr. r<pairi"d 277 

" 12-pr. for H.E 357 

" Metal-lined 67 

Vehicles repaired 61 



70 NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SEIiVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
The following facts in connection with last year's work are of interest: — 

(1) The Charger Plant formerly located at St. Valier street was transferred 
to the Arsenal premises. This was necessary owing to the fact that the building 
m which the Plant was located had been sold. 

(2) An oil-burning furnace has been installed in the Shell Factory for 
nosing 4-5-inch Howitzer shell. This is the first oil furnace ever installed in this 
plant. 

(3) Two thousand 12-pounder High Explosive shells were completed and 
filled with T.N.T. during the year. These shells were proved at Halifax by the 
Chief Inspector of Ammunition and functioned most satisfactorily. 

The production of High Explosive shells is a new departure as far as the 
Dominion Arsenal, Quebec, is concerned, and the results obtained arc extremely 
reassuring. 

(4) The heating system throughout the whole plant was overhauled, remod- 
elled and modernised. It is expected that this will result in greatly increased 
eflBciency and will effect a considerable saving in fuel. 

(5) Experiments were carried on in connection with the production of tracer 
ammunition and these experiments are now in a fairly advanced stage and it is 
hoped that the Dominion Arsenal will shortly be able to manufacture our total 
requirements of tliis ammunition. 

Financial Reports relating to tlic Dominion Arsenal, Quebec, will be found 
in Appendix " C." 

Inspectors of Ordnance Machinery 

Inspectors of Ordnance Machinery visited all Artillery Batteries through- 
out the country and examined the equipments generally- The condition 
of the guns and vehicles is good, but there are certain batteries particularly in 
Winnipeg, where the equipment has suffered considerably due to inadequate 
storage accommodation. Efforts have been made to obtain more suitable storage 
space but lack of funds has seriously handicapped the department. 

Supply of Cordite for Small Arm A7nmxmition for Dominion Arsenal, Quebec 

Under a five-year agreement made on the thirty-first of March, 1911, the 
Canadian Explosives Limited, manufactured Cordite, size 5/2 for use in produc- 
tion of small arm ammunition. The contract expired during the war and was 
not renewed. During the year it was represented to tlie department that unless 
a fresh contract was entered into, tlie Canadian Explosives would have to dispose 
of their Cordite plant. It was thought most desirable to have this plant retained 
and the necessary arrangements were made this year to obtain the requirements 
of 5/2 Cordite for Dominion Arsenal from Canadian Ex-plosives, Limited. 

Inspections by B.C.O.C. Inspectirig Officers of Non-Prrmancnt Units' Armft. 
Clothing, Equipment and Stores Generally 

A total of 680 Reports of Inspection of N.P. Units have been received, 
checked and recorded during the past year. Records have been maintained of 
all debits and credits in connection with deficiencies and subsequent recoveries 
of arms, clothing, equipment and stores of all units. 

It has been decided that under existing circumstances, the actual production 
of nil articles, for in=r>ertinn. each year is a necessity so far as N.P. units are 
concerned: but tliat the D.O.C. may make an exception in the case of articles 
of clothing provided a bond is obtained in each individual case and a signature 
obtained within a period not exceeding 6 months prior to date of inspection. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 71 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

Courts of Inquiry and Boards of Officers 

Proceedings of Courts of Inquiry and Boards of Officers to the extent of 
approximately 450 iiave been dealt with during the past year. These proceedings 
in the great majority of instances dealt with losses and deficiencies generally 
(if arms, clothing and equipment on cliarge of units of the Non-Permanent Force 
Rifle Associations and Cadet Corps. 

The number of proceedings dealt with is still considered to be abnormal 
notwithstanding the fact that a substantial reduction over last year is reported. 

Reports of R.C.M.P. Investigations and Activities Connected with Missing Arms 

In accordance with arrangements made with the Commissioner, the R.C.M.P. 
authorities have investigated so far as possible all losses of small arms and other 
losses of a miscellaneous nature where theft has been involved. Generally speak- 
ing, a measure of success has been obtained. Several rifles have been recovered 
from individuals who were found to be unlawfully in possession of arms and 
arrangements made for the recovered arms to be returned to Ordnance Depot or 
to unit as the case may be. 

In several cases the culprits have been brought to justice. 

Measures taken to reduce Deficiencies of Clothing and Equipment Etc. in 
Possession of Units of the N. P. Force 

\ Bond system has been introduced whereby certain arms and articles of 
clothing and equipment can only be removed from the N.P. Units .\rnioury when 
the individual concerned signs a bond form on which is recorded full particulars 
as to the articles to be removed and the full name and address of the member 
of the unit who accepts tTie articles. 

A copy of the bond form duly completed, is given to the member of the 
unit concerned and a copy is retained by the responsible accounting officer. 

Serial Numbers of Anns to be Recorded 

In order to facilitate investigations of losses of arms by the R.C.M.P. 
authorities, all District Officers Commanding have been instructed to notify all 
Officers Commanding N.P. units within the several ^lilitary Districts that a 
complete record of the serial numbers of all arms in their possession will be 
maintained in future and that R.C.O.C. Armourers will arrange to check all 
such records of serial numbers of arms when carrying out their annual inspections. 

Washing Contracts 

The usual estimates were prepared in connection with washing of blankets 
and bedding, etc. and cleaning services generally, and submitted to the Director 
of Contracts in order that the necessary contracts in each Military District 
might be awarded. 

Sales of Surplus Stores, Produce, Etc. 

Surplus, obsolete and condemned stores and clothing to the value of 
$71,925.98 were disposed of by sale or by transfer to other Clovernment depart- 
ments. 

Stocktaking 

In spite of reduced staffs, good progress has been made throughout the 
several Ordnance Depots in connection with stocktaking. Weekly Reports are 
now being received regularly at National Defence Headquarters from the whole 
of the District Ordnance Depots inclusive of Petawawa Camp. 



72 NATIOXAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
Miscellaneous 

Approximately 25,000 H.Q. files were received in the directorate during the 
past year. 

Sixteen thousand eight hundred letters were received and 21,600 letters 
were despatched. 

Corps Administration 

Establishment. — The limited establishment of the coi-ps at the present time 
is: Officers, 35 (excluding seconded officers, 4) : Other Ranks, 415, (including 75 
enlisted caretakers, but not including 2 supernumeraries (tailors) at the R.M.C. 
Kingston). During the early part of the year, the limited establishment was 
slightly increased, hut consequent upon the lack of funds, was again corres- 
pondingly reduced during the year, with a result that the present establishment 
of the Corps is approximately the same as it was at the termination of last 
financial year. The general efficiency of the corps is to an extent impaired by 
so reduced an establishment. Difficulty has been experienced during the year in 
obtaining for enlistment skilled men such as clerk-typists, textile refitters, tailors 
and saddlers. This has resulted in moves being made of personnel between 
stations to meet the situation. 

Caretakers — Armovries and Dnll Halls. — The shortage of caretakers for 
the various armouries and drill halls throughout the Dominion has again been 
brought to attention during the year, the present number of caretakers authorized 
being: Enlisted 75, Civilian Grade III (Chief Caretakers), 7, Grade II (full- 
time) 105, Grade I, (Part-time) 57. These numbers are insufficient to meet 
actual requirements, and by employing the men available to the very best 
advantage, it has only been possible to partially meet the situation. Some 35 
additional caretakers are needed to supervise valuable public property; these 
cannot be supplied from present appropriations. 

Armourers and Armament Services. — The Inspector of Armourers Services 
proceeded from Quebec to England during the past year on an instructional tour. 
He visited many of the Ordnance Depots in England and Small Arm Section at 
Weedon, obtaining first-hand knowledge in matters appertaining to small arms 
and machine guns, studying the latest Royal Army Ordnance Corps methods of 
workshop management, storage, upkeep and preservation of arms, and the 
arrangements employed to carry out annual inspections and upkeep of arms on 
units' charge. 

It is intended as far as possible to apply the Imperial Army procedure in 
Canada. 

Since returning to Canada, the Inspector of Armourers Services has 
inspected the arms on ordnance charge and the Armourers Services generally 
in London, Toronto and Kingston. Arrangements have been made for a complete 
tour of the various stations during the present year. 

Courses of Instruction. — During the past year two members of the Royal 
Canadian Ordnance Corps attended Courses of Instruction at the Artillery 
College, Woolwich, England, one taking the Armament Artificers (Fitters) 
Course and the other a course for Ammunition Examiners. Each successfully 
passed the final examinations in the respective subjects and were verj' favourably 
reported upon. 

The Armament Artificer is now doing duty in Military District No. 6 and 
the Ammunition Examiner in Military District No. 11. 

Lieut. (Tcmpy. Capt.) V. A. Curmi, R.C.O.C. is at present in England 
taking the Ordnance Officers Course. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 73 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

Two Qualifying Courses for Armourers under the Inspector of Armourers 
Services were arranged during the year. Five Armourers attended and qualified 
for the rank of Armourer Staff Sergeant at the first course, and 8 at the Course 
which terminated on June 30 last. 

Revision of Standing Orders and Corps Forms 

Standing Orders for the Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps have been revised 
and recompiled during the j-car. These orders have been approved and are 
now being printed; distribution of copies will be made as soon as they become 
available. 

During the year 61 enlistments into the Corps were effected and the follow- 
ing discharges were carried out: — 

For usual reasons 25 

Compulsory (on reduction of strength) 31 

(3) Engineer Services and Works, 1923-24 
Nature of Woi'k covered by Engineer Service Vote 

The Vote for Engineer Services and Works provides funds for, — 
(a) The design, construction and maintenance of all Defence Department 
(Militia Service) works, buildings, general machinery and accessories; w'ater 
and lighting systems; drains, parades, roads, bridges, culverts, piers, fortifi- 
cations, field works, telephones, surveys. Engineer launches, etc. Certain large 
works of the above nature are carried out by the Departmnt of Public Works. 
(6) The charge and conservation of lands, stores, unoccupied buildings, camp 
grounds, rifle and artillery ranges, the property of, or held by, the Department of 
National Defence. 

(c) The operation of military telephones. Defence Electric lights, water 
supply and lighting systems, water transport, etc. 

(d) The preparation and custody of all plans, drawings and documents 
connected with the above subjects. 

Personnel for Engineer Services 

The Quartermaster General is charged with the general supervision of the 
above mentioned services and working under that official at Headquarters is a 
Director of Engineer Services directly in charge of all work and personnel- A 
small staff is maintained at Headquarters for administrative and inspection 
purposes. In each district are one or more Engineer Officers with the necessary 
staff for the execution of the various services. Work is carried out by military 
labour, by civilian labour under the supervision of military personnel, or by 
civilian contractors. 

Distribution of Expenditure 

The funds voted for 1923-21 were expended almost entrely for maintenance 
of existing buildings and works. The following table shows the percentage of 
funds expended according to the class of building and work: — 

p.c. 

Maintenance of Rifle Ranges Ill 

" Barracks, includini; offices, quarters, stables, workshops, etc 34-2 

" Ordnance Buildings 6-3 

" Drill ITalls 19-7 

" Camp Clrounds 10-2 

" Fortifications 5'7 

" Arsenals 2'1 

" Royal Milifari' ColIeRo 6-4 

New construction, Connaught Rifle Range 4-3 

100 



74 NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
The distribution of expenditure in the various districts was as follows: — 

p.c. 

JI. D. No. l—H.Q. London, Ont 70 

2— H.Q. Toronto, Ont 7-4 

" 3— H.Q. Kingston, Ont 8-3 

Royal M ilitary College, K ingston 6-5 

Ottawa Services 1.2 

Petawawa famp 31 

ConnajKlit Rifle Range 9-1 

M. D. No. 4— H Q. Montreal, P.Q 6-0 

" 5— " Quebec, P.Q 14-5 

6— " Halifax, N.S 180 

" 7— " St.John, N.B 2-3 

" 10 — " Winnipeg, Man 7-5 

II— " E.squimalt, B.C 5-3 

" 12— " - Refiina, Sask 1-3 

" 13— " Calgary, Alta 2-5 

The existing buildings and works have been maintained in a fairly satis- 
factory condition except for the roofs of several drill halls which it is hoped 
will be renewed during 1924-25. It will be noted that the only new work 
carried out was at the Connuught Rifle Ranges. A new building for the joint 
use of the Dominion of Canada Rifle Association, the local Militia units and 
the Small Anns School, was erected which ha.-* made a verj' great improvement 
in the facilities for rifle practice and training at this range. A cottage for 
permanent occupation by the Foreman of Works was constructed which will 
make for greater efficiency in the operation and maintenance of the range 
generally. 

Future Requirements 

The existing accommodation for the Permanent Force is not satisfactorj\ 
The most urgent need for new barracks exists at Toronto and at Halifax. 
Preliminarj' plans have been made for new barracks at Long Branch, Toronto, 
and further study of the requirements is going on at present. Married quarters 
are required at everj- Permanent Force Station. The service generally would 
attract a better class of men and greater efficiency would be attained if more 
married quarters could be provided. 

^lany armouries require repairs that cannot well be further delayed. Many 
new rifle ranges are required and several old ranges have inadequate danger 
areas, due to the increased range of modern ammunition. A growing demand 
exists for new rifle ranges for use not only by the Militia but also by Ci^^lian 
Rifle Associations and Cadet Corps. Proper magazine accommodation is 
needed at several points in Canada, the ammunition at present being stored 
in unequitable buildings. At Halifax a combined military and naval magazine 
is an urgent necessity. Plans for such a magazine have been preparcil and it 
is hoped tliat sufficient funds for a start on this work ^all be available in 
1924-25. 

Notes on Various Agreements Made During the Year 

The following notes refer to some of the more important arrangements 
made during the year under re\aew: — 

(a) Connaught Rifle Range has been further developed and used for the 
Annual Meeting of the Dominion of Canada Rifle Association; for courses of 
instruction of the Canadian Small Arms School, and as a camping ground for 
llie local Non-Pcnnancnt INIilitia. It has proved to be most suitable for all 
the above purposes. It is expected that no further rifle practice will take place 
at Rockcliffe Rifle Range and preliminarj' arrangements for rifle practice have 
been made to pro\-ide accommodation for the local military units and Rifle 
Associations at Connaught Ranges. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 75 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

(6) An agreement has been entered into with the Forcstr>' Branch, Depart- 
ment of tlie Intercior, whereby that Branch assumes responsibility for tire pro- 
tection over a large part of Pctawawa Military Reser\'e and in return is allowed 
to carr>' out experiments in sylviculture. This arrangement works to the 
advantage of both departments. 

(c) The agreement with the Department of Agriculture whereby that 
department has the use of Connaught Rifle Ranges for grazing and haying 
purposes, has been continued with mutual benefit. 

(c!) Preliminarj- axrangcmcnts have been made with the Public Works 
Department concerning the division of expenditure by the two departments on 
buildings used by this department. For some time there has not been any 
definite nde governing such expenditures and each case was considered separ- 
atel}-. This entailed consitlerable correspondence. It is full}' expected that an 
agreement will be arrived at that will be acceptable to both departments. 

(e) There has been very close co-operation between this Department and 
the Parks Branch, Department of the Interior, concerning sites and structures 
of historical interest and a number of such sites have been handed over to the 
Parks Branch during the year under review. 

Use of Bituminous Coal 

The use of bituminous coal, reported on last year, has been continued. 
Experience has sho^Mi that with a few exceptions this coal can be used. Gen- 
erally speaking, when using it, labour costs for firing, clearing chimneys, etc., 
are greater and the smoke nuisance objectionable. In a few cases the use of 
anthracite coal has been authorized after it had been fully demonstrated that 
the use of bituminous coal was impracticable. In other cases, experience in 
firing bituminous coal has given more satisfactory results. New in.stallations 
or replacements of heating apparatus have all been of a type suitable for the 
use of bituminous coal. 

Temporary War Buildings 

Since the close of the late war, an endeavour has been made to utilize 
temporary buildings, built during the war, for various purposes. On account 
of the inflammable nature of these buildings special precautions were taken to 
guard against fire. Xot\%nt!istanding the extreme precautions, several serious 
fires have taken place and on account of the danger to both life and property 
it lias been decidefl to discontinue the use of these buildings at London and 
Toronto. The abandoning of these buildings intensifies the already great 
shortage of married quartci-s and makes it more necessarj* than ever that funds 
be provided for the construction of permanent buildings. It is proposed to 
carry out the sale of military properties not required and it is hoped that the 
proceeds of such sales may be made available for the construction of those 
buildings which are most urgently required, without expense to the public. 

Engineer Scrvic-es for li.CA.F. 

All work of a constniction nature required by the Royal Canadian Air 
Force has been carried out under the supervision of the Engineer Service, such 
sums expended being chargeable to Air Force Vote. 

Designs and specifications have been prepared for Wireless Stations and 
the hut for one station constructed in Ottawa for use by the Royal Canadian 
Corps of Signals. 

Due to the isolated location of Camp Borden, a proposal has been con- 
sidered of moving this Air Station to Long Branch and sketch plans have been 
prepared for it, in conjunction with plans for barracks on this same property. 



76 NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Training Camps 

Temporarj' Engineer Sendees for Training Camps have been carried out 
by the Engineer Sers^ccs. Satisfactorj' arrangements have been made but it 
is not possible to arrange the same comforts for the troops that could be pro- 
vided if training were on a larger scale and took place at permanent central 
camps. 

Adjustment of War Claims Vote 

The Sydenham Military Hospital at Kingston which had been temporarily 
handed over to the Department of S.C.R. was closed up by that department 
and tlie property handed back to the Defence Department, less certain build- 
ings destroyed by fire during the period. 

The provision of new offices for Headquarters, for a small military' hospital, 
and for Ordnance Stores at Kingston, has for some time been a matter of great 
importance. 

After a careful consideration of the whole situation at Kingston, it was 
decided that the Old Sydenham Hospital would, with certain alterations, pro- 
vide excellent accommodation for the above mentioned purposes. The work 
was put in hand during the late fall and it is hoped tliat all nece^san.- alt-cra- 
tions will be complete early in 1924-25. 

This is the only large work that has been undertaken during the year. 

Naval Services 

Minor work in fitting up quarters for tiie Royal Canadian Naval Volun- 
teer Reserve has been carried out under the supervision of the Engineer Ser- 
vices, funds being provided from the Naval Vote. 

Cadet Services 

Temporary' Engineer Se^■^^ces required for Cadet) Camps were carried out 
by the Engineer Ser\'iccs, funds being provided from the Vote for Cadet 
Services. 

TT'orA- Carried Out in 1923-34 

The following is a list of the more important work carried out in 1923-24 
and chargeable to the Vote for Engineer Services and Works: — 

Military District No. 1 

London. — Wolselcy Barracks, fitting up and renovation for accommodation 
for R.C.R.; provide gjmnasium for R.C.R. Armouries, install new boilers. 
Stratford. — Armouries, renew hot water boilers. 

Military District No. 2 
Toronto. — Stanley Barracks, external painting; complete lavatory; stables, 
replace swinging bales with partitions. 
Oshawa.- — Armoury, internal painting. 
Hamilton. — New armouries, new roof. 

Niagara Camp. — Cavalry lines, extension of drainage; horse lines. 
Camp Borden. — Concrete bases for masts, etc., radio plant. 

Military District No. 3 

Kingston. — Tete du Pont, general repairs to brick stables; grading barrack 
square; heating "E" block. Calderwood House, repair roof. Fort Henry, 
repairs to magazine accommodation. Artillery Park, alterations to stables. Tete 
du Pont Barracks, repairs due to fire; repair electric wiring. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 77 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

Alexandria. — Rcgrade drill hall site, sow with grass seed, concrete entrances, 
etc. 

Gananoque. — Repairs to walks at east and west ends of drill hall. 

Renfrew. — Repairs to brickwork at gable ends. 

N:ipanee. — Armoury, repairs to plumbing and shooting gallery. 

Pembroke. — Armoury, provide guard to prevent ice and snow sliding o£f 
roof. 

Peterborough. — Armoury, repairs to roof. 

Militan/ District No. 4 

Point-aux-Trcmbles. — Renew platform and overhead shelter. 

St. John's. — The Barracks, levelling, dr.iining, etc., drill area; paint interior 
and exterior of stables. 

?tl()ntreal. — Craig Street Drill Hall, alterations and interior renovations; 
repair floor in main hall; renew eaves gutters and conductor pipe; white- 
wasliing interior walls, painting, etc. Armoury, Les Carabiniers, roofing and 
plumbing work. Victoria Rifles of Canada Armoury, repair roof, brickwork, 
etc. 

Sherbrooke. — Old Courthouse, painting new porch, etc. 

Military District No. 6 

Levis. — Provide accommodation for ten Rifie Associations. Repair road 
from St. George street to No. 2 Fort. 

Quebec. — St. Louis Barracks, shed for Engineer Stores. Shell Factory, 
new floor, tool room skylight; remove smoke stack. 

Military District No. 6 

Halifax. — Citadel, R.C.A.S.C. Stables, repair drains and roadway. Cam- 
bridge Library, enlarge furnace room. Sackville Married Quarters, repair roof. 
R.A. Park, R.C.A. and R.C.E. Officers' Mess, repair damage by fire. Repair 
road from Sackville street to Citadel gate. Military Hospital, fit up vacant 
ward for use as medical store. H.M. Gun Wharf, "A" store, renew slating; 
take dowTi and rebuild chimney; machine shop, repair damage by fire. 
Armoury, main floor, renew in part. Sandwich F.C. Post, renew wire fencing 
around P.F. Cell and F.C. Post. Portuguese Cove and Devil's Island, datum 
posts for range finding instruments. Engineer Yard, repairs to wharf. Bruns- 
wick street, paving in front of military property. Cunard street, paving in 
front of military property. Queen street, paving west end "E" side and south 
end " E" side. Fort McNab, construct mobilization shelter; Master Gunners' 
Quarters, install new furnace. Ives Point Battery, erect new building, baths, 
wash house and flush closets; repairs to roof in 12-pounder magazine. Fort 
Ogihie, install heating system in equipment room. 

Military District No. 7 

Sussex. — Rifle range, repair stop butt. 
Woodstock. — Armoury, new heating plant. 
St. John. — Armourj', repairs to roof. 

Sussex Camp. — Clearing, ploughing and seeding grounds; construct and 
move cook houses, etc.; damage by flood. 



78 NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
Military District No. 10 

Winnipeg. — St. Charles Rifle Range, repairs to caretaker's cottage; com- 
petitors' huts. Main Street Armouries, external painting. Fort Osborne Bar- 
racks, Station Hospital, linoleum. 

Brandon. — Rifle Range, repairs to caretaker's cottage. 

Camp Hughes. — Temporary repairs to Ordnance Equipment Building. 

Military District No. 11 

Esquimalt. — Work Point Barracks, renew floors in barrack rooms; mar- 
ried quarters, build nine doorways; hospital, install heating plant; oSicers' 
rms. and qrs., kalsomine where required; improve playing and parade 
grounds; hospital, electric light wiring. Provide additional ordnance accom- 
modation by conversion four naval coal sheds. Additional ordnance accom- 
modation as above. 

New Westminster. — General repairs to drill hall. 

Military District No. 12 

Moosomin. — Armoury, new roof covering. 
Maple Creek. — Armoury, new roof covering. 

Military District No. 13 

Calgary. — Sarcee Camp, reshingle roof of men's mess building. Artillery 
mess and hospital building (contract to Baird Construction Co., Ltd.). Sarcee 
Indian Reserve, clearing brush from artillery ranges. 

The following is a. list of Military properties disposed of during the fiscal 
year 1923-24: — 

Military Properties sold or transferred to other Dcpartirvents 

Bcamsville, Ont. — Old Drill hall and site sold to the municipalitj' of Leeds 
and Lansdowne for S400 under authority of Order in Comicil dated July 
30. 1023. 

Burlington Heights, Ont. — Old military cemetery transferred to the Depart- 
ment of the Interior under authority of Order in Council dated July 16, 1923. 

Campbellville, Out. — Old drill hall sold for $205; site transferred back to 
the original donor, Mr. Felix Devlin, under authority of Order in Council dated 
October 19, 1923. 

Oshawa, Ont. — Drill hall site — a strip containing 240 square feet — sold for 
$420 under autliority of Order in Council dated November 25, 1923. 

Kingston, Ont. — Part of Sydenham Hospital site sold to T. A.. McGinnis 
for §10,000 under authority of Order in Council dated December 12, 1923. 

Kingston, Ont. — Old Shoal Tower and water lot fronting on Market Battery' 
transferred to the Department of the Interior under authority of Order in 
Council dated January 18, 1924. 

Cobourg, Ont. — Old armoury site conveyed to the town of Cobourg under 
authority of Order in Council dated October 19, 1923. 

Prescott, Ont. — Fort Wellington and site transferred to the Department of 
the Interior under authority of Order in Council dated April 19, 1923. 

Montreal, P.Q. — McGill University drill hall site reconveycd to the donors 
under authority of Order in Council dated October 14, 1923. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 79 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

Three Rivers, P.Q. — Riflo ranpp site— a rifilifc of way for an electric power 
line — was sold to the Sliawinigan Water and Power Company for $300 under 
authority of Order in Council dated August 17, 1923. 

Quebec, P.Q. — A strip of the Citadel Glacis, containing 1,185 square feet, 
was sold to Mr. J. R. Strang for $1,500 under authority of Order in Council 
dated December 30, 1922. 

Levis, P.Q. — A part of the Levis Military Reserve, containing 6-95 acres 
transferred to the Department of the Interior for sale, under authoritv of Order 
in Council dated December 19, 1922. 

Shelburne, N.S. — Nine former IVIilitary reserves, containing about 1,500 
acres, transferred to the Department of the Interior for disposal. Authority — 
Order in Council dated May 20, 1923. 

Yarmouth, N.S. — Cape Forchu Military reserve containing 8-9 acres trans- 
ferred to the Department of the Interior for disposal. Authority — Order in 
Council dated May 18, 1923. 

St. John, N.B. — Old Martello Tower, Blockhouse and site, containing about 
5 acres, transferred to the Department of the Interior. Authority — Order in 
Council dated June 30, 1923. 

N'civ We.'ttmin.tfrr, B.C. — Rifle Range site, containing 130-4 acres, trans- 
ferred to the Deiiartment of the Interior for sale. Authority — Order in Council 
dated June 23, 1923. 

St. Johns, P.Q. — 2-3 acres from the south side sold to A. E. Brunet for 
$375 under authority of Order in Council dated January 30, 1924. 

St. Johns, P.Q. — About 750 square feet transferred to the Department of 
the Interior as a site for a tablet by Order in Council, P.C. 461, dated March 
26, 1924. 

Truro, N.S. — Rifle Range — about 5 acres to the southwest of the Canadian 
National Railways transferred to the Department of Indian Affairs by Order 
in Council P.C. 486 dated March 26, 1924. 

Samia, Out. — Rifle Range — property rights formerly allowed by the Depart- 
ment of the Interior now abandoned. 

List of Military properties acquired during 1923-24 

Nil. 



80 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ACCOUNTANT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 

1923-24 

Tlie Accounts Branches of the Militia, Naval and Air Services were amal- 
gamated as from April 1, 1923, the merging of the different accounting systems 
having been secessfuUy effected since that date. Following the amalgamation, 
the Staff of the Accounts Branch at Ottawa was reduced by sixteen employees, 
or 17 per cent. There has been no change indicated either in procedure or 
personnel in respect of the work performed by employees of the Branch outside 
of Ottawa. 

The expenditure and revenue statements, and the remarks contained in this 
report relate only to Militia and Air Services, the Naval expenditure being 
dealt with in the report of the Naval Service. 

The expenditure for Militia Services during the fiscal year 1923-24 was 
practically the same as for the previous year. That for Adjustment of War 
Claims, however, was much lower than for 1922-23, due largely to the fact 
that payment of an account for £375,000, representing interest claimed by the 
British Shipping Liquidation, was withheld pending settlement of several out- 
standing accounts due Canada by the Imperial Government. There was also 
quite a substantial reduction in the expenditure in respect of belated claims for 
Separation Allowance and War Service Gratuity and for medals purchased. 

The Air Service expenditure for 1923-24 shows an increase of §244,195 over 
1922-23, which is due to the appropriation of §250,000 for the purchase of uew 
air-craft and equipment. 

Following are comparative tables of expenditure, refunds and revenue for 
the fiscaLygajs 1922-23 and 1923-24. Civil Government is not included in 
either case, it being shown in Statement No. 3, Appendix " A." 

EXPENDITURES— MILITIA .VND .\IR SER\TCES 





Militia 
Votes 


Air 
Votes 


Adjust- 
ment of 
War claims 


Imperial 

War 
Graves 


Battle- 
fields 
Memorials 


Total 


1922-23 


S 

9,797,408 
9,675,341 


S 

1,001,983 
1,249,178 


$ 

4,279,236 
678,320 


$ 

378.442 
371,785 


S 

174.945 
108,773 


S 
15,035,014 


1923-24 


12,083,397 








122,067 




3,600,916 


6,657 


66. 172 


3,551,617 




244.195 

















CREDITS— REFUNDS AND REVENUE— MILITIA AND AIR SERVICES 



Revenue 


Refunds 







Militia 
Services 


Air 

Services 


Militia 
Votes 


Demobiliz- 
ation and 
Adjust- 
ment of 

War Claims 


Air Votes 


Total 


1922-% 


$ 

466,714 
296, 784 


$ 

27,092 
11,532 


s 

293,045 
460,087 


i 

1,281,335 
106,890 


i 

311,170 
261.273 


i 

2,379,356 


1923-24 


1,136,566 








169,930 


15,560 




1,174,443 


49,897 


1,242,790 




167,042 

















NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 81 

aESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

The following statements of expenditure and revenue will be found in 
Appendix " A." 

(1) Appropriation Accounts 1923-24. 

(2) Revenue 1923-24. 

(3) Comparative Statement of E.xpenditure and Revenue for ten years, 
1914-15 to 1923-24. 

(4) Expenditure on account of Adjustment of War Claims 1923-24. 

Transport and Freight Claims 

Two thousand two hundred and sixty-one transportation accounts were 
audited and paid during the fiscal year under review; the amount outstanding 
March 31, 1924, being $11,905.82. 

Reductions made in accounts paid during the vear, resulted in a saving of 
§9,681.34. 

Settlement of the following was effected — 

8 claims for losi? and damace to shipments $ 2, 767 96 

57 applications for refund of unused po-tion of tickets 1, 103 56 

Recoverable Accounts 

Recoveries were effected during the past year of moneys expended on behalf 
of the Imperial Government and Canadian Government departments. Some of 
the accounts previously rendered the Imperial Government are still the subject 
of audit observations entailing considerable research and correspondence. 

The accounts of Canadian Battlefields Memorials and Imperial War Graves 
Commission (Canadian Agency) are dealt with by this section, together with 
many other miscellaneous recoverable accounts affecting the Militia, Naval and 
Air Services. 

Recoveries effected in the fiscal year 1923-24 were: — 

British Government — 

Recovered by cash S 428,803 36 

Other Government Departments- 
Recovered by cash or transfer warrants through the Finance Depart- 
ment 199,631 73 

Surplits Stores 

There was a decided decrease in the value of surplus stores sold during the 
year 1923-24, the amount collected and deposited to the credit of the Receiver 
General being $31,070.02, as compared with $122,542 for the previous year. 

Costs and Statistics 

As intimated in last year's report, a system to produce costs and statistics 
in respect of Non-Permanent Active Militia training was developed during the 
year under review. 

The purpose of this work is (1) to provide the Chief of Staff with financial 
and other data to assist in the administration of the training programme, and 
(2) tic pro\'ide information for the use of the department generally. 

The various training schemes arc controlled by allotments made to each 
Military' District while allotments for general training expense are controlled 
at Headquarters. 
17—6 



82 NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

District Commanders were assisted in effecting a current control of their 
allotments by monthly statements from Headquarters showing disbursements 
made from all sources. 

A complete analysis of all training expenses was carried out, the following 
data being produced, — 

For each District's troops and each scheme of training: — 

1. Numbers trained by units. 

2. Cost analysis of direct expense. 

3. Cost analysis of general expense. 

The results of the first year's work have proved satisfactorj- and beneficial 
to all concerned. 

A comprehensive Cost and Statistical Record is also maintained in connec- 
tion with the Royal Canadian Air Force, reflecting value of assets, operational 
costs, number of men days, number of flights, flight mileage, flying time, con- 
sumption of gasoline and oil, rations issued, etc. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER 

Submitted herewith are reports relative to (1) Civilian Employees, (2) 
Printing and Stationcrj-, and (3) Correspondence Registry Oflicc. 

(1) CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES 

During the fiscal year certain questions relating to allotment of duties and 
organization have been dealt with in conjunction with the Civil Service Com- 
mission. It has been found that the tentative organizations created for the 
Accounts Brancii, and the Xaval Service Branch, were inadequate, and in other 
respects unsatisfactory. The Civil Service Commission is now (March 31, 1924) 
engaged on tlie work of reorganizing these branches, and it is expected that in 
the near future they will be placed on a more satisfactory basis. 

A further reduction has been made during the year in the civilian personnel 
of the department. A number of employees, both permanent and temporary, 
have been retired and laid off and their positions abolished. 

The statement given below shows the number of civilian employees in the 
Department of National Defence (permanent and temporary I at Ottawa, and 
the amount paid in salaries on April 1, 1923, and on March 31, 1924. 





Employees 


at Ottawa 


Total Amount of 
Salaries 




April 
1, 1923 


March 
31, 1924 


April 
I, 1923 


March 
31, 1924 




433 
275 


405 

86 


$ cts. 

57,247 65 
23,349 97 


$ cts. 
52,423 56 




8,713 73 








708 


491 


80,597 62 


61,137 29 



The figures given above as of April 1, 1923, are greater than those shown in 
the annual report for the fiscal year 1922-23 as of March 31, 1923. This difference 
is due to the fact that the Naval Service and Air Force employees, who were 
brought within the Department of National Defence upon amalgamation, were 
only taken into the records of that department with effect from the beginning 
of the new fiscal year, i.e., April 1, 1923. 

(2) PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Statistical statement showing work performed and expenditure: — 



Increase 

or 
Decrease 



Printing requisitions issued 

,'^tationery requisitions issued 

Records of sales of military books 

Expenditure for prinlinR 

Eipenditure (or stationery 

Express and freight 



530 

1,607 

% 1,.595 14 

37.098 17 

39.183 21 

4,795 40 



653 

2,364 

S 1,438 80 

46,414 04 

20,874 23 

4,034 03 



•123 

•757 

$ tI56 34 

•9,315 87 

tl8,30S 98 

t761 37 



•Increase. 
17— Ci 



tDccrcaae. 



84 NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
(3) CORRESPONDENCE REGISTRY 

Statistical report on the work of the Central Correspondence Registry for 
the year ending March 31, 1924. 



Increase 

or 
Decrease 



Files charged-out 

Incomini; files recorded 

Files transferred to Daly Building 

Loose papers received 

Files created 

Separation Allowance and Assigned Pay Branch file 
combined 



275 080 
303.475 

23,742 
171,975 

12,249 

5,528 



318,539 43,459 (Inc.) 
367,957 I 64,482 (Inc.) 
Work completed 

171,6.36 339 (Dec.) 

8.153 4,096 (Dec.) 



619 



Total files handled. 



792.049 



Work com- 
pleted 



Staff— AprU 1, 1922 46 

March 31, 1923 37 



April 1, 1923 47 

March 31, 1924 46 



The apparent increase in the staff as of April 1, 1923, as ajrainst March 31, 
1923, is accounted for by the fact that up to the latter date only the Militia and 
Air Service Staffs were included. On April 1, 1923, the NaVal Service Staff 
(brought in as a result of the amalgamation) was added. 



* I 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 85 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

REPORT OF THE JUDGE ADVOCATE-GENERAL 

Under the terms of the National Defence Act, 1922, the Judge Advocate- 
General's office ceased to be a directorate in the Branch of the Adjutant-General, 
and from January 1, 1923, the Judge Advocate-General became responsible to 
the deputy minister. 

Thirty-three courts-martial were held in Canada during the fiscal year 
ending March 31, 1924, all of such courts-martial being district. This is a 
decrease of sixteen compared with the preceding year, and, generally speaking, 
the offences were not of a serious nature. This is indicative of the continued 
improvement in the discipline of the Permanent Force. 

The proceedings of these courts-martial indicate a substantial improve- 
ment in the knowledge of military law possessed by the officers sitting on the 
courts in question. It is extremely desirable, however, that a thorougli know- 
ledge of military law and the provisions of the King's Regulations relative to 
discipline sliould be possessed by all officers, and it is pointed out in this con- 
nection that the various proceedings of courts-martial and courts of enquiry 
which have come before tlic Judge Advocate-General for review indicate that 
there is still considerable room for improvement. 

As stated in the report for the preceding year, on the creation of the 
Department of National Defence the Judge Advocate-General now performs 
similar duties in relation to the Royal Canadian Na\^' and the Royal Canadian 
Air Force as he formerly did in relation to the Canadian Militia. During the 
period under review the King's Regulations and Orders for the Royal Canadian 
Air Force were prepared by that officer, and have now gone into effect. 

During the period under re\iew two amendments were made to the Militia 
Pension Act, one dealing witli the suspension, and, in certain instances, the 
continuance of the pension when the pensioner is employed in the public service 
of Canada, and the other restoring the period of service required to establish 
cligitiility for pension to twenty years, as it was prior to the amendment of 1919 
which reduced such period to one of ten years. Both these amending Acts were 
prepared by the Judge Advocate-General. 

The Judge Advocate-General has been a member of various departmental 
committees, and his duties have been increased as a result. 

0\nng to the Crown's title to considerable property under tlie control of the 
department being disputed, certain litigation has ensued. It has been the Judge 
Advocate-General's duty to prepare the necessary material in collaboration with 
the Department of Justice, and it is hoped that such litigation will effectually 
settle a number of points which have been a matter of long standing dispute. 

With a view to minimizing as much as possible the number of cases of 
deficiencies in clothing and equipment on charge to Units of the Non-Permanent 
Active Militia, proceedings have been instituted through the Department of 
Justice against the officers whom the Department considers financially respon- 
sible. The preparation of these cases and the necessary reference to the Depart- 
ment of Justice have been dealt with by the Judge .^dvocate-Cieneral. 

All important reports to Privy Council have either been prepared by him, 
or submitted for his consideration, and, in addition, he is responsible for the 
drafting of certain orders and regulations. 

As a member of the Pensions and Claims Board, administering the Militia 
Pension Act, the Judge Advocate-General has prepared numerous opinions and 
memoranda on matters affecting pensions. 

A system for simplifying the procedure followed in the issuing of orders 
and regulations was put forward by the Judge Advocate-General, and has now 
been approved and put into effect. 



86 NATIOXAL DEFEXCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF CONTRACTS 

During the fiscal year under re^^ew the functions of the Contracts Branch 
remained the same as in the preceding year. The duties of the branch include 
the purchase of all supplies of whatever nature required by the Militia, Naval 
and Air Services; the execution and supervision of contracts for the performance 
of services as distinguished from purchases, and the inspection of the supplies 
delivered on contract. 

The purchases included all those required during the fiscal year, and con- 
sisted of all the provisions, medical supplies, fuel and forage for the Royal 
Military College, the Dominion Arsenal, the Permanent Militia, Air and Naval 
Forces, and the Camps of Instruction; uniform clothing of many patterns; 
furniture; field equipment of various kinds; guns, and gun carriages; automobiles, 
trucks, and other military vehicles; small arm ammunition; paints, varnishes and 
oils, ironmongery; electrical equipment; tclcgrapli and wireless apparatus; 
armament and torpedo stores; boats, aircraft and flying equipment; and a very 
wide variety of other stores such as are necessary for the use of the Militia, 
Naval, and Air Services. 

During the year contracts were made for electric lighting; snow cleaning; 
laundry, washing and dry cleaning; cartage; conservancy and scavenging; 
repairing motor cars, tracks, steamers, lighters and motor boats, at different 
centres throughout the Dominion, and for various other services incidental to 
the proper maintenance of the Permanent as well as the Non-Permanent Military, 
Naval, and Air Forces. 

Considerable quantities of supplies were also purchased on behalf of ships 
of the Imperial Service, as well as to meet demands from Bermuda Dockyard. 

In making contracts competitive tenders were invited in practically every 
instance. 

The policy of purchasing supplies made in Canada out of Canadian material 
was continued, but when Canadian-made goods were not procurable preference 
was given to goods of British manufacture. Only in exceptional cases were 
contracts placed with firms in foreign countries, and when this was done it was 
because suitable substitutes were not available either in the home market or in 
Great Britain. 

During the year the co-ordination of the work previously done in the 
Purchasing Sections of the Militia, Naval and Air Services prior to the amalga- 
mation, was completed with the result that there is now a unified system of 
•dealing with the many demands made on the branch and which, in case of 
•emergency, can be readily expanded without disturbing the functions of the 
(branch in any degree. 



VI 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

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NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Statement No. 2.— Revenue, 1923-24. 

Militia Services — 

Advertisements S 15 00 

Barrack damages 128 71 

Rents of military property 18,819 85 

Sales of ammunition stores and clothing 390 86 

Sales of books and maps 2, 385 04 

Sales of cast horses 3, 980 25 

Sales of medals and ribbons (lost and replaced).. 17 04 

Sales of condemned stores and scrap 59, 694 20 

Sales of Govt, property (old buildings, etc.)... 4,257 11 

Discharges by purchase 6, 090 00 

Refunds for prev. years expenditure 8, 799 56 

Sundries 11 53 

$ 104,589 IS 

Pensions .\ct. 1901 deductions 124,654 11 

Royal Mil. College— Cadet fees and supplies 66, 105 09 

295.348 35 

Prem. dis. and exchange 1,319 06 

Fines and forfeitures 81 22 

Railway subsidies 35 57 



Air Services — 

Air worthiness 70 00 

Registration fees 120 00 

Air harbour licenses 80 00 

Pilots certificates 2 00 

272 00 

Rents 1 , 018 65 

Miscellaneous (Refunds prev. years expenditure 

and sundry sales) 10, 195 91 

11.486 56 

Premium dis. and exchange 45 39 

$ 



Note. — For Naval Revenue see separate report of Naval Ser\'ice. 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 





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15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



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SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

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XATIOXAL DEFEXCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Statement No. 4. — Adjustment of War Claims 

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1924 



Particulars 



Amount 



Pay and Allowances (including subsistence, rations and Assigned Pay) 

Separation Allowance 

War Service Gratuity 

Engineer services and works 

Ordnance ser\*ices 

Medical and dental services 

Travelling and transport (ocean) 

Travelling and transport (land) 

Pay of civil employees 

Rent, water, fuel and light 

Telegrams, telephones (including rentals) cablegrams and postage 

Printing and stationery 

Funeral expenses 

Grants to X.P. Active Militia on re-organization 

War trophies 

Historical section 

Medals 

Compensation for damages to property, loss of kit, etc 

Advertising 

Legal expenses 

Soldiers' dependents — transportation 

Canadian War Graves 

Conservancy and contingencies 

Total for year 

Expenditure prior to 1st April, 1923, for war services 



158,480 90 

39,285 30 

115,173 22 

9,563 97 

127.669 33 

1,130 52 

86,587 00 

42,510 01 

46.560 59 

12,944 78 

5,637 04 

2,821 75 

1,104 00 

1,000 00 

513 70 

31 50 

2,115 79 

1.450 00 

26 30 

1,113 94 

2,404 68 

17.393 37 

2,802 47 



$ 678.320 16 

1,557.652.276 00 



S 1,558,330.596 16 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 



95 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 



APPENDIX B 



The following are statements for the fiscal year showing: — 

1. Allowances paid to the Active Militia in the various Districts. 

2. Statement of expenditure by stations on account of pay and allowances 

of the Permanent Force. 

3. Statement of expenditure on account of pay and allowances of officers 

and warrant officers of the Permanent Force. 

4. Statement of expenditure on account of pay and allowances of officers and 

warrant officers of the Permanent Force with details of expenditure by 
stations. 

5. Statement of expenditure on account of pay and allowances of non-com- 

missioned officers and men of the Permanent Force. 

6. Statement of expenditure on account of pay and allowances of non- 

commissioned officers and men in the Permanent Force with details of 
expenditure by stations. 

STATEMENT No. 1— ALLOWANCES PAID TO NXN-PERMANENT ACTIVE MILITIA IN 
THE VARIOUS MIHTARV DISTRICTS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1923-24 



Military District 


Command 

Pay 

ana 

Drill 
Instruction 


Care 

of 
Arms 


Postage 

and 

Stationerj- 


Sipnallers, 
Gratuities, 
Bonu.sos, 
Musketry 
Prizes and 
Miscel- 
laneous 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture 


No. 1 


S cts. 

•IS 71 
6,231 30/ 
10,304 80 
5,529 85 
6,480 91 
3,290 98 
3.883 54 
2,184 95 
3,315 65 
3,359 60 
3,449 68 
2,642 35 


$ cts. 

2,134 94 
3,933 82 
2.558 00 
1,976 85 
2,859 30 
1,971 29 
524 25 
1,705 17 
1,310 00 
2.201 50 
1,440 00 


{ cts. 

788 00 
1,518 50 
884 50 
987 00 
564 10 
650 97 
419 00 
699 63 
630 00 
797 52 
614 50 


$ cts. 

519 00 
1,471 30 
1,987 45 
320 50 
905 00 
6S7 05 
391 50 
976 55 
784 00 
841 27 
273 40 


$ cts. 
/ '18 71 


" 2 


1 9,673 24 
17,228 42 


" 3 


10.959 80 


" 4 


9,765 26 


" 5 


7,619 38 


" 6 


7,192 85 


" 7 


3,519 70 


" 10 


6,697 00 


" 11 


6,083 60 


" 12 


7,289 97 


" 13 


4,970 25 






Total 


50,692 32 


22,615 12 


8,5.53 72 


9.1.57 02 


91,018 18 



•Paid by Chief Accountant. 

STATEMENT No. 2— SHOWING EXPENDITURE BY ST.\TIONS ON ACCOUNT OF PAY 
AND ALLOWANCES OF THE I'ERMANENT ACTIVE MILITIA FOR 
THE FISCAL YEAR 1923-24 



Station 


Strength, 

all ranks, 

March 31, 

1923 


Strength, 

all ranks, 

March 31. 

1924 


Pay and . 

Allowances, 

Officers and 

Warrant 

Officers 


Pay and 
Allowances, 
Non-Com- 
missioned 
Officers 
and Men 


Total 

Pay and 

Allowances 




209 
420 
364 
306 
273 
304 
527 

50 
486 
280 

44 
156 


198 
441 

369 
329 
271 
288 
526 

52 
502 
207 

49 
158 


S cts. 

81,680 14 
206,258 46 
191,260 84 
308.369 86 
117,6.36 57 
100,753 34 
256.202 38 

40.230 23 
197,429 88 
158,086 97 

34,865 69 

80,222 31 


S cts. 

163,421 26 
314.676 15 
269. 199 .59 
272,414 97 
203,128 91 
245,316 89 
366.249 78 

40 490 82 
338,. 397 73 
199,641 9.8 

41,394 01 
126,845 98 


$ cts. 
245.101 40 




520.934 61 




460,460 43 


Ottawa, Ont 


580,784 83 




320, 765 48 




346.070 23 


Halifax N S 


622,4.52 16 


St. John, N.B 


80,721 05 
535,827 61 


Victoria. B.C 


357,728 95 
76.259 70 




207 068 29 






Total 


3,419 


3.450 


1,772.996 67 


2,581,178 07 


4,3i>4.174 74 



96 



NATIOSAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



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100 NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



APPENDIX C 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT, DOMINION ARSENAL, QUEBEC 

EMPLOITES 

The average number of employees throughout the year was 245. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

1. Appropriation and expenditure. 

2. Statement of Moneys Received and Deposited to credit of Receiver 

General. 

3. Distribution of Disbursements. 

4. Statement of Assets and Liabilities. 

5. Capital Account. 

6. Production Statement. 

7. Reconciliation Statement. 

APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURE, 1923-24 

Total letter of credit $389,000 00 

Balaifce lapsed unexpended 3,692 66 

Gross expenditure at Quebec t 385,307 34 

Gross expenditure at Ottawa 12, 276 41 

t 397,583 75 
Less credits to current year's expenditure, 

Misppllancous refunds $ 117 05 

Sale of 200,000 rds. -22' cartridges to Halifax Dockyards 1,700 00 

S 1,817 05 

Net expenditure charged to Dominion Arsenal, Quebec, ^'ote $ 389, 997 02 

Net expenditure charged to Bonus Vote No. 435 3, 763 72 

Net expenditure charged to Custonas Dues Vote 2,005 96 

S 395,766 70 $ 395,766 70 



STATEMENT OF MONEYS RECEIVED AND DEPOSITED TO CREDIT OI" RECEIVER 
GENERAL, 1923-24 

Petty cash * 50 00 

Unused balance of travelling expenses 12 49 

Overpayment of sales tax 1 06 

Adjustment of Cost of Living Bonus 53 50 

Receipts from sale of 2,000 components, -303' cartridges, to Canadian Ex-plosivea, 

Limited 96 14 

% 213 19 

Credited to current year's expenditure S 1 17 05 

Credited to casual revenue 96 14 «, -t 

Credited to Dominion Arsenal, Quebec, Vote • 63 o5 

Credited to Bonus Vote No. 435 63 50 

Credited to casual revenue ; 96 14 

$ 213 19 S 213 19 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 101 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 

DISTRIBUTION OF DISBURSEMENTS, 1923-24 

Wages $209,829 70 

Salaries 48, 412 12 

Otlicr materials, including oils, hardware, castings, acids, factory and chemical 

supplies 32, 963 05 

Fuel 24,085 03 

•Copper 23,828 71 

Load 9.317 07 

Cordite 7, 713 00 

Power and light 6, 130 22 

Lu m ber 5, 375 59 

Xow machinery 4,128 70 

Frcicht and transport (except cartage) 3, 624 69 

Cartage 3, 243 74 

Tin 2,206 68 

Wator 2, 100 00 

Equipment 1,777 76 

Aluminum 1,770 00 

Stocl 1 , 055 02 

Telegrams, telephones and postage 752 08 

Printing and stationery 6.34 86 

Travelling expenses 461 14 

Belting 157 25 

Miscellaneous 430 61 

$ 389,997 02 

Customs dues 2,005 96 

Cost of Living Bonus 3, 763 72 



$ 395,766 70 



STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES, MARCH 31, 1924 

Assets Liabilities 

Material in stores $ 188,727 79 

InvcJitory of work in process and finished goods 184, 270 82 

Lands 299, 000 00 

Buildings 281 , 109 92 

Machinery 204,396 92 

Equipment, general 13,297 70 

Belt ing 1 , 073 70 

Gauges 7, 500 00 

Tools, loose 40,689 37 

Office furniture and fixtures 1,889 26 

Accounts payable i 2.532 16 

Surplus. Department of National Defence 1,219^423 32 



S 1,221.955 48 S 1,221,955 48 



102 



NATIONAL DEFENCE {MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 






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104 NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

RECO^"CILIATION STATEMENT, 1923-24 

fnvcntorj' of work in process and finished goods, March 31, 1923 $ 212,690 55 

Inventorj' of material in stores, March 31, 1923 234.041 95 

Value of capital assets, March 31, 1923 820,258 87 

Net expenditure, 1923-24 395, 766 70 

Additions and renewals by engineers, M.D. No. 5, (not paid for by Arsenal 

Funds) 6,760 28 

Machinery transferred from Lindsay (not paid for) 3,874 19 

Accounts payable, March 31, 1924 2, 532 16 

Inventory of work in process and finished goods, March 31, 1924 $ 184. 270 82 

Inventory of Material in Stores. March 31, 1924 1S8.727 79 

Value of Capital Assets. March 31, 1924 848,9.56 87 

Finished goods delivered during year, as per Production Statement 449,727 05 

Machinery transferred to Petawawa Camp (no payment received) 935 00 

Refund to casual revenue 96 14 

Accounts Payable, March 31, 1923 3,211 03 

% 1,675,924 70 $ 1,675,924 70 



16 GEORGE V, SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17 



INDEX 

Page 

Accommofiation 66 

Accounts— Appropriation 88 

Active Militia (Non i'crmanent) — 

Allowances 95 

Appointments 56 

Commissions and Warrants issued 56 

Organization 55 

I'ay Services 59 

Training (Units trained at Camp and Camp Schools or local Headquarters) 13 

Active Militia (Permanent). See "Permanent Force". 

Adjutant General — Report of 54 

Air I'orce, Uoyal Canadian 44 

Allowances — 

Active Militia 95 

Permanent Force 96-99 

Ammunition, Inspection of 69 

Appointments to Active Militia 56 

Appropriation Accounts 88 

Armouries — Repairs to 76 

Arsenal. (See "Dominion Arsenal".) 

Artillery 30 

Assistant Deputy Minister — Report of 83 

Aviation (Royal Canadian Air Force) 44 

Barrack Services 67 

Buildings (Armouries, etc.) Repairs to 76 

Cadet Services 30 

Camps of Instruction. Units trained at 13 

Canadian Army Medical Corps ., 58 

Canadian Army Medical Museum 59 

Canadian Kxpeditionary Force. — 

Records ( Honours and Awards) 60 

Records ( Craves, Registration of) 60 

Records (Estates'! 61 

Canadian Clfiiccrs' Training Corps, Certificates granted 25 

Canadian Small Arms School 35 

Central Registry 84 

Certificates granted (Officers) 26 

Certificates granted (Warrant Officers, N.C.O's and Men) 28 

Certificates granted (Canadian Officers' Training Corps) 25 

Chief Accountant — Report of 80 

Chief of Staff— Report of 5 

Civilian Employees 83 

Contracts — Report of the Director of 86 

Costs and Statistics, System to produce 81 

Courses of Instruction, Canada 20 

Courses of Instruction, Kngland 19 

Courses. Qualifying and Special 22 

Courts of Inquirj- on Loss of Arms, Equipment and Clothing 71 

Departmental Library 9 

Director of Contracts — Report of 86 

Dominion Arsenal — Quebec 69 

Report of Superintendent (Appendix "C") 100 

Engineer Services 73 

Equipment and Ordnance Services 68 

Clothing and Textiles, Baling System 68 

Courts of Enquiry 71 

Inspections of ( lothing and Equipment 70 

Investigations connected with missing Arms 71 

Estates, Soldiers' 61 

Expenditure — General Remarks 80 

Adjustment of War Claims Vote 94 

Allowances, Active Militia 95 

Appropriation Accounts 88 

Comparative Statement 91 

Permanent Force Pay and Allowances 96-09 

105 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (MILITIA SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



Financial Statements (Appendix "A"). 
Financial Statements (Appendix "B"). 
Flying Operations (Air Force) 

Graves, Registration of (C.E.F.) 



Historical Section 38 

Horse Strength 67 



Inspector of Armourers Scr\-ices, Quebec 69 

Judge Advocate General — Report of 85 

Librap', Departmental 9 

Lighting and Heating of Buildings 06 

Mechanical Transport 66 

Medical Museum 59 

Medical Ser\-iccs — Report of Directorate 57 

Jlilitarj' Buildings (Maintenance) , 76 

Military Operations and Intelligence 8 

Military Policy and Organization for Defence 5 

Slilitarj' Properties disposed of 78 

Militarj' Sur»-ey Division 9 

Militarj- Training and Staff Duties 11 

Militia List 57 

Militia Revenue 90 

Musketrj- 34 

Ordnance Services 68 

Pay Serv'ices — Directorate of 59 

Permanent Force — 

Establishments 54 

Organization 55 

Pay and Allowances 96-99 

Pay Services 59 

Strength 54 

Training •. 12 

Personal Services 56 

Printing and Stationery 83 

Provisional Schools of Instruction 23 

Quartermaster-General — Report of 65 

Radio Activities; Canadian Corps of Signals 32 

Records, Directorate of 60 

Recoverable Accounts ' SI 

Registration Office (Correspondence) 84 

Repairs to Buildings, Rifle Ranges, etc 76 

Revenue, 1923-24 90 

Rifie Associations 35 

Rifle Ranges, Maintenance 76 

Royal Canadian Air Force 44 

Royal Military' College, Extracts from Commandant's Report 61 

Schools of Instruction 19 

Signal Ser\'ice 30 

Small Arms Training 34 

Supplies and Transport — Report of Directorate 65 

Supplies for Troops and Horses 65 

Survey Division 9 

Training, Military, and Staff Duties 11 

Training — 

Active Militia 13 

Permanent Force 12 

Transport and Freight Claims 81 

Transportation, Ocean and Rail 66 

Transport, Mechanical ..... 66 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17a 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT 

OF 

NATIONAL DEFENCE 

(NAVAL SERVICE) 

CANADA 



FOR THE 
FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31 



lSO-lO-24 
U-1-14 



1924 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING ti MOaT EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1924 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17a 



INDEX 

Page 

1. H.M.C. Ships 5 

2. R.C.N. Establishments 10 

3. H.M.C. Dockyards 12 

4. Naval Intelligence 12 

5. Royal Canadian Naval Personnel 12 

6. Naval Stores 15 

7. General 17 

8. Financial Statement 18 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17a 



Ottawa, July 1, 1924. 

To General His Excellency the Right Honourable Lord Byng of Vimy, G.C.B., 
G.C.M.G., M.V.O., Governor General and Commander in Chief of the 
Dominion of Canada. 

May It Please Your Excellency: 

I have the honour to submit for the information of Your Excellency and 
tlie Parliament of Canada, the second Annual Report of the Department of 
National Defence (Naval J^crvice), being for fiscal year l'923-24. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

E. M. MACDONALD, 

Minister of National Defence. 



8M6J-I70— ij 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17a 



Ottawa, July 1, 1924. 

The Honourable, 

The Minister of National Defence, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Sir, — I have the honour to enclose Annual Report of the Department of 
National Defence (Naval Senice) for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1924. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient Servant, 

G. J. DESBARATS, 

Deputy Minister. 






15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17a 



Ottawa, July 1, 1924. 
Ci. J. l)&sBAR.\Ts, Esq., C.M.G., 

Deputy Minister, Department of National Defence, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Sir, — I have tlie lionour to report on the Department of National Defence 
(Naval Sen-ice) for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1924, under the following 
headings: — 

1. H.M.C. Ships. 

2. R.C.N. Establishments. 

3. H.M.C. Dockyards. 

4. Naval Intelligence. 

5. Royal Canadian Naval Personnel. 

6. Naval Stores. 

7. General. 

8. Financial Statement. 

1. H.M.C. SHIPS 

The following shif)s belonging to the Royal Canadian Na\y were in com- 
mission during the year: — 

East Coast — 

H.M.C.S. Patriot. 
H.M.C.S. Festubert. 
H.M.C.S. Ypres. 

West Coast— 

H.M.C.S. Patrician. 
H.M.C.S. Annentieres. 
H.M.C.S. Thiepval. 

H.M.C.S. Aurora has been placed out of commission. All ships of Aurora's 
class in the Royal Na^'^,• have l)een paid off. 

H.M.C. submarines C.H. 14 and C.H. 15 are in reserve. They are kept 
in a seaworthy condition and can be recommissioned on short notice. 

H.M.C.S. " patriot" 

H.M.C.S. Patriot is a destroyer. Following are particulars of her dimens- 
ions, armament, etc.: — 

Tonnage 1 . 004 

Length •; 271 feet 

Beam •. 27} " 

Draught lOJ " 

Speed -"i.? knots 

Complement 74 officers and men 

Armament — 

Guns .3 4-in. 

1 2-p<ir. pom pom 
4 Lewis 

Torpedo tubes 4 21-in. 

5 

<f.463-17a— 2 



6 NATIOXAL DEFESCE (SAVAL SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Tlic Patriot was presented as a free gift to the Canadian Government in 
1920 by tlie British Admiralty. The ship has been in commission since its 
arrival in Canada, and is used for training personnel of the Royal Canadian 
Na\'\' and Royal Canattian Naval Volunteer Reserve. 

During the summer of 1923, Patriot cruised along the Canadian coast 
and up the St. Lawrence as far as Montreal. En route the ship called at Sorel 
Three Rivers, Quebec, and Pictou. The cruise began on June 2, and was com- 
pleted on July 24. In addition to the complement. Patriot had on board twenty- 
six ratings and one officer of the Royal Canadian Naval \'ohinteer Reserve. 

While undenvay the personnel of both services trained in gunnery, tor- 
pedo, seamanship and engine room duties. Ratings of the signal and wireless 
branches al.*o received instruction and all ratings trained in squad drill, and 
other disciplinarj- lines. Regular educational classes are held on board ship. 
For boys and ordinary seamen these classes arc obligatory. For higher rat- 
ings attendance is optional. The classes'were well attended and good progress 
has been made. 

At Montreal and Quebec local ratings of the RC.N.V.R. joined the ship 
and trained in company with the ship's personnel. The ship was inspected in 
Montreal by the Minister of National Defence and Director of Naval Service. 

At Pictou the naval personnel took part in the celebration in commemora- 
tion of the first landing of Scottish settlers in Canada. 

A five days' cruise to Lunenburg and retuni wa:< completed on July 29. 
A class of R.C.X.V.R. recruits were given practical sea training during this 
cruise. 

Patriot then sailed for Quebec calling at the following places en route: 
Murray Bay, Gaspe, Campbellton, Chatham, Charlottetown and Baddeck. 

The ship had thirty-three R.C.N.V.R. ratings on board for sea training 
and at Quebec and Charlottetown also embarked local R.C.N-V.R. ratings who 
trained with the personnel. Whilst cruising, instruction in seamanship, gunnery, 
etc., was carried out. 

The Patriot was at Chatham during the visit of His Excellency the Gover- 
nor General to that place. A Naval Guard of Honour was detailed to receive 
the Governor General who inspected the ship and reviewed the personnel. The 
Patriot returned to Halifax on September 14. 

During the international schooner races off Halifax from September 29 to 
October ^, Patriot represented Canada. The committee in charge of the races 
have reported ver>' favourably upon the excellent services rendered by the 
ship and upon the efficiency of the personnel. 

As in previous years, I'atriot proceeded to Bermuda during the winter months 
and was based on Bermuda witli ships of the North America and West Indies 
Squadron of the Royal Na\y. 

Whilst at Bermuda every opportunity was taken to carry out joint exercises 
with ships of the squadron. These exercises included not only training in 
mancemTCs with other ships but also joint training in gunnery, torpedo, signal 
and wireless telegraph. This training affords to the young Canadian f)ersonnel 
of Patriot an excellent opportunity to train in and with lai-ger ships, and to 
familiarize themselves with customs of the Royal Na\y. 

During the stay at Bermuda, opportunity was also taken to give engine- 
room ratings an auxiliary machinery course, which cannot be given in ships of 
the Patriot clans. The ratings who took the course were successful and qualified 
to be sent to England for mechanical training courses in training establishments 
of the Royal Navy. 

The reports of the Commander in Chief, North America and West Indies 
Station, "and the Commanding Gfiicer of Patriot, are gratifying and show that 



REPORT Oh' THE DEI'VTY MIMSTER 7 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17a 

tlie ability of the Canadian Navy officers and nii'n is well up to the f>tan(lards 
of the Royal Navy. The department is also pleased to note from repiirts, the 
kecnnes.s, enthusiasm and general exemplary behaviour of the personnel- 

H.M.CS. " P.^TRtCI.^N " 

H.M.CS. Patrician is a destroyer and is a sister ship of the Patriot. The 
Patrician is based on Esquimalt, and is utilized for training personnel of the 
li.C.N. and R.C.N.V.R. 

The ship cruised to Xaiiaimo during May, 1923, and called at Comox and 
Drew Harliour en rout-e. 

At Comox control parties were exercised and a shore party took musketry 
training at the ranges The ship was open to visitors and the Comox Boys 
Naval Brigade were received and shown over the ship. The ship was also open 
to visitors at Nanaimo. 

Throughout the cruise the personnel trained in seamanship, gunnery, tor- 
pedo, signal aud W/T. 

In .lune a cruise to Prince Rupert was carried out and the following places 
were visited: Port Alberni, Forward Inlet (Quatsino Sound), and Portland, 
Oregon. 

Whilst at Forward Inlet, traverses of the upper reaches of Winter Harbour 
were made. These reaches are uncharted. 

After leaving Fonvard Inlet, Patrician proceeded to sea and met H.M.S. 
Curlew, a li^jht cruiser of the Royal Navy. Joint range and inclination exer- 
cises were carried out in company with Curlew. The two ships then proceeded 
to Prince Rupert. At Prince Rupert, the Commanding Officer of Curlew 
inspected Patrician. Patrician was then opened to visitors. 

On .July 1, 1923, Crtrleio and Patrician sailed from Prince Rupert for Port- 
land, Oregon. This cruise was taken to enable Patrician to carrA' out joint 
cniising exercises with Curlew. 

During the stay of Patrician at Portland, Oregon, the ship was open ta 
visitors anil official visits were made. 

While in company with Curlew even.- opportunity was taken to carr\' out 
combined exercises in gunnerj', torpedo and manamvres, and all signal ratings 
were given instniction in Curleic during harbour periods. 

On July 23, Patrician proceeded to Vancouver to act as an escort to the 
United States destroyer bringing President Harding to that city. 

En route to Vancouver, in company with H.M.S. Curlew short range sur- 
prise torpedo attack was carried out by Curlew on Patrician. High angle firing 
was also carried out. In the strait of Georgia gunner>- an(l torpedo exercises 
and manoeuvres were performed. 

On arrival at Vancouver a reception was given by the mayor to the officers 
of Patrician and Curlew. 

On July 26, Patrician and Curleic proceeded to sea and met U.S.S. Hender- 
son with President Harding on board. A guard of honour for the President 
was proviilcd from Patrician's complement. A number of Patrician's officers 
attended the official functions at Vancouver in honour of the President. A 
reception was held in Patriciayi for officers of the U.SS. Henderson and the 
sliip's company were entertained by H.M.S. Curlew. 

On September 4, Patrician sailed for San Francisco and returned on Sep- 
tember 14. This cniise was for the purpose of meeting H.M.S. Curlew to 
embark R.C.N.V.R. ratings who had completed six weeks' training on the latter 
ship. 



8 \ATIO\AL DEFESCE (SAYAL SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

En route to San Francisco, sea boats crews exercised and R.C.NV.R. 
ratings received instruction in steering and compass. General quarters were 
also exercised. 

On September 7, Patrician met Curlew and joint signal exercises were per- 
formed. 

Upon arrival at San Francisco the Commanding Officer of Patrician and 
Captain of Curleic paid official calls and visits were also paid to Admirals of 
American ships in San Francisco harbour. 

The Curlew and Patrician left San Francisco on September 9 and proceeded 
to sea where joint exercises in gunner>-, torpedo and signalling were carried out, 
after which Patrician parted company with Curlew and proceeded to Esqui- 
malt, where it arrived on September 11. 

During the cruise everj- opportunty was taken to carry out signal and 
tactical exercises with H.M.S. Curlew. 

The fifteen R.C.X.V.R. ratings who trained for six weeks on board Curlew 
were discharged to Patrician and returned to Esquimalt. 

On September 17, the ship proceeded to Comox in company with H.MC.S. 
Thiepval. 

During the cruise, ships' companies were employed in torpedo exercises 
•and testing gun circuit-s. 

At Comox, R.C.N. V.R. ratings were given instruction in seamanship and 
a party was sent ashore for musketrj- practice. Torpedo and gunner>- practices 
were also carried out. 

H.M.C.S. Armcntieres arrived at Comox and joined Patrician and Thiepval 
on September 19. 

Joint seamanship and gunner^' exercises were performed by R.C.N.VR. 
and R.C.N, ratings from the three ships. 

While at Comox sea cadets visited Patrician and were shown through the 
ship. 

On September 24, Patrician proceeded to Bay sound for torpedo practices 
in company with Thiepval and Armenticres. The ships returned to Comox in 
the evening. 

A party was sent ashore for gunnerj- practices on the range, and R.C.N. V.R. 
ratings were given instruction in torpedo and gun drill. 

On the return journey, off Tribune bay, sub-calibre exercises were pcrfomicil 
after which the ship returned to Esquimalt. 

On October 13 the Patrician proceeded to Bamficld with the Deputy Minister 
of Marine and Fi.<herics on board. The iifel)oat station at Bamficld was 
inspected by the deputy minister, after which the ship proceeded to Esquimalt, 
where tiie deputy minister disembarked. 

On October 14 ['atrician sailed for Prince Rupert and returned to Esqui- 
malt on November 8. 

The following ports were visited: Quatsino Sound. Lowes Inlet, Caughlar. 
Anchorage, Alert Bay. Blinkinsop Bay, Drew Harbour, and Vancouver. 

At Quatsino Sound tiio ship's medical officer visited the Indian settlement 
and gave medical assistance to some of the inhabitants who were ill. 

At this point Thiepval joined Patrician and accompanied her for the 
remainder of the cruise. 

At Prince Rupert official visits were made to the mayor and Minister of 
Marine and Fisheries. 

During the cruise the heavy weather encountered gave the ship's company 
a good opportunity to train in seamanship but prevented gunnery and torpedo 
exercises. 

At Vancouver, joint exercises with the air forces were performed. 



HEPORT OF THE DEI'VTY MIMSTER 9 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17a 

On .lanuiiry 25, Patrician procicded to Bamficld. wlitTc it joined Thiepval. 
Port Aiberni and Cliristy Ray witc also \-isitt'd. During tlio cruise wireless 
telegraphy training was pcrt'ormed. At Bamfield, owing to lieavy rains, wire- 
less communication was tlifficult; altliough messages were received. Patrician 
could not send messages owing to wet insulation. 

On February 1, Patrician ciiiised to San Diego and en rout<' visited San 
Pedro and Sun Francisco. 

While at San Pedro official visits were made and the ship was opened to 
visitors. The ships returned to Ksquinialt on February 29. 

During this cruisi- rough weather was enct)untered and it was difficult to 
carry out gunnery and torpedo exercises at sea. From a point of view of 
seamanship training, however, the cruise was beneficial to the young ratings. 

While in harbour, boat pulling exercises were performed and various otiier 
instructions were given on board. 

During the year eighty R.C.N.^'.R. ratings trained at sea on voluntary 
-ervice in Patrician. 

The reports of the Commanding Officers of H.M.S. Curlew and H.M-C.S. 
Patrician show that the Patrician's personnel are efficient and are ver>' keen 
in the performance of their duties. 

The department is gi-at'ifietl with the progiess which has been made during 
the past year in the training of the ship's company. 

H.M.C. MINESWKKPERS "YPREs" AND "FESTUBKRt" 

The Y'prcs and Festubert were stationed at Halifax and were in commis- 
sion throughout the year. These two ships did not take any long cruises but 
were used at the Halifax base as training shijjs for R.C.N.V.R. officers and 
men from April 1 until October 1. 

From October 1 to March 1, officers and men of the R.C.N.R. were trained. 

Tlie training given in these two ships consisted of gunnery, seamanship, 
signalling and discipline. 

The reports show that the ships have rendered efficient service tiirough- 
out the year. The officers and men have carried out their duties in a creditable 
manner and the reports on training of resen'e forces show that good progress 
w:u5 made. 

ll.M.C'.S. ■' THIE1'V.\L " .\ND " .VK.MENTIERES " 

The Thi( pral and Armentieres were in commission througliout the year. 
During the summer of 1923. l)otli vessels were stationed at Esquimalt and 
utilized for training R.C.N.V.R. ratings. 

They carried out a number of cniiscs to Vancouver. Comox and otlier 
western ports in com])any with H.M.C.S. Patrician. 

In September, hotii ships spent Uu days at Comox in company with 
I'utrician. 

During these cruises combined tactical exercises, gunnen,- drills and sig- 
nalling practices were performed. 

During the winter months, tiie Thiepval and Armentieres were detailetl 
alternately to earn,- out Fisher\- Protection Senice duties off Bamfield. Tliis 
work was performed upon recjuest from the Department of Marine and P^isli- 
cries. The ships continuetl on fisiiery protection duties until March 1. 

Throughout tiie wliole period of patrol R.C.N.V.R. ratings were given 
training. The nature of the ser\'ices upon wiiich the ships were employe<l 
provide<l most valuable training. 



10 XATIOXAL DEFESCE (NAVAL SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

On Februan- 27, Thiepval was commissioned to proceed by way of Alaska, 
the Aleuihian islands, the northeastern coast of Russia and Japanese islands 
as far as Hakodate, to deposit petrol and oil dumps for the Round-the- World 
British flight under Major Stuart MacLaren. The laying of these dumps was 
in charge of Colonel C. E. Broome. 

During tiie cruise the complement of Thiepval was brought up to full war 
strcngtii. Lieutenant R. Shipley, R.C N.V.R., Company Commanding Officer of 
the Ottawa Half Company, and a number of R.C.N.V.R. ratings were detailed 
for service in Thiepval during the cruise. The vessel left Esquimalt on 
Febniar>- 27. 

Supplies of petrol and oil were shipped at Vancouver and the Thiepval 
proceeded to Prince Rupert on March 1, arriving on March 4. 

From Prince Rupert she proceeded along the Alaska coast, calling at 
Dutch Harbour. At the end of the fiscal year, the Thiepval was at Dutch 
Harbour awaiting final instructions in order to proceed on her cruise. 

The cruise undertaken by the Thiepval will be of great value to the young 
Canadian ratings who compose her complement, and also to the R.C.N.V.R. 
personnel. 

It is e.xpccted that the cruise will be completed and Thiepval return to her 
base toward the end of August, 1924. The total distance covered will have 
been over eleven thousand miles. 

The Thiepi'al and ArmentieiTs have both rendered valuable service in 
training Canadian rating.-; and R.C.N.V.R. reserve officers and men througii- 
out the year. 

2. R.C.N. ESTABLISHMENTS 

The Royal Canadian Naval Barracks at Halifax and Esquimalt are main- 
tained as training establishments for ratings of ti>c Royal Canadian Navy. 
Royal Canadian Naval X'oiunteer Rcscr^■e, and Roval Canadian Naval Reserve, 
and as Depots for the R.C.N. 

The training equipment installed during 1923 has been perfected and 
new e(]ui])mcnt has been installed during the past fiscal year. 

H.\UF.\X B.\RR.\CKS 

The complement has been increased from 69 to 110 ofiicers and men. The 
reason for this increase is to provide instructional stuff to deal with the train- 
ing of R.C.N.V.R. and R.C.N.R. officers and men, to maintain a percentage 
of R.C.N, ratings to fill vacancies in ships and establishments caused through 
sickness or injury", and to enable a limited number of R.C.N, ratings to attend 
professional courses in England to ((ualify for advancement. The training 
facilities at the disposal of the dipartmcnt in Canada are not yet sufficiently 
developed to permit training in all branches of ratings up to the standards in 
the Royal Na\T. The British Admiralty have permitted Canadian ratings 
to attend training establishments of the Royal Na%'A-, thereby maintaining 
the same standards of efficiency. 

The following training equipment has now been installcil at R.C.N. Bar- 
racks. Halifax: — 

Modern gim and control instruments, including director and other firing 
teachers. As far as equipment is concerned the establishments are now fitted 
to train seaman ginmers in Canada. 

Torpedo and electrical lecture room: The equipment installed will enable 
ratings to qualify in Canada for the rating of seaman torjKviomen. 



liEPOar OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 11 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17a 

A modem drill shed is in proeess of completion and will be ready for use 
early in 1924-25. 

The question of proviiling a suitable exercise ground in proximity to the 
barracks is under consideration and will be settled during the coming year. 

Owing to the large number of reser\'e ratings reporting to Halifax bar- 
racks for training, it has been ne<"essar\' to provide additional accommodation. 
This has Ixxn accomplished by converting the officers' quarters for this pur- 
IK)sc and providing new quarters for the officers in houses 9 and 10 located 
near the barracks. 

In atldition to technical training, the ratings in R.C.N, barracks are also 
given educational training. For this purpose a qualified ciN-ilian schoolmaster 
has been appointed who has given both compulsory and voluntary' training in 
academic subjects. The education of ratings is thereby safeguarded and they 
are enabled to pass the educational test. Part^ One, and the higher educational 
test neeesssary for advancement to petty officer and warrant rank resjjectively. 

The marked improvement in technical and educational ability of ratings 
has justified the action of the department in providing training facilities in 
Canada. 

The expense of sending the ratings to England for training in the subjects 
now dealt with in Canada has also been eliminated. Two hundred and fifty- 
six R.C.N.V.R. ratings and 71 R.C.N.R. ratings were trained during the year. 

ESQVIM.\LT B.\RR.\CKS 

The Royal Canadian Naval Barracks at Esciuimalt has been organized 
on the same basis as Halifax. The complement has been increased and train- 
ing has been carried out with equally gratifying results. 

A gun battery containing gims of the most modem type and of all cali- 
bres up to 6 inches has l)een installed but fire-control instmments, which have 
been ordered from the Admiralty have not yet been received. It is expected 
that the battcr>- will be fully equipped in time for R.C.N.V.R. training during 
the coming summer. 

The torpedo and electrical lecture room and drill shed have been com- 
pleted and arc now in full operation. Parade grounds have also been com- 
pleted. 

During the early part of the year, the hospital buildings were converted 
into naval barracks. This work involved many alterations, all of which have 
been carried out. 

Training has lx>en given throughout the year, not only to R.C.N, ratings 
but also to the resen'e forces, classes in gunnery torpedo, signal and seaman- 
ship, were mjiintained throughout the year. A civilian schoolmaster has been 
appointefl to give educational training. The personnel of the R.C.N, have 
taken advantage of training facilities to qualify both educationally and pro- 
fessionally for advancement. 

Two hundred and five R.C.N.V.R. ratings and ten R.C.N.R. ratings were 
trained during the year. 

GENERAL 

At both Halifax and Esquimalt. sports have been organized and the vari- 
oas lines of sport including baseball, football and hockey have been enthusi- 
astically taken up. Naval teams in all lines of sport have been entered in 
local leagues and the showing made has been creditable. 

In sport, as in the regular work, the spirit of the Na\y has been instilled 
in the men and their enthusiasm shows, beyond doubt, their readiness to 
respond to tne arduous duties of active servnce. 



12 NATIONAL DEFENCE (NAVAL SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
3. H.iM.C. DOCKYARDS 

HALIFAX DOCKYARD 

The activities of tiiis dockyard were increased during the year in order to 
undertake tlie refitting of H.iM.C. S. Patriot and minesweepers Yprcs and Festu- 
bert. Otiier work dealt with being certain rcciuirements for tlie Imperial Ser- 
vice; supervision of repairs to ships of other Ciovernment services; maint<?nance 
and upkeep of dockyard and barracks establishments, their equipment and 
plant. 

The technical staffs have been maintained at the reduced numbers durinjj 
the year despite the heavier demands placed upon them. 

Although the dockyard is being operated on a semi-closed basis, it can be 
placed in full working order on short notice. The general equipment is in good 
condition and the various elements comprising the establishment are being 
effectively maintained. 

ESQIIMALT DOCKVAKD 

I'rior to this year ver\' little work has been handled at this dockyard since 
it was closed down in 1920. This year with the operation of a Training Squadron 
and Training Estnhlishiuent on the west coast greater activities liave been 
experienced. 

Work performed includes the preparation and supervision of the contracts 
for dealing with the dockings and refits to the ships stationed West; surveying 
preparing specifications, and supervising rcjiairs to ships of other Government 
services and general maintx.'nance of works connected with the dockyard and 
barracks establishments, also plant eciuipmcnt and accessories. 

The condition of this cstalilishment as a whole hius been well maintained. 

4. NAVAL INTELLIGENCE 

The Canadian Naval Intelligence Service forms a part of the Admiralty 
World Wide Intelligence System. 

The sendee provides routine reports on naval intelligence, shipping, trade 
routes, etc., for the Ottawa area, and also keeps in close touch with other 
Intelligence areas, exchanging infoniiation and report-s of naval interest. 

Valuable assistance in the compilation of this rejwrt has been received 
from the Department of Public Works, the Harbour Commissioners, Montreal; 
the Department of Marine and Fisheries and the Department of Railways and 
Canals. 

The Canadian Naval, Military and Air Services are now co-operating in 
the closest possible manner in dealing with Intelligence matters. 

5. ROYAL CAX.VDLVN NAN AT. PKIJSONNEL 

PERSON Xf:L 

Royal Ca7iadian Navy liatnngs. — Throughout the year the policy of man- 
ning H.M.C. ships by Canadian officers and men has been followed. Royal 
naval ratings on loan to R.C.N, whose perioil of loan expired during the year 
wen- nturiiod to l-jmland and their jilaccs filled by ()ualified Canadian ratings. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 13 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17a 

A limited number of nitins^i specially qualified in gunner>- and toq>edo 
have been borrowed from the R.N. for short period? pending qualification of 
a sufficient number of Canadian ratings to meet rcquiremcntsS. 

Training in R.C.N. Barracks and H.M.C. ships. Training in ships anrl 
l)arracks has been carried out in a satisfactory manner throughout the year. 

Tlu' various cruises of H.M.C. ships have afforded excellent opportunitj' 
of training the ratings under seagoing conditions and at the R.C.N. Barracks 
special attention to gunnery and torpedo has been given as a result of the 
improved training facilities afforded. 

Educational training has also been carried out and eighty-one ratings have 
sat at the Educational Test, Part 1, examinations; nine ratings have passed 
the Higher Educational Test; fifteen ratings have qualified in England at 
Gunner>' courses and ten ratings have ciualified in Torpedo courses. 

A special effort has been made to complete engine-room ratings amongst 
Canadian ratings and all stokers and leading stokers are now R.C.N, ratings. 
During the year fourteen engine-room ratings successfully passed the Mechani- 
cal Training courses in England- One Ordnance Artificer also qualified in 
England in Ordnance courses. 

The Admiralty ha\e co-operated with the Canadian Navy in permitting 
ratings of the R.C.N, to attend the training courses in England, thereby quali- 
fying for advancement in branches, training for which, has not yet been provided 
in Canada. 

There arc now a total of 394 ratings in the Royal Canadian Nav\-, of which 
nine are borrowed from the R.N. The remainder are R.C.N, ratings. 

Officers. — There are a total of seventy-three Commissioned and Warrant 
Officers of the Royal Canadian Na\y. Of this number only four Commissioned 
and two Warrant Officers are on loan from the Royal Na's^y. The remainder 
are permanent Royal Canadian Navy officers. 

The following table shows the allocation of officers: — 

H.M.r.S. Armrnlicres 1 

H.M.C.S. Fesluhert 1 

)f.M.r..S. Xadrn (Esquimalt Barracks) 10 

H.M.C-..'^. Patrician ,5 

If .M.C.S. Patriot r, 

H.M.r,.-5. Sladacona (Halifax Barracks) II 

Hcadfiuartcrs S 

U.M.C.fi. Thiipval 2 

H..M.r..'^. Yprrs 1 

In England for Training , 29 



Officers of the Royal Canadian Navy train in ships and establishments 
of the Royal Na\y until they qualify for and arc advanced to the rank of 
Lieutenant. Those wishing to specialize arc given courses in Royal Naval 
Establishments on completion of which they arc given appointments in the 
R.C.N, in Canada, The appointments alternate approximately as far as the 
exigencies of the sen'icc permit every two years and are as follows: — 

Two years' courses in England or to H.M. ships. 

Two years' appointment to H.M.C. ships. 

Two years' appointment to shore l Headciuarters or R.C.N. Barracks). 

ROY.\L CANADl.\N NAV.M. VOLIXTEEK HK,stRVK 

The authorized strength of the R.C.N.V.R. is 70 officers and 930 men. 
The force is organized at Headquarters located at the following places and 
the numbers indicated have been recriiited: — 



.V.47'/O.Y.4L DEFEXCE (.\AVAL SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V. A. 1925 





Place 


Officers 


Men 




2 
5 
2 
4 
3 
3 
2 
3 
9 
5 
2 
4 
4 


28 


St. John > 


82 




!A 




39 


Montreal (French) 


27 




50 




80 




57 




107 




fw 




51 




54 


Calgary 




51 
39 






Total 


.50 


764 









These companies are recruited up to full strength except Charlottetown, 
Montreal and Vancouver. The companies authorized for Halifax and Victoria 
have not yet been organized. 

Four hundre<l and sixty-one ratings of tiie R.C.N. V.R. were given training 
at the bases at Hahfax and Esquimalt during the year. Tliirty-two officers 
also performed their compulsory annual training. 

A large percentage of the ratings who reported for annual conipulsor>" 
training also performed voluntary- service afloat for periods ranging from one 
to three months. The voluntary- service afloat was carried out in H.M.C.S. 
Patriot, Patrician, H.M.8. Curlew, Calcutta and Constance. 

Company headquarters' drills have also been well attended most of the 
ratings having shown keen interest in the success of their respective companies. 
The few who did not complete the number of drills required by the regulations, 
have been discharged from the force and their places have been filletl by more 
suitable applicants of which most companies have a waiting list. 

Each company headquarters has been supplied with a field gun, rifles, 
and a naval cutter ?ully equipped for training purposes. The St. John, Char- 
lottetown and Vancouver companies have also been given the use of private 
yachts for training their personnel. 

Sports have been organized by the R.C.X.V.R. companies, who have taken 
up football, baseball and hockey and have entered their local leagues under 
R.C.N. V.R. colours. In sports as in the work of the force the ratings have 
shown keenness, enthusiasm and efficiency. 



ROV.\I, r.\X.\l)I.\X NAV.M. KKSKKVK 

The R.C.N. R. forces authorized is 70 t)tficers and 430 men, recruited from 
amongst seafarin-j^ personnel. Recruiting for the force is carried out locally 
by registrars appointed at Halifax, Lunenburg, v^t. .John. Charlottetown. Quebec. 
Montreal. Prince Rupert. Vancouver, and Victoria- The registrars supply 
information to those inquiring regarding entrj- in the force, arrange for medical 
examination, attestation and training of ratings and keep a complete record of 
men enlisted in their locality. Twenty-four officers (including nine registrars! 
and eighty-one men have been recruited and given training at Halifax or 
Esquimalt. Training for the R.C.N.R. is carried out during the winter months. 

It is expected that the force will be recruited up to full strength during the 
coming year. 



REPORT OF Till-: DRPITY MIXISTFR 15 

SE&SIONAL PAPER No. 17a 

6. XAVAI. STORES 

Tlic activities of the Naval Store? Biancli have been eontinued iinrier tlie 
^ame organization as has obtained in past years, viz., the Naval and Victual- 
linK Stores Division, ('(ymprisinf; the Supply Depots at the Dockyards, and the 
Na\'al Armament Supply Division, likewise comjirising the Naval Armament 
Supply Depots at Halifax and Esquimalt. 

The supply work of the branch is organized solely for the supply and 
uiuipment of men-of-war and all auxiliary services with every possible expedi- 
tion and to render the maximum assistance required for their efficient mainten- 
ance. The organization, though now on a peace-time basis, is such that in any 
emergency all existing facilities are capable of expansion and development at 
short notice to provide for whatever requirements may arise. The trained per- 
sonnel and storing facilities at tiie Dockyards and Armament Supply Depots 
are adeciuate for present requirements, in addition to which they constitute a 
nucleus for an emergency. 

There has been a marked increase in the activities of the branch during 
the year due to the equipping of the R.C'.N.V.R. personnel witli uniforms and 
the company headquarters at the various centres with naval and naval arma- 
ment stores necessary for the training of the volunteers and the operation of 
the units in gemral. Ii; arldition uniforms have been provided for the R.C'.N.R. 
ratings enlisted to date. 

In continuing the policy of (lisi)osing of all vessels not required by the 
department, sale was made during the year of the Canada, the only vessel which 
remained on the disposal list from the previous year. 

NAVAL AND VK TUALI.ING .STOUKS DIVI.SION 

The functions of this division have remained unchanged, embracing as in 
past years all phases of naval supply work as regards naval and victualling 
stores. 

During the past year supplies of stores were arranged for vessels of the 
Canadian Naval Service and for all other naval establishments. The greatest 
possible economy was exercised in this by the transfer of stores between dock- 
yards and by shipment to other points as necessary. Service was also rendered 
to the Imperial Naval Service and to vessels of other Government departments. 
Supply depots are maintained at both Halifax and Esquimalt Dockyards. 
These are in charge of experienced store officers, who super\'ise the work and 
who are responsible to the Director of Naval Stores for the performance of the 
duties allotted to them. They must be prepared at all times to provide and 
issue supplies of whatever nature required to all ships and establishments under 
the jurisdiction of the department and to such others as may be approved; to 
make a strict and careful accounting of all such issues; and to see that all sup- 
plies purchased are in accordance with specifications and in other respects suit- 
able for the service. Tiie variety of stores iiandled is necessarily very exten- 
sive, and for men-of-war particularly excellence of quality anrl reliability are 
of the most vital importance. To this end standardization of supplies and a 
rigid system of inspection constitute two imjiortant factors of the supplies 
(.rganization. 

Tiie nature of t!ie service demands that substantial reserves be maintained 
at each naval base and kept readily available at all times. In time of peace, 
ships' reciuirements can be forecasted very accurately, tiieir allowances being 
carefully regulated. Ordinarily and within reasonable limits these reserves are 
bascfl upon six months" requirements for all purposes. Owing to the large stocks 
which were a\-ailable a* the end of the war, [imvision has been made in the ease 



16 XATIOS'AL DEFENCE (NAVAL SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

ot stores which are not of a perishable nature for reserves against the antici- 
pated requirements of tlic next five to ten years, depending upon the quanti- 
ties in stock and upon tiic extent of perishability. In the case again of certain 
other stores, likewise unperishable. further additional quantities have been 
retained to constitute a war reserve for the equipment of naval personnel 
enlisted during the first few months following the outbreak of war and to fit 
out the ships wiiich would at that time be placed in commission. At the close 
of the fiscal year 1923-24. the stocks at Halifax totalled in value SI .234.610.50, 
and at Esquimall .HST.a^G.SS. 

In addition to the stores a<'tually carried at the supply base, contracts are 
arrangeil and maintained at both ct)asts for the supply of fresh provisions, coal, 
ice, etc., for the convenience of ships operating in adjacent waters. These are 
made apijliiahie to, and are taken atlvantage of by. ships of the Imperial Ser- 
vice. 

A review of the stocks at the dockyards, particularly at Halifax, has been 
made with a view to disposing of all obsolete, unserviceable and surplus stores. 
Lists of these have been compiled and placed in the hands of the Government 
salvage officer for disposal. Satisfactory progress in this connection has been 
made. 

The volume of business transiict<Nl in 1923-24 at Ixith dockyartls is reflected 
in the following brief statistics: — 

N'unibcr 
transactions 

Halifax Dockyard — involved 

Value of stores received SIW. 3(iO 89 1.181 (orders) 

Value of stores returned :i. .306 62 890 

Value of stores issued .3-»7.48.3 54 .5.946 

Esquimau Dockyard — 

Value of stores received $126, 636 05 1 . 444 (orders) 

Value of stores returned 3.698 81 717 

\'aluo of stores issued 169.283 96 5,379 

Tiie overhead costs at the dockyards in connection with the supply of 
stores to fill ships and establishments for the year under review were 16 22 per 
cent at Halifax and 10 28 per cent at Esquimalt. These percentages embrace 
all costs of whatever nature incidental to the maintenance and operation of 
the supply bases, including also extensive repairs to certain of the storehouses. 

The audit of all stores accounts has been conducted with satisfactory 
results. Both dockyards and the ships and naval establishments uniler the 
department keep stores account*: jn which receipts and expenditures are fully 
recorded. These are audited at Naval Service Headquarters to see that all 
stores of whatever nature are properly accounted for, anil for the control of 
expenditures. In the case of the store accounts at the dockyards, the system 
of concurrent audit at heackiuartcrs has been continued with great success, 
serxing not only as an audit but also aft'ording information on stores matters 
at all times as an integral part of the system of stores control. 

The system of biennial stocktaking at both dockyards has been continued 
and good progre^s made. Under this system the stocks are completely reviewed 
in the cour^e of two years. The results on the whole are very gratifying and 
testify to the efiicient manner in which the stalTs conctrned perform their duties. 

The system of general messing whereby the complements of ships and 
establishments are ^^ctualled by the department direct has been continued, 
likewise with \'ery satisfactorj- result*. The essential features of the general 
messing system are direct control of the stewards, the supply of stores, pur- 
chased by contract and a particular Naval Service Heailquarters audit. This 
.system effects a considerable saving in the cost of victualling the ships of the 
department. During the past year the average cost of victualling was 49 
cents per man per iliem. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 17 

SESiSIONAL PAPER No. 17a 

NAVAL ARMAMENT SUPPLY DIVISION 

The functions of this division are in general terms the supervision and 
control of all matters pertaining to the provision, receipt, issue, care and 
maintenance, repair, testing, examination, accounting and audit of all Naval 
Armament stores in conncctiim with the Canadian Naval Service at botii 
Halifax and Escjuimalt. 

An agreement made with the British Admiralty to maintain sufficient 
reserves of ammunition for issue to H.M.C. ships on repayment as required 
has proved ver\- satisfactorj*. The st«rekecping of all Imperial stocks whether 
for ultimate issue to Imperial or Canadian services which is undertaken by 
the department in return for this accommodation by the Admiralty has been 
carried on to the mutual satisfaction of both serN-ices. 

The Imperial stocks at Halifax were recently inspected by the Admiralty 
Inspector of Ordnance Depots, who rendered a very favourable report on the 
condition of the stores. 

The stocks of Naval Armament stores at both Halifax and Esquimalt are 
maintained in an efficient manner and have been depleted of all obsolete and 
unserviceable stores. Where necessary these have been replaced by modem 
equipment and stores of the latest m;inufacture. 

The store accounts of both depots, as well as of H.M.C. ships and establish- 
ments, have been kept and rendered in a satisfactory manner. 

Certain Naval Armament stores not required for the Naval Service have 
been transferred to the Militia Services free of charge. The value of these 
stores amounted to $46,163. 

The following represents the value of the receipts and issues made on 
behalf of the Canadian Naval Senice during the year: — 

ReceipU at Halifax $188,035 00 

" Ksquimalt 254.5.38 00 

Issues " Halifax 467,528 00 

•• Esquimau 176,644 00 

A system of continuous stocktaking is carried on in such a way as to 
en.'iure that the complete stocks of Naval Armament stores both Imperial and 
Canadian are verified even,- year. Certificates of comparison of stock lists 
with ledger balances are rendered periodically. All discrepancies other than 
those of trinal nature, i.e., wTong nomenclature or obnous clerical error, are 
thoroughly investigated and the necessarj' adjustment made. The results of 
thc-se stocktakings have been very satisf acton,-. 

PURCHASES 

During the year the total value of Naval, Victualling and Armament 
stores purciiased on account of the Naval Scr\-ice for delivcn.- to the Dock- 
yards, Annament Supply Depots and to ser\'ices direct amounted to $429,101. 

7, GENERAL 

I ha\'e to express appreciation for the competent manner in which officers 
and men of the Royal Canadian Navy, Reserve Forces, and civilian employees 
of the Naval Sen-ice have performed their duties during the past year. 

The behaviour of the Naval ratings has been excmplan,- both at home 
and whilst ser\'ing on Ixjard Imperial ships and attending courses at Royal 
Naval Training Establishments, Commanding Officers of the R. N. ships have 
complimented the service on tlie efficiency and good behaviour of Naval Rat- 
ings coming under their command for training. 



18 XATIOXAL DEFENCE (NAVAL SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

The general health of the ser\'ice has been excellent. During the year all 
officers and men who scr\-ed during the war were examined to ascertain if they 
are suffering from disabilities attributable to war ser\nce. In practically all 
cases the men were found physically fit for the service. 

I have the honour to be Sir, 
Your obedient pcr\-ant. 

WALTER HOSE. 
Commodore R.C.N. , 
Director of Naval Service. 
REPORT OF CHIEF ACCOUNTANT 
The attached statement,? show an expenditure under various appropriations 
amounting to §1,405.090 and a revenue of $113,659.45. 

Refunds for the vcar on account of demobilization, previous vears amounts 
to $57,596.95. 

DEPARTMENT OF XATION'AI. DEFENXE (NAVAL SERVICE), 192.3-24 

Total Revenue of the Naval Service for fiscal year ended Nfarch 31 , 1924, $ 113, 6,59 45 
Demobilization refunds previous year 57,596 95 

f 171,256 40 . 

Net expenditure for the year on Naval Scr\-iee appropriations $ 1,405,090 59 

Value of work done and materials supplied for account of other Canadian 

Government department.<i, British Admiralt.v and others 401.356 98 

Gross disbursements for the year .% 1,806,447 57 

STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATION ACCOUNTS FOR THE FISCAL YR.\R 
1923-24 



Service 


Appropriation 


Expenditure 


Balance 
UDcxpendc<i 




t cts. 

1.500,000 00 

15,000 00 

500 00 

274,000 00 


$ cte 

1.3,54.527 00 

6,188 08 

91 56 

44,283 95 


t cts. 
145.473 00 


Pa.v of temporary clerks 


8.811 92 
408 44 


AdjustDient of war claims 


229.710 0,5 




1.789,500 00 


1.405,090 59 


384,409 41 



Imperial Government (Special Account) — 

Disbursements S 130. 477 74 

Carried from 1922-23 37.968 05 



Less — Reimbursement-s 

Transferred to 1924-2.5 



t 138.292 59 
30, 153 20 



-$ 168,445 79 



STATK.MENT OF REVENUE FOR FI.SCAL VEAK ENDED MARCH 31. 1924 

Casual revenue t 110. 8.30 24 

Miscellaneous revenue 2,551 55 

Premium, discount and exchan^ 152 66 

Fines and forfeitures 1 25 00 



Dcmobilixation, prcvi 



$ 113,659 45 
57.596 95 



KEPOirr OF THE DEI'LTV Ml.MSTElt 19 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 17a 

SUSPKNS1;A( COINTS— SHdWlNC VAIAKOKWORK DONE AND MATERIAL SUI'I'LIKD 
KOR ACCOUNT OF OTHKR CANADIAN GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS. URITISH 
ADMIRALTY AND OTHERS 



British Admiralty 

Hritish Ministry of Shipping 

Imperiiil (lovi-rnmont Naval Prize Fund 

Canadiiin Cliivprnmcnt Merchant Marine 

Canadian National Railways 

Depart tiiont of Customs 

Department of Health 

Department of the Interior 

Department of Justice 

Department of Marine and Fisheries 

Department of National Defence — 

Militia Service 

Air Ser\"iee 

Department of Public Works 

Department of R.C.M.P 

Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishinent 

Unitcil States Coverninent 

Miscellaneous 



• cts 

99.899 44 
5,876 80 

62.669 .55 
810 51 
.367 80 
2,827 13 
2,475 29 
1,740 70 
3,059 49 

29,113 55 

5,726 23 

333 71 

1,120 23 

1,116 69 

945 00 

128 75 

183.146 11 

401,356 98 



102,788 31 



35,. 504 28 

787 56 

330 90 

2,818 03 

2, .356 29 

1,507 06 

3,052 .56 

26,666 00 

5.638 43 
297 71 
765 84 
747 05 
909 00 
79 13 
189,478 67 

373,726 82 



Transferred Not 

to 1924-25 Transferred 



t cts. 

Cr. 2,888 87 

5,876 80 

27, 165 27 

22 95 

36 90 

9 10 

119 00 

233 64 

6 93 

2,447 55 

87 80 
36 00 
354 39 
369 64 
36 00 
49 62 
Cr. 7,519 97 

26,442 75 



NATIONAL DEFENCE (NAVAL SERVICE) 

15 GEORGE V. 



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DOMINION OF CANADA 

REPORT OF THE WORK 

OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF 

SOLDIERS' 
CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 
1924 

PRISTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMEST 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST BJCCELLENT MAJESTY 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 A. 1925 



To General His Excellency the Right Honourable Lord Byng of Viyny, G.C.B., 
G.C.M.G., M.V.O., Governor General and Commander in Chief of the 
Dominion of Canada. 

May it Please Your Excellency: 

The undersigned has the honour to present to Your Excellency the Annual 
Report of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment for the calendar 
year ended December 31, 1924. 

I have the honour to be 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

HENRI S. BELAND, 
Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment. 

February 1, 1925. 



81103— a) 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 



THE DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

Ihad Offic. Daly Buiiaing, Ottawa. 

MiMSTKR — The Honourable Henri S. Beland, M.U. 

Deputy Minister — N. F. Parkinson, M.Sc. 

AssisT.^NT Deputy Minister .and Secretary — E. H. Scaiuinell, F.C.I5. 

Director of Administr.ation — F.. Flexman, D.S.O. 

Director ok Medic.m. Services — W. C. Arnold, M.D. 

Director of Dent.al Services — R. B. O'Sullivan, DJD.S., OJiJE. 

Overseas Rephesent.\ti\'e — C. V>. .\rthur. DS.O. 

District Offices — 

" A '■ Unit. Province of Quebec — 

Head Office, Ames-Holden Building. Montreal, P.Q. 

Branch Office, Merger Building. (Quebec. P.Q. (Medical Clinic only). 

"B" Unit, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island — 
Head Office, Camp Hill Ho.spital, Halifax, N.S. 
Branch Office, The Cottage, Lancaster Hospital, St. .John, N.B. 

"C" Unit. Eastern Ontario — 

Head Office. 1st Floor, Daly BIdg., Ottawa. Ont. 
Branch Office, Post Office Bldg.. Kingston, Ont. 

" D " and '' F " Unita. Central and Western Ontario — 
Head Office. Christie Street Hospitiil, Toronto, Ont. 

Branch Office. .Sanford Building. 4,3 Catharine Street South, Hamilton, Ont. 
Branch Office. Brcner Building, 181 Horton Street, London, Ont. 

"G" Unit. Manitoba — 

Head Office. 604 Canada Bldg., Winnipeg, Man. 

Branch Office, Customs Excise Warehouse. Port Arthur, Ont. 

" H " Unit. Saskatchewan — 

Head Office, Veteran Block, Regina, Sask. 
Branch Office. Canada Building. Saskatoon. Sask. 

" I " Unit, .\lberta— 

Head Office. 523 Eighth Avenue West. Calgarj-. Alta. 

Branch Office, Strathcona Post Office. South Side. Edmonton. Alta. 

".I" Unit, British Columbia — 

Head Office. Shaughnessy Hospital, Vancouver, B.C. 
Branch Office. Post Office Building. Victoria. B.C. 

Overseas Office— \03 Oxford Street, London, W.. England. 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 



CONTENTS 

Pace 

Accounts — method of presentation x 

Accounts Division 29-41 

Accounts receivable 39 

Appropriations by fiscal years, 1919-25 41 

Appropriations for 1923-24 32 

Current Assets by Provinces 39 

Distribution of Vocational Loans ^9 

Government Department transfers 30 

Net disbursements on pensions, 1916-24 38 

Net disbursements on re-establishment, 1915-24 3S 

Railway transportation and freight 40 

Statements of Income and Expenditures .31-37 

Summan,' of Financial Statement 31 

Addresses of Departmental Offices v 

Administration Bhancii 11-27,29-42 

Accounts Division 29-41 

Assistance to return to British Isles 20 

Blind, training and care of 15-10 

Chaplain services 20 

Employment 13 

Engineering Division 24-25 

Equipment Section 27 

Foreign Relations Section 21 

Imperial Pensions Division 22-23 

Investigation Section 21 

Orthopa-dic rind Surgical Appliances 18-20 

Pay and Personal Services Division 2tl 

Purchasing and Stores Division 25-27 

Records and Central Registry Division 25 

Relief 13-15 

Returned Soldiers' Insurance 17-lS 

Sheltered Emplovmcnt 16-17 

Staff : 1! 

Vocational Loans 11-12,30 

Vocational Training 11 

Vocational Training in Civil Service 12 

War Service Gratuity payments 21 

Administration Costs xi 

Admissions, discharges and deaths 1-3 

Amendments to Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment Act \ 

Assistance to return to British Isles 20 

Blind, training and care of 15-16 

Central Registry and Records 25 

Chaplain Services 20 

Chart, Pensions Statistics 4:! 

Civil Service, training in ''5 

Clinical treatments 1 

Dental Services 10 

Dietetics 9-10 

Disablement Fund 42 

Engineering Division 24-25 

Equipment 27 

Farm and Garden Operations 25 

Federal Appeal Board Regulations 44-46 

vi 



Paow 

Fire Protection 24 

Foreiiin Relations Section 4-5,21 

Fuel Supply -'4 

Hospitiils, Mental 3 

Hospitals operated by Department 2 

Hospitals used by Department 2-3 

Imperials on treatment 4, 5 

Imperial Pensions Division 22-23 

Indigent Pensioners Appendix II x 

Insurance 17-18 

Introductory Letter ix 

Investigation Section 21 

Laundrj' operations 24 

Maintenance and repairs 24 

Mechanical transport 2-1 

Medical Stores 9 

Neuropsj'chiatrie Service 7-9 

Old Soldiers (Appendix II) x 

Order in Council PC. 212 (Appendix I) 44-46 

Order in Council PC. 1653 (Appendix II) 46-47 

Order in Council P.C. 2161 (Appendix III) 47-18 

Orthopadic and Surgical Appliances 18-20 

Patient Strength ix, 3 

Pay and Personal Services Division 20 

Pension Medical Examinations 4 

Pensions Statistics, Chart 43 

Purchasing and Stores 25 

Records and Central Registry 25 

Rehabilitation Committee of Toronto 27-29 

Relief x, 13-15 

Rentals 24 

Returned Soldiers' Insurance 17-18 

Sanatoria 2-3 

Sheltered Employment x, 16-17 

Staff ' 42 

Staff, Administration Branch U 

Stores and Purchasing 25-27 

Transfers to Government Departments 26-39 

Treatment Branch 1-10 

Admissions, discharges, deaths and total patient strength 1,3 

Admissions to hospital, 1915-24 1 

Clinical treatments, 1919-24 1 

Dental services 10 

Dietetics 9-10 

Foreign Relations Section 4-5 

Hospitals operated by Department 2 

Hospitals used by Department 2-3 

Imperials on treatment 4,5 

Medical Stores 9 

Mental Hospitals, provincial 3 

Neuropsjxhiatric service 7-9 

Pension medical examinations 4 

Sanatoria 1,2,3 

Tuberculosis, treatment of 5-7 

Tuberculosis, treatment of 5-7 

vii 



1 



Paos 

Unemployment Relief 13-15 

Vocational Loaas 1 l-li;, 39 

Vocational Training 1 1 

Vocational Training in Civil Service 12 

War Service Gratuity Payments 21 

Workmen's Compensation Insurance x 

APPENDICES 

1. Order in Council P.C. 212, dated the 8th February 1924. Rules and regulations 

of the Federal Appeal Board 44^6 

II. Order in Council P.C. 1653, dated the 18th September, 1924. Authority under 
which the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment may provide 
quarters and maintenance for indigent pensioners 46— JO 

III. Order in Council P.C. 2161, dated tht- 18th December, 1924. Authority under 
which the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment may receive 
mones'S, etc., on behalf of ex-members of the Forces and may assume 
guardianship in certain cases 47-4S 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 



INTRODUCTORY LETTER 

TO REPORT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

The Hon. H. S. Belaxd, M.D., M.P., 

Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — In accordance with your instructions I have the honour to submit the 
attached report of the work of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establish- 
ment for the calendar j-ear 1924. During the year the Sir Oliver Mowat 
Sanatorium, Kingston, has been turned over to the Kingston Health Asso- 
ciation and the departmental patients in that institution are now under the 
care of the association, the cost of their treatment being paid by the department. 
The department continues to operate nine hospitals with a total bed capacity 
of 2,647. 

2. The number of patients undergoing treatment has continued to decrease 
but at a far less ratio than formerly. The following statement shows the nimiber 
of in-patients and out-patients at the end of 1921, 1922, 1923 and 1924:— 

In-patients Out-patients Total 

1921 5,053 287 5,340 

1922 4,014 293 4,307 

1923 3,619 125 3.744 

1924 3,347 80 3,427 

It may be expected that there will be ver>- little reduction for some years 
to come and there may in some departments be an increase. Several factors 
are operating towards the maintenance of patient numbers such as increasing 
age, complication of war disabilities by those common to civilian life and lapse 
of time, meaning in many cases progress of disease and steady deterioration of 
health. These factors will as time goes on demand longer in-patient treatment 
and consequently with the constant re-admission, a maintenance of patient 
strength. This has already been the experience of the department of the Aus- 
tralian Government which conducts similar work to that of the Department of 
Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment. The in-patient strength at June 30, 1921, 1922, 
1923, and 1924 was as follows:— 

1921 2,346 

1922 2,258 

1923 1,975 

1924 1,714 

Clinical treatments are less numerous than formerly. There was a reduction 
of approximately 84.000 in 1922, a further 50,000 in 1923 and a further 20,000 
in 1924. Here again it will be seen that the reduction is becoming less marked. 

On the other hand, due to the very careful business methods employed it 
has been possible to continue a considerable reduction in the number of the 
staff. The figure at December 31, 1924 was 2,524, a decrease of 570 during the 
year. In view of the permanent nature of most of the hospitals now operated 
by the department and the fact that a considerable proportion of the staff is' 

ix 

90102— B 



X DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMEXT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

employed in these hospitals there is unlikely to be a material further reduction 
for some time to come. 

At the last session of Parliament two amendments were made to the 
Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment Act, one dealing with the classi- 
fication and control of the staff and the other empowering the department to 
receive and hold moneys belonging to ex-members of the forces who have 
received treatment, particularly those suffering from mental diseases. This 
authority was implemented by Order in Council P.C. 2161 (appendix No. III). 

The operation of the autiiority under wliich the department may assume 
responsibility for Workmen's Compensation in the case of pensioner? of 20 per 
cent and upwards is becoming more generally known and appreciated and is 
resulting in the more settled employment of disabled men. In consequence the 
appropriation of $30,000 made last year has been expended and it will be 
necessary to secure a supplementary vote in order to meet the claims already in 
hand and others which will be received prior to the end of the fiscal year. 

It has unfortunately been necessary for the department to continue a certain 
measure of relief to pensioners. Particulars of the expenditures in this con- 
nection are set forth in the report. Relief is in no instance issued in cash but 
always by orders on landlords, grocers, coal dealers, etc. and the accounts are 
paid direct to these persons. A supplementary vote to meet the extra expendi- 
ture involved in this connection will be submitted. 

The sheltered employment workshops, both those operated by the depart- 
ment and those operated by the various branches of the Red Cross, continue 
to ser\'e a useful purpose. Numbers of men who otherwise would be unemploy- 
able are provided with remunerative occupation at a cost a good deal less than 
would be incurred if they were carried on relief, which without these workshops 
would be necessary. As soon as it is proved that a man is able to work 
regularly and satisfactorily every effort is made to find him employment in some 
industrial plant. 

A report is included from the Toronto Rehabilitation Committee. This 
committee was formed in order to assist those who have not yet found their 
niche in the fabric of industrj' to procure employment at a fair cost of the 
employer and a minimum cost to the Federal Government. While the cost of 
operation has been somewhat high it will be noted that 162 men have been 
placed permanently since the commencement of the activities of the Committee. 

No decrease is shown in the amount of expenditure on pensions, in fact 
there has been an increase this year and it will be necessarj' to ask Parliament 
for a supplementary vote in this regard. 

Special attention is called to appendix II, setting forth Order in Council 
P.C. 1653, under which the department has been authorized to pro\ide quarters 
and maintenance for indigent pensioners. As time goes on it will probably 
be necessary to make still further provision for the maintenance of men who 
served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force who tiirough increasing age and 
the development of disabilities in civilian life, superimposed on service dis- 
abilities, are thereby rendered unable to secure ordinary- employment. Under 
the authority of this Order in Council certain section? of departmental hospitals 
have been set aside for present and early future requirements. This will entail 
increased expenditure during the next fiscal year, notwithstanding the fact that 
the benefits are confined to pensioners of 20 per cent and upwards. Each year 
the number of those making application for board and quarters will doubtless 
materially increase. 

A change lias been made in the method of presentation of the annual 
financial stiitement of the department. In order that the exact situation may 
be seen the accounts have been made up to the end of the last fiscal year instead 
of the end of the calendar year which has been the previous practice. A general 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924 xi 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

financial statement is given whicli is divided into sections, eacii of whicli covers 
a particular activity of the department. It will be seen that the amounts set 
forth on the income side correspond with the appropriations voted by Parliament 
plus moneys received from other sources. On the expenditure side the authority 
for each general item is given. The total expenditure for the year was 
$51,541,824.82. This is divided as follows:— 

Direct payments to men and dependents in cash consisting 

of pensions, pay and allowances, relief, etc $41,.570,221 93 

Payments for services to men and dependents including 
hospital treatment, orthopxdic appliances, trau.s|)or- 
tation of patients and pensioners, funeral expenses and 
sheltered employment under the control of depart- 
ment and employers' liability compensation 5,648,188 40 

Payments to outside organizations not under the direct 
control of the department such as the Last Post Fund, 
Canadian Red Cross for sheltered employment, Royal 
Commission on Pensions and Re-establishment and 
Federal Appeal Board 238,425 88 

Capital expenditure 6,120 54 

Recoverable expenditure and casual revenue 1,593,222 90 

Total payments apart from administration $49,056,179 65 

Administration, including .salaries, telephones, telegrams, 

transportation, stationery, rent, light, heat, etc., etc.. . 2.485.645 17 

$51,541,824 82 

Tn order to assess the cost of administration again>t the work done by the 
department it is neccssaiy to add to the foregoing figure of total expenditure the 
amount of $1,574,627.43, representing the premiums collected under the Returned 
Soldiers' Insurance Act. A considerable staff is maintained by the department 
for this purpose. With this item included the cost of administration amounts to 
4.679 per cent. On the other hand the Board of Pension Commissioners, which 
is a separate entity from the department, expended during the last fiscal year 
$97,523.44, which amount .should be considered in arriving at the percentage of 
cost of administration. If this be added the percentage is increased to 4.863, 
which it is submitted is an exceedingly creditable showing in view of the services 
which the department is called upon to render. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



N. F. PARKINSON, 

Deputy Minister. 



Ottaw.a, January 31, 1925. 



i 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 



REPORT OF THE TREATMENT BRANCH, MEDICAL DIVISION 
FOR THE YEAR 1924 



During the year 1924, the Sir Oliver Mowat Memorial Sanatorium, at 
Kingston, Ont., was turned over to tlie Kingston Health Association, leaving nine 
institutions, with a bed capacity of 2,647, under the direct control of the depart- 
ment. 

On December 31. 1924, there were on the strength of the department 3,427 
treatment cases, distributed as follows: — 

In Canada 3,105 

In C.rcat Uritain 101 

In the United States 221 

In addition there were 123 civilian cases, making a total treatment strength 
of 3.550. 

Of the 3,105 cases in Canada, 3,045 were in institutions, and the number of 
out-patients totally incapacitated was 60. 

The patients were classified as follows: — 

Canada Great Britain United States Total 

General (medical and surgical) 1,474 .53 109 1,636 



Tuberculous (sanatorium cases) 691 14 8S 793 

Mental 940 



Great Britain 


United States 


.53 
14 
34 


109 
24 



Total 3,105 



The following figures give the approximate number of admissions to hospital 
bv tlie Militarv Hospitals Commission and the department to December 31, 
1924:— 

July 1, 191.5. to December 31, 1916, byMilitary HospitalsCommission, 

approximately 22.742 

Janu.ir>- 1. 1917 to March 31. 1918 28,258 

April 1. 191S to December 31, 1919 by D.S.C.R 36,625 

.January 1, 1920 to December 31, 1920 23,. 591 

January 1, 1921 to December 31, 1921 I3.S90 

.January 1, 1912 to December 31, 1922 10,015 

January 1, 1923 to December 31, 1923 8,516 

Januarj' 1, 1924 to December 31, 1924 8.234 

Total 151, 871 

Clinical Treatments 

May 1, 1919 to December 31. 1919 by D.S.C.R 126.057 

January 1, 1920 to December 31. 1920 447,142 

January 1, 1921 to December 31, 1921 300.895 

January 1, 1922 to December 31, 1922 216.991 

January 1. 1923 to December 31. 1923 167.291 

Januar>- 1, 1924 to December 31, 1924 147.675 

Total 1.406.a51 



The number of pension medical examinations carried out in Canada during the year was 34.018 
S1102— 13— 1 • 



DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 george v, a. 1925 

Institutions Operated by the Department 
general treatment hospitals 



Name 



Total 
number 

of 
Patient 

Beds 



Stc. Anne's Hospital (General Service) 

Camp Hill Hospital 

Lancaster Hospital 

Christie St. Hospital 

Deer Lodge Convalescent Hospital 

Colonel Belcher Hospital 

Shaughnessy Hospital 



Ste. Anne de Belle\-uc. Que 
Jubilee Road, Halifax, N.S 

St. John. X.B 

Toronto, Ont 

Winnipeg, Man 

Calgary Alta 

Vancouver, B.C 



225 
200 
100 
545 
64 
128 
304 



T. B. SANATORIUM 



NEUROPSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALS 



Ste. Anne's Hospital (Neuropsychiatric 

Service) 

Westminster Hospital 



Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Que 
London, Ont 

Total 



400 
500 



Institutions where the Department has Arrangements for 
Accommodation 

general treatment hospit.\ls 



Royal Victoria Hospital. 
Mount Royal Hospital. . . 

General Hospital 

Jeffrey H:ilo Hospital 

General Hospital 

H6tel Dieu Hospital 

Ottawa Civic Hospital... 

St. Joseph's Hospital 

H6tcl Dieu 

Victoria Hospital 

Port Arthur Hospital 

General Hospital 

St. Boniface Hospital 

General Hospital 

General Hospital 

Grey Xun's Hospital 

General Hospital 

Providence Hospital 

Citv Hospital 

St. Paul's Hospital 

University Hospital 

Banff Sanatorium 

General } lospital 

Royal Inland Hospital... 
Kootenay Lake Hospital 

Colquitz Hospital 

Jubilee Hospital 

St. Joseph's Hospital 



Montreal, Que. 
Montreal, Que. 
Montreal, Que. 
Quebec, Que. 
Kingston, Ont. 
Kingston, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Hamilton, Ont. 
Windsor, Ont. 
London. ( >nt. 
Port .\rtJiur. Ont. 
Winnipeg. Man. 
St. Boniface, Man. 
Brandon, Man. 
Regina. Sask. 
Regina. Sask. 
Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Banff, Alta. 
\'ancouver, B.C. 
Kamloops, B.C. 
Kelson. B.C. 
Colquitt, B.C. 
Victoria, B.C. 
Victoria. B.C. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 



ANNUAL REPORT, J92i 



T. B. SANATORIA 



Unit 


Name 


Place 


A 




Ste. Agatlie des Monts, 

Que. 
River Olade. N.B. 


B 














St. John, N.R. 


C 






D 




Hamilton, (Jnt. 














F 












G 




Winnipeg, Man. 






H 




Fort Qu'Appelle, Sask. 
Trantiuille, B.C. 


J 









MENTAL HOSPITALS 



St. Michel de Bcauport Hospital 
St; Jean de Dieu Hospital 

Nova Scotia Hospital 

Falcon wood Hospital 

Ontario Hospital 

Ontario Hospital 

Ontario Hospital 

Ontario Hospital 

Ontario Hospital 

Winnipeg I'sychopathic Hospital 

Selkirk, Ho.spital 

Provincial Mental Hospital 

Provincial Mental Hospital 

Provincial Mental Hospital 

Provincial .Mental Hospital 

Provincial Mental Hospital 

Provincial Mental Hospital 

Provincial Mental Hospital 



Beauport, Que. 
LonRuePointe, Montreal 

Que. 
Dartmouth, N.S. 
Charlottetown, P.E.I. 
KinRston, Ont. 
Brock ville, Ont. 
Mimieo, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Whitby, Ont. 
W'innipeg, Man. 
Selkirk, Man. 
Battleford, Sask. 
Weyburn, Sask. 
Red Deer, .\lta. 
Ponoka, Alta. 
Essondale, B.C. 
New Westminster, B.C. 
Saanich, B.C. 



ADMISSIONS, DISCHARGES, DF_\THS, AND TOTAL PATIENT STRENGTH FOR THE 

YEAR, 1924 



Total on strength December 31st. 1923. 
Total on strength December 31st, 1924. 



3.744 
3.427 



Months 


Admis- 
sions 


Dis- 
charges 


Deaths 


Strength 




1,011 
733 
717 
747 
543 
569 
669 
538 
7(M 
645 
673 
685 


787 
701 
788 
938 
698 
587 
770 
518 
754 
553 
537 
551 


48 
21 
26 
47 
34 
33 
28 
22 
33 
24 
21 
32 


3,920 
3,931 




March 


3.834 
3,596 
3,407 
3 356 


April 


May :.:::::::;::::;::::::::::: :::"::::::;::::' 


June 


July 


3,227 
3.225 
3 142 


August 




October 


3,210 




3.325 


December 


3 427 






Totals 


8,234 


8.182 


369 









91I02— 18-11 



DEPARTMEXT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISH M EST 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

PENSION MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS 1-1-24 to 31-12-24 



Unit 


C.E.F. 


Imperials 


Others 


Total 


A 


2,342 
2.109 
3,022 
5,138 
3,062 
3.658 
2.917 
3.592 
3.444 
1.070 
1.794 
3,109 


259 
66 
98 
1.044 
404 
388 
301 
339 
.'525 
25 


33 
24 

1 
62 
19 
10 
22 
23 

9 
12 


2,634 


B 


2,199 


C 


3,121 


D 


6,244 


F 


3,485 


G 


4.056 


H 


3.240 


I 


3.954 


J 


3 978 


K 


1,107 


M 


1,794 


U 


2.. 561 


52 


5,722 






Total 


35.257 


6,010 


267 


41,534 







Summarj': — 

Canada. 
British Isles. 
United States. 



34,018 
1,794 
5.722 

41,534 



FOREIGN RELATIONS SECTION 

From Januarj' 1 — December 31, 1924 

The following i.« a comparative statement showing the numbers of pension 
examinations requested and reports received dm-ing 1924: — 





Requested 


Received 


(I) Ex-membeia of the Canadian forces— 


1,509 

87 

2,351 

2,047 

21 
41 

11 

47 

220 

15 


1.703 




91 




3.109 




2.561 


(III) " " Australian forces — 


10 




48 


(IV) Ex-members of the New Zealand forces — 


8 


(b) " the United States 


4 




45 




162 




13 








6.356 


7.755 



The difference in number between the reports on ex-members of the Allied 
forces requested and received is explained by the fact that in many cases 
examinations are cancelled before the report is received and, in the case of the 
ex-members of the United Stiitcs forces, several returned to the United States 
before being examined. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 



STATEMENT OF PATIENTS AS ON DECEMBER 31, 1924 

CANADIANS IN THE UNITED STATES 

In-patients on pay anci allowances 129 

In-patients on treatment only, including mental 6 

Out-patients on pay anil allowances 8 

143 

EX-IMPERLA.LS IN THE UNITED STATES 

In-patients on pay and allowances 69 

In-patients on treatment only '. 3 

Out-patients on pay and allowances 3 

New Zealandcrs and Australians 3 

78 

Total on strength in United States 221 

CANADIANS IN THE UNITED STATES 

Discharged from hospital 491 

Cases treated as out-patients 75 

Died 20 

586 

IMPERLA-LS IN THE UNITED STATES 

Discharged from hospital 289 

Cases treated as out-patients 33 

Died 10 

332 

918 



STATEMENT OF EX-MEMBERS OF THE ALLIED FORCES TREATED IN CANADA 
DURING THE YE.\R 1924 



Force 


On Strength 

Jan. 1, 

1924 


Admissions 


Discharges 


Deaths 


On Strength 

Dee. 31, 

1924 




1 


4 

4 
8 
2 
23 


4 
21 




1 




1 


3 




I 












10 




12 








Totol 


13 


41 


36 


1 


17 







TUBERCULOSIS 

The work of the department during the year 1924 in so far as tuberculosis 
is concerned is outlined in the tables below. 

During the year the Sir Oliver Mowat Sanatorium at Kingston has reverted 
to the control of the Kingston Health Association, leaving only one institution. 
the Central Alberta Sanatorium at Robertson, near Calgary, under departmental 
operation and control. Patients are receiving treatment in provincial and other 
institutions in all provinces where these exist. 

Table 1 shows that admissions have decreased by 224, deaths by 15, and the 
average number on strength monthlv bv 206 during the year 1924 as compared 
with 1923. 

Table 2 shows only 276 new cases of tuberculosis accepted for treatment 
during 1924, a decrease of 133 over the preceding year, while table 4 shows that 
one-third of those in hospital on December 31 were receiving treatment for the 
first time. 



6 DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Although table 1 shows an average of 839 patients on strength during each 
month in the year, table 3 shows that of this number an average of 75 were 
receiving treatment without full pay and allowances. 

Table 5 is compiled from available data and, as in former reports, is to be 
considered as only approximately correct. 

TABLE 1.— Number or TuBERCuions Ex-Sebvice Patients Admitted, Died, Disch.«ged .vnd 
Remaining on Strength during the Year, 1924 



Admis- 
sions 



Dis- 
charges 



Transfets 
oB 



Strength 



On Strength, December 31, 1923. 

.Iiinuary 

Februarj' 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



Totals. 



125 
90 
"74 
97 
70 
100 
101 
121 
108 



123 
104 
120 
131 
120 



111 
93 
73 
76 



958 
961 
957 
936 
929 
881 
825 
771 
762 
740 
733 
776 
793 



Average on strength at end of each month — 839 



-Ex-Service Men Taken on Strength for Treatment tor Tubercilo.sis during 1924, 
analysed as Primary Admissions and Re-Admissions 



Primary 
Admissions 



As 

Rc-.\dmis- 

sions 



Total 
Admissiona 



Januarj' 

February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

AugUBt 

September. 

October 

Novem ber . 
December. . 



Percentage. 



23-97% 



122 
91 
71 
95 
74 
64 
77 
51 
77 
79 
93 



138 
127 



103 
80 

107 
98 

121 

112 



•Admissions as per Table 1... 
Transfers on as per Table 1. 



Transfers ofl as per Table 1. 
Total admissions 



1.2.56 
51 


1,307 
18 



ANNUAL REPORT, im 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

TABLE 3. — Number of TuBEnctiLOcs Ex-Service Patients ADMrrTED, Discharoed, Died and 
Remaikikq on Strength durino Year 1924, Treatment only 



Discharges 



Transfers 

to other 

Treatment 

or P. and A. 



Strength 



Strength December 31, 1923. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



Total. 



TABLE 4. — Ex-SER\acE Men on Strength fob Treatment for Tuberculosis on December 31, 1924, 
Analysed According to Years in which Admitted or Re-Admitted 



Year in which taken on strength 


As 

Primary 

Admissions 


Aa 
Re- 
Admissions 


Totals 


1918 (After April 1) 


5 
20 
14 
12 
36 
63 
113 




6 


1919 


1 
9 
17 
30 
97 
376 


21 


1920 


23 


1921 


29 


1922 


66 


1923 




1924 


489 






Total on strength December 31, 1924 


263 
33-16% 


530 

66-84% 


793 


Percentage 


100% 



TABLE 5. — Computed Number of Ex-Service Men Takin on Strength for Treatment for Tuber- 
culosis Previous to December 31, 1924, and of those still Au-ve on that Date 

Patients taken on strength for treatment for Tuberculosis to December 

31. 1924 11,016 

Tuberculosispatientsstruck off strength by death to December 31, 1924 1,848 

Tuberculosis patients who died as pensioners not on treatment strength 

to December 31, 1924 450 

Total patients taken on strength for treatment for tuberculosis, who 

died as pensioners or as patients, to December 31, 1924 2,298 



Total patients taken on strength for treatment for tuberculosis and who 
were still alive December 31, 1924 



8,718 



NEUROPSYCHIATRIC SERVICE 

TABLE No. 1. — Number of Neuropsvchiatric Cases Reported Since Beoinnino of War unto. 

December 31, 1924 

Neuroses 6,740 

Psychoses and defect 3, 778 

Epilepsy 829 

Head injurj- 1,293 

Organic-neurological (iocluding peripheral) 982 

Alcoholics, drug habitues, undesirables 357 

13,977 



DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 
TAULE 2. — Admissions Departmental NErKOPSYCBXATHic Hospitals, 1924 



Westminster 



Voluntary 



Commit- 
ment 



Ste. Anne's 



Voluntary 



Commit' 
ment 



January . . 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

Juno 

July 

August. 

September 

October.. 

November 

December 



Percent, 89-7 



Per cent, 97-8 



Voluntary, both hospitals Per cent . 



T.XRLE 3.— Discharges Departmental Necropsychiatric HosprrAU", 1924 





Westminster 


Ste. Anne's 


— 


Re- 

rovered 
I mproved 


Unim- 
proved 


Died 


Total 


Ro- 

cov.red 
Improved 


Unim- 
proved 


Died 


Total 


January 

February 


6 
3 

11 

6 
(I 
5 

4 
4 
3 


4 
3 
4 
3 
4 
5 
3 
3 
2 
2 
1 


1 

1 
h 

1 

2 
1 

1 



10 

8 
11 
20 
17 
11 
14 
10 

9 

4 


13 
12 
9 
8 
15 
11 
11 
5 
8 
11 
4 
5 


1 
1 
5 

1 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 




3 




1 

1 



1 

I 


17 
13 
14 


April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 


8 
16 
13 
12 

9 
10 
12 


November 


5 
6 






Totals 


75 


36 


17 


128 


112 


16 


7 


135 



TABI^ 4— I)l\ono8Ks, All Cases in I{e8id£XCE Moxthlv. dcrino 1924. We 



NSTER UOSPHAL 



— 


Jan. 


Fob. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Au(. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 




32 
30 
24 
262 
36 
1 
3 

39 

42- 


34 
30 
24 
272 
38 
1 
2 

35 


32 
29 
24 
270 
38 
1 
2 

37 


32 
30 
23 
272 
38 
1 
2 

28 


32 
26 
24 
2-0 
38 
I 
2 

32 


32 
26 
23 
273 
38 
1 



28 


31 
25 
25 
279 
31 
1 
1 

29 


27 
24 
26 
280 
41 
I 


24 


30 
25 
25 
275 
41 

1 

24 


28 

24 
282 

38 

2 


27 


28 
26 
25 
282 
41 

2 

25 


30 




27 




25 




281 




40 




1 




2 









27 






Totals 


436 


433 


426 


425 


422 


422 


424 


421 


428 


429 


433 







ANNUAL REPORT, 1924 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

TABLE 5. — DuoNosEB, All Cases in Hesidencb Monthly, dubino 1924, Ste. Anne's Hospital 



— 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Deo. 




19 
9 

13 
22S 

21 
G 
1 


26 


18 
9 

12 
224 

20 
5 
1 


21 


20 
7 

10 
220 
1 
S 
1 


36 


19 
6 
11 

319 

4 



38 


18 
S 
7 

219 
1 
4 



48 


16 
6 
7 
215 
3 
5 


46 


13 

6 
7 

" 2 
5 


45 


12 
6 
7 
220 
1 
5 


.1 


11 
5 

7 
218 
1 
5 


51 


14 
9 
7 
216 
2 
5 


49 


14 
9 
7 
217 
2 
5 


54 


14 




9 




7 








2 




5 













53 






Totals . . 


319 


311 


300 


298 


302 


298 


295 


294 


298 


302 


308 


309 







TABLE 6. — Percen'tage of All ix-Patients OrcrpiED, 1924 





West- 
minster 


Ste. 
Anne's 




p.c. 

78 
77 
80 
79 
77 
79 
72 
80 
86 
87 
82 
81 


p.c. 

61 




57 


March 


73 


April 




74 


Mnv 




75 






75 


July.. 




75 




75 


September 

October 

November 

December 




76 
76 
75 
75 




79-8 


72-25 









REPORT OF MEDICAL STORES SECTION FOR THE YEAR 1924 

The department has continued the policy of centralized purcha.sing and dis- 
tribution of medical and surgical supplies as outlined in previous annual reports. 

The following statement summarizes the operations of Medical Stores for 
the twelve-month period ending December 31, 1924: — 

Total value ot stock on hand December .31, 1923 $24, .502 16 

Total value of goods received during period 73, 421 08 

Total value of goods issued during period 80,548 S3 

Total value of stock on hand in stores as at December 31 . 1924 . 17,374 41 



DIETETICS 

The department has continued the same policy as regards food service in 
hospitals and sanatoria. The dietitians are responsible for the requisitioning, 
preparation and distribution of footl, the management of employees and the 
general sanitation of the dietary department. A monthly report is submitted to 
head office from each departmental institution, showing an analysis of amounts, 
prices and the total cost of each classification of food used in the iru^titution; also 
a summarj- of the menus provided and details of special diets. These reports are 
reviewed, and a comparative criticism is returned to the institution so that each 
may have the advantage of the average experience. In the Units where poultrj' 
raising and gardening operations have been carried on, primarily for curative 
purposes, the institutions have benefited considerably. 



10 DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

The system inaugurated in connection with the Diabetic Clinic at Toronto 
is now also carried on in most of the hospitals. The correctly pregared, pro- 
portioned and selected diet is so intimately allied with treatment that it ha> 
necessitated the closest co-operation of the dietarj* and medical staffs. The pre- 
paration of food for diabetics is arranged quite separately from the general food 
supply and is done under the supervision of the dietitians. Materials used are 
weighed and left-overs from trays, if any, are weighed and checked. Patients 
are instructed regarding the food that is permitted and the articles of diet to be 
avoided. On leaving hospital, each patient is provided with a copy of all recipes 
used, information regarding certain food stuffs, and where these are obtainable, 
also a copy of the " Insulin Diabetic Diet Table," in order that treatment may be 
carried on at home. The need for guidance in after-care is of such vital 
necessity that a book has recently been written by the two dietitians who were 
the first to provide dietary treatment in conjunction with the use of insulin. 
The book i.« a simplified hand-book for diabetics, devoted chiefly to dietary 
recipes and suggestions. It is of great value in the treatment of diabetes, having 
been compiled as a result of the succcs.sful experimental work at the original 
Diabetic Clinic at Christie Street Hospital, Toronto. 

DENTAL SERVICES 

The following dental clinics were closed in 1924: — 
Mowat Sanatorium, Portsmouth, Ontario. 
Windsor, Ontario. 
Calgary, Alberta. 
Victoria, British Columbia. 
The employees of the Dental Division now number 31, as compared with 46 
on December 31, 1923. 

A resume of the services rendered during the vear Januarv 1, 1924 to 
December 31, 1924 follows:— 

DEPARTMENTAL CLINICS 



_ 


Canadians 


Imperials 


Other 
forces 


Total 




2,321 
49,546 


164 

3,117 


22 

418 


2,507 


Operations 


53,081 






CIVILIAN DENTAL REPRESENTATIVE.^ 


Completed 


664 
6,263 


28 
289 


4 

45 


696 
6,597 






UNITED STATES VETERANS' BUREAU 




147 
1,306 


62 
540 


6 


211 






1,852 









POST-DISCHARGE TREATMENT COMPLETED UNDER PROVISIONS OF ORDER IN 
COUNCIL P.C. 963 



United States, 3. 
SUMMARY 



Total cases completed — all forces, all countries. 
Total operations — all forces, all countries 



Total, 19. 



3,433 
62,250 



ANNUAL REPORT. 19U 11 

SE&SIONAL PAPER No. 18 

ADMINISTRATION BRANCH 

During the year 1924 the accounting work of the department wiiich up to 
April 1 had been conducted as a separate branch under the direction of a Super- 
visor of Expenditures, was placed under the control of the Director of Adminis- 
tration witli a Ciiiof Accountant in charge. No other changes of importance 
took place in the organization of this branch. 

Every effort has been made to effect as big reductions in staff as possible 
with the following results: — 





Sta£f 


Salaries 




920 
193 


t 

1,099,880 




208,048 








727 


891,832 








305 
51 


394,832 




64,676 








254 


330, 156 







The salaries of the staff employed in the Orthopaedic and Surgical Appliances 
Division shop are absorbed in the cost of manufacturing. As they are not a 
charge against the general administrative cost they are not included in the 
statement shown above. 



— 


Staff 


Salaries 


O. and S. A. Division, December 31, 1923 


125 
16 


S 

223,750 




35,783 






0. and S. A. Division, December 31, 1924 


109 


187,967 








260 


308,507 







VOCATIONAL TRAINING 

During the past year* 180 ex-soldiers were accepted for training and on 
December 31, 87 were still on the strength. 



LOANS 

During the year 20 applications were approved entailing an expenditure 
of $7,986.76. 

The collections during the year have been very satisfactory. 



*0( this Dumber 40 w«re trained in Federal GovemmcDt Dei>artmeats under the proviaions ot P. C. 2M4. 



12 DEPARTMEST OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 







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SE&SIONAL PAPER No. 18 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19Si 



EMPLOYMENT 



Further progress was made during the yoar toward-: amalgamating the 
Employment Service of the department witli that of the Kmpioyment Ser\-ice 
of Canada. This work has now been transferre<i in every Province except the 
province of Quebec. The employment situation as regards disabled ex-service 
men has not been as good during the year 1924 as it was during 1923. Reports 
received indicate that there will be a great deal of unemployment among this 
class of ex-soldicn- during the coming winter. 



— 


I92I 


1922 


1923 


1924 


Totals 


Disablrd men 

Ex-service men (not disabled) 


970 
1,218 


516 
920 


37.5 

817 


296 
703 


2,157 
3,658 



TRAINING .VXD EMPLOYMENT IN THE FEDER.\L CmL SERVICE 

During the year 40 disabled men were accepted for training under the 
provisions of P.O. 2944. Thirty-five of these diave completed training and 
been provided with positions through the Civil Service Commission. Five are 
still in training. 



TRAINED AND PLACED BY YEAR.S 



Department 


1921 


1922 


1923 


1924 


Totals 




1 



2 



17 


8 





1 

1 



1 




3 


2 




2 


2 

19 

1 


1 

3 

1 

1 


3 

20 



4 




2 


Auditor General's 

Customs and Excise 

Health 

Immi^ation and Colonization 

Interior 


3 
3 
6 
3 

3 


Po.st Oflire 

Public Printing and Stationery. 
Public Works.. 


22 
2 
39 


Trade and Commerce 


12 




30 


6 


30 


35 


101 



RELIEF 
The amount of relief orders issued each month of 1924 was as follows: — 



Januarj* . . . 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

.lun.- 



5.5,523 35 
62,422 99 
65,012 80 
50,736 35 
5.168 91 
3,787 15 



July 

AuKust 

September. 

October 

November. 
December.. 



$ 4,986 71 
3,544 .33 
4, 4.53 26 
8,016 26 
17,796 24 
55.537 75 

$ 3.36,966 10 



DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Relief granted in the various units during 1924 was as follows: — 



Province 



Unit 



Amount of Relief 



Quebec 

Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island., 

Eastern Ontario 

Central Ontario 

Western Ontario 



Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British Columbia., 
New Brunswick.... 

Total., 



24,4,50 21 

1.51,839 03 

6,770 49 



79,860 41 
4,450 86 



183,0.59 73 
56.086 79 
4,468 27 
4,181 79 
4,288 55 
569 70 

336,966 10 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19U 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

Relief as issued by weeks during 1924: — 



February 2 . 

9. 
16. 
23. 

1. 



Ist week, Januar>- 

2nd " 

3rd 

4th 

5th 

6th 

7th 

8th 

9th " March 
10th " 
nth " 
I2th " 
I3th 
I4th 
l.ith 
16th 
17th 
18th 
19th 
20th 
21st 
22nd 
23rd 
24th 
2oth 
26th 
27th 
28th 
29th " 
30th " 

31st " August 
32nd " 
33rd " 
34th " 
3.1th 
36th 
37th 
38th " 
39th " 

40th " October 
41st " 
42nd " 
43rd " 

44th " November 
45th 
46th 
47th 
48th 
49th 
50th 
51st " 
52nd " 
28th to 31st December 



April 



May 



June 



July 



September 6. 
13. 
20 



18. 
25. 

1. 

8. 
15. 
22. 
29. 
December 6. 



20... 
27. .. 
, 1924. 



545 
,032 
,207 
,340 
,158 
,494 
.601 
,.572 
.422 
!775 
,673 
..579 
.3.'!8 
,2.55 
,2.58 
989 
792 
458 
203 
177 
171 
125 
129 



109 
113 
117 
130 
140 
119 
115 
114 
112 
107 
115 
139 
150 
147 
148 
187 
190 
220 
228 
274 
428 
575 



,120 
,327 
,271 
855 



\ 6.219 89 

12,082 90 

11,984 36 

12,418 99 

12,817 21 

18,087 06 

16.261 16 

14,930 41 

13.144 36 

20,7.59 11 

17,371 43 

15,101 85 

11.780 41 

14,860 ,56 

15,771 16 

9,443 21 

6,842 23 

3,819 19 

1.529 68 

1,412 45 

1,116 83 

1,109 95 

1,041 88 

937 46 

914 71 

893 10 

993 64 

971 97 

1,059 70 

1,0.57 24 

904 16 

922 46 

833 16 

886 22 

902 49 

1,027 36 

1,167 39 

1.149 79 

1,088 72 

1,303 90 

1 , .165 06 

1 , 670 83 

1,792 11 

1,684 36 

2,512 23 

3,636 91 

5,3^1 81 

6,325 29 

9,378 74 

11,689 77 

14,386 74 

12,301 34 

7,781 16 



33,642 $ 336,966 10 



BLINDED SOLDIERS 

After care of blinded ex-members of the forces has been carried on through 
arrangements made with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. The 
Institute with its services organized in various parts of Canada operates through 
its representatives or establishes such other contact as may be necessary in 
individual cases. It is not necessary to deal at lengtli with the forms of service 
being given beyond listing as follows: — 

1st. Book loans from Library. 
2nd. Monthly Braille magazine. 



16 DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

3rd. Provision of raw material at cost price. 

4th. Purchase for cash of products in excess of local sales. 

5th. Employment in industries organized by institute. 

6th. Placement in private industries or occupations. 

7th. Visiting, follow up and advice with more or less continual contact 

by correspondence. 
8th. Provision of poultry feed at cost price for poultry- farmers. 
9th. Provision of typewriter and Braille writer supplies. 
lOtli. Provision of brush-up courses tlirough home teachers, etc., where 

necessarj-. 

Club rooms are permanently maintained at Pearson Hall for the use of 
blinded soldiers only, also lodging accommodation for transient blinded soldiers. 
In September of this year a meeting of the members of the Sir Arthur Pearson 
Club of Blinded Soldiers and Sailors was held at Pearson Hall, followed by 
a social gathering and reunion. This was attended by all blinded soldiers 
within reasonable distance. 

Blinded soldiers are, \s'ith scarcely an exception, now settled down in their 
own iiomcs or with relatives or friends and are following trades or occupations 
for which thej- were trained. In a certain number of cases original occupation 
has been given up owing to ill health or changed circumstances while in others 
opportunities have led to change. Listed below -will be found occupational 
divisions witli stated number of men folloN\ing each line mentioned. 

During the year the death of two blinded soldiers has been reported. This 
brings the number of blinded soldier deaths up to ten. 

TABLE SHOWING OCCUPATIONS OF BLINDED SOLDIERS 

Boot repairinK and matmaking 3 

Broom making 3 

Book agent 2 

In business for themselves 7 

Employed with business firms 9 

Employed with Canadian National Institute (or the Blind 1 

Commereial salesman 1 

Farming S 

General secretary 1 

Instructor in Braile stenography • 1 

Insurance 2 

Joinery 4 

Massage 19 

Matmaking and netting 5 

Osteopathy 2 

Piano tuning 2 

Pciuhry f:irming, netting, etc If> 

Hoiil articles, rattan work, netting.. 31 

Kiturned to former occupations . 4 

Slcnographcr with business firms. . . 1 

Stenographer with government 6 

Translating and teaching French, - 1 

Unable, unwilling or waiting tor work 27 

Retired on account of ill health or other reasons 2 

Deceased 10 



Of the above classified list 125 are resident in Canada, 29 in England, 1 
in Belgium, 1 in France and 2 in the United St^ites. 

SHELTERED EMPLOYMENT 

Worksliops are still operated by the Red Cross Society in Halifax, St. 
John, X.B., Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver antl Victoria uniler the agreement 
outlined in last year's report. Little change in organization has taken place, 
but the Montreal shop has removed to larger and better equipped premises. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924 17 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

The department is taking over the operation of the St. John workshop on 
Januan' 1, 1925. ' 

The department still continues to operate Vetcraft shops at Toronto, 
Hamilton, Kingston, and London. Owing to the necessity of vacating the Scott 
Barracks at Hamilton the shop and sub-unit office staff were moved to the 
Sanford building on February' 7, 1924. After careful investigation it was 
found to be desirable and economical to move the Toronto shop also. A new 
one-story building 60 feet by 100 feet was constructed at Christie Street 
Hospital; it was occupied on December 1, 1924, in addition to taking over 
part of the 0. and S. A. Facton^ and an unoccupied building. This centralizes 
all the department's activities in Toronto and affords excellent shop accommo- 
dation. 

On the whole the workshops have made a very good showing, more particu- 
larly when the difficulties due to the prevailing industrial depression are taken 
into consideration. They are all becoming firmly established in the community 
and recei\'ing good support. 

The need of some provision of this nature was closely examined into by 
the Ralston Commission and favourably reported on. A number of the men 
have shown marked improvement and are fit for outside employment, but satis- 
factory- placements are hard to secure. 

Arrangements were again effected whereby the department secured the 
manufacture of the poppies and wreaths for Armistice Day. Orders were 
secured for practically the whole Dominion and in the case of British Columbia, 
Manitoba, Quebec, Ontario, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick the poppies were 
made in the provincial workshops. In Alberta and Saskatchewan, where no 
workshops arc operated, the work was given to disabled veterans through an 
arrangement with the unit offices. 

The number of men on strength as at December 31, 1924, was 346, dis- 
tributed as follows: — 

Red Cross Workshops — 

Halifax 

St. John, N.B 

Montreal 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver 

Victoria 





Departmental Workshops — 




20 


Toronto 


99 


22 


Hamilton 


35 


32 


London 


18 


40 


Kingston 


11 


37 






32 







Since provision was first made for the care of this class 1,053 men have 
been struck off the strength of the shops, of whom approximately 50 per cent 
have gone to regular employment, or owing to increase of pension, etc., have 
taken their discharge from the shops. 

The average cost per man per month based on returns for the past year 
for all shops is $30.78. 

RETURNED SOIyDIERS' INSURANCE DIVISION 

The latest date to which applications for insurance under the Returned 
Soldiers' Insurance Act could be received was September 1, 1923. The work 
of issuing policies has, therefore, now ceased. The principal work of the divi- 
sion is now concerned in the receiving of premiums and the paying of claims. 
There is a considerable volume of work, however, entailed in these activities, 
as an average of twenty thousand remittances are received each month, and 
during the calendar year just closed 267 claims were received for a policy 
value of $687,500. 

The settlement of death claims entails the most careful supervision, as 
many legal points are constantly arising. Many policies have now earned the 



18 DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

right to cash values or extended t^rm insurance, and by September, 1925, all 
policies will have earned these privileges. 

To date 211 have surrendered their policies for cash. 

The income received from premiums has been more than sufficient to 
meet all claims, and it is anticipated that this condition will continue for some 
years to come. 

STATEMENT FOR PERIOD JANUARY 1, TO DECEMBER 31, 1924 
Policies 







211 
14 

403 
11 


$ 605,000 00 
7,516 00 










1,015.500 00 


Disability claims 


21,625 00 


Death Claims 












723 
267 


t 2.2.53,000 00 


Policy value of death claims Jan.-Dcc. 1924 




687,500 00 


Total value of death claims to December 31, 1924. . . 


990 


2,940,^00 00 






498 
183 


$ 1,652,220 17 


Settled by cash iiayment or annuity Jan.-Dec. 1924 


1923... 
924... 


598,452 94 




681 


$ 2,250,673 11 


Insurance cancelled by Section 10 R.S.I. Act, December 
Insurance cancollcfl l>y Section 10 R.S.I. Act, Jan.-Dec. 1 


158 
78 


S 419,779 83 
140,049 06 




236 


559,828 89 


Claims pending settlement at December 31, 1924 


73 




Lapses 








To December 1923 6,466 


$15,405,500 00 
9,900,000 00 




Jan.-Dec. 1924 4,585 


$25,305,500 00 




Re-ixstateme.sts 








To December 1 923 . . 4 , 268 
Jan.-Dec. 1924 .. .2,184 


(10,244,000 00 
4,687,000 00 


$14,931,000 00 




Net lapses 4,599 


$10,374,500 00 


Policies in force as at December 31 , 1924 




27,666= 


=$61,404,500 00 


InXOME AN1> ExPEN'DmRE 






Balance as at December 31, 1923 
Income Januan,- to December, 1824.. 






$ 1.696.656 80 
1,742,235 68 




$ 3,438.892 48 


Expenditure January- to December, 1924. . 






545,045 04 


Balance as at December 31, 1924 


$ 2,893,847 44 



Interest from April 1, to December 31, 1924, not included. 

ORTHOPAEDIC AND SURGICAL APPLIANCES DIVISION 

The work of the division during the past year has closely followed that 
of previous years and the twelve Orthopa'dic Depots are still operating. 

The return of appliances issued corresponds with that of last year in that 
there is again a general slight decrease on the whole. The rawhide dress arm 
which was introduced in 1922 still finds great favour on account of its light- 
ness and this development of the department is an important one. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1914 



19 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

There is no radical change to report from the designs and standards of 
last year, aitliough the average weight of artificial legs shows a decrease which 
is greatly appreciated by tlie wearers. There has naturally been certain agita- 
tion regarding the introduction of metal limbs and the department ordered 
two from each of the leading manufacturers in England. These are all of the 
wood metal type and they arc at present being tried out in actual use. Obser- 
vations made so far do not show any pronounced superiority of the wood 
metal limb over the verj' satisfactory willow appliance which is now being 
manufactured. The department has also successfully produced a Duralumin 
metal shin which is meeting with success, and the experimental shop has pro- 
duced a combination Duralumin control of standard type to replace three of 
those already in use. 

The Ophthalmic Section is kept ver>' busy, and many extremely difficult 
cases, after extensive trials, have been fitted with satisfactory eyes. 

One marked feature of the year's work has been in the manufacture of 
orthopaedic boots. By improved methods of manufacture and the co-opera- 
tion of tlie depotiS a reduction in cost of $2.78 per pair has been effected. 

The average costs of the different classes of appliances manufactured 
during the past four years is as follows: — 



Artificial legs 

Artificial arms 

Peg legs 

Orthopffidic boots 

Minor orthopffidic appliances. 

Spectacles 

Artificial eyes 



81 73 
97 .53 
27 .').'> 
20 48 
13 39 



76 34 
56 27 
35 15 
20 80 
8 83 



$ 

78 2S 
54 37 
32 48 
20 59 
7 83 
5 05 
4 59 



70 99 
76 96 
r. 87 
17 81 
8 24 
4 78 
1 56 



A comparison with last year's figures shows a general decrease, except in 
the case of arms and minor orthopaedic appliances. In the former the increase 
is due to the rawhide arm and the latter to the fact that abdominal belts and 
appliances of this nature are practically all made in the depots now, instead 
of being purchased. 

The increase in the average cost of the arms is due to the additional cost 
in making the rawhide arm. The additional comfort given to the wearer is 
well worth the additional cost. 



20 DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

NUMBER OF VARIOUS APPLIANCES ISSUED BY THE ORTHOPAEDIC AND SURGICAL 
APPLIANCES DIVISION 



Delivered Prior to 1924 



Do- 
minion 

of 
Canada 



Work- 
men's 

Compen- 
sation 
Boards 
of 

Canada 



London 
Eng- 
land 



United 
States 

of 
Ameri- 



Delivered during 1924 



Do- 
minion 

of 
Canada 



Work- 
men's 
Compen- 
fation 
Boards 

of 
Canada 



London 
Eng- 
land 



United 
States 

of 
Amer- 



Legs (all types) 

Arms (all types) 

Orthopaedic boots 

TcK legs 

Opti'al supplies 

Minor orthopaedic ap- 
pliances 

Repairs to legs 

Repairs to arms 

Repairs to hoots 

Repairs to all other ap- 
pliances 



7,202 
2,387 

32,118 
1,382 

19,845 

72,712 
30,007 
2,953 
35,036 

8,735 



475 

8 

132 

2,408 
821 
40 
197 

225 



517 
136 

5,261j 
51 

1,874 

20,639 

6,288 

446 

6,183 

1,116 



282) 

118 

5 



Total 212,377 



42,511) 



610) 



8,327 
2,691 

38, 170) 
1,496 

22,112 

97,515) 
37,498 
3,507 
41,616 

10,119 



PAY AXD PENSIONS DIVISION 

The functions of this division liave not changed materially during the past 
year. The most important alteration was the transfer of the Pensions Admin- 
istration Section (whose function was to give effect to the decisions of the Board 
of Pension Commissioners) to the Accounts Division when that division came 
under the jurisdiction of the Director of Administration. This transfer naturally 
decreased the staff and the monthlv pay-roll. On December 31, 1923, the 
number of staff was 41 and the total monthly pay-roll $3,675. On December 
31, 1924, the number of staff was 14 and the total monthly pay-roll $1,550. 

CII.VPLAIN SERVICES 

Pvelif^ious work in the hospitals and visitation of the sick, whether in 
hospital or in their homes, has Iwen maintained by the chaplain services. At 
present one full-time and fifteen part-time chaplains take care of this work. 
This is a reduction of three part-time chaplains over the preceding year. The 
total cost for cliaplain services at present is S9,470 per year. The Canadian 
Red Cross, the Y.M.C.A.. and kindred orjianizations have carried on their work 
in providing recreation and entertainment for the patients in the hospitals during 
the past year. 



ASSISTANCE FOB RETURN OF EX-MEMBERS OF THE FORCES TO BRITISH ISLES 

The Parliamentary Committee on Pensions and Soldiers' Re-establishment 
recommended that in special cases assistance should be granted to men who 
were patients of the department to enable them to return to their own people 
overseas. During the past vear authoritv was granted in the following case: — 

P.C. 281-1940, dated October the 3ist, 1924, authorized transportation to 
Lt. Thomas Stephens, his wife and child, from Montreal to England- This was 
given effect to and carried out in December, 1924. 



AXM'AL REPORT, im 21 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

INVESTIGATION" SIX'TIUX 

During the year 1924 investigations have been carried out bj- the Investiga- 
tion Section as follows: — ■ 

Social Service Reports rcgartlins orphan children to the number of 600. 

Investigations concerning widows and children and dependent parents 
approximately 5,000. 

Investigations concerning the dependants of disability pensioners approxi- 
mately 200. 

Other investigations to the number of 50 have been carried out at the 
request of the Australian Government. 

As a result of the investigations carried out the Board of Pension Commis- 
sioners have been enabled to decide whether pension shall be awarded, continued, 
cancelled, increased or decreased. The nature of other investigations was to 
ascertain whether pension is properly applied for the care of such children as 
are in receipt of pension. New claims received have also required investigation. 
Inquiry was necessary in many cases to ascertain whether widows had remarried 
or not. Inquiry was also carried out as to whether guardians were expending 
pension moneys wisely for the care of children entrusted to them or not. Inves- 
tigations were conducted concerning the condition of pensioners claiming addi- 
tional pension for alleged dependents. Complaints made concerning disability 
pensioners who are not supporting their dependents are also inquired into. 

Inquiry is also made into claims made by dependents in cases where it is 
shown that the death of an ex-member of the Forces, or pensioner, is attribut- 
able to service and that the dependents are eligible for pension or insurance. 

The above procedure, in so far as disability pensioners and dependent 
parents, widows and children and orphan children are concerned, is also carried 
out in Great Britain and Western Europe. 

IWYMENTS OF WAR SERVICE GRATUITY 

The total number of War Service Gratuity payments between January 1, 
1924, and November 30, 1924, was 110, amounting to — principal, $13,151.49, and 
interest, $2,231.40. 

In sixteen cases lump sum payments were made to the amount of $3,501.65 
and interest $647.84. 

Payments to the Director of Records were made in nine cases, the principal 
amounting to $3,159.97. and interest $587.86. 

The number of ordinarv payments completed was twenty-four, amounting 
to— principal, $2,332.23, and interest, S995.70. 

The number of monthly payments was thirty-six, amounting to — principal, 
$2,575 and the number of payments made to the Receiver General was twenty- 
,five, amounting to $1,582.64. 

FOREIGN RELATIONS SECTION 

Pursuant to the reciprocal arrangements entered into between the Depart- 
ment of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment and the respective Governments of the 
United States of America, South Africa, France and Belgium, the Foreign Rela- 
tions Section of this division has continued to furnish such benefits as were 
due ex-members of the Allied forces resident in Canada (excluding ex-Imperials), 
ex-members of the Canadian forces resident outside Canada (exclusive of Great 
Britain and the Irish Free State) and ex-members of the Imperial forces resident 
in the United States of America. 

As might be expected by far the greater part of such benefits have been 
distributed to Canadian and British ex-ser^•ice men in the United States of 



22 DEPAKTMEXT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

America, who (with the exception of ex-British ofiBcers) arc eligible to the same 
benefits as if they were residing in Canada. 

Examinations, hospitalization and treatment are arranged and provided by 
the United States Veterans' Bureau, which bureau is reimbursed by the depart- 
ment for its expenditure. Such allowances however as are due the pensioners 
and patients are paid direct to them by this division. The following is a state- 
ment of the disbursements during the year, January 1 to December 31, 1924: — 

(a) Treatment pav and allowances issued S 181,924 79 

(b) Clothing for the insane 192 50 

(c) Funeral grants 2, 785 38 

(d) Travelling allowances to patients — 

(1 ) cx-Canadians 383 30 

(2) ei-Imperials 287 79 

(c) Travelling Allowances to pensioners — 

(1) ex-Canadians 1,011 54 

(2) ex-Imperials 564 31 

(!) Refunded to United States Veterans' Bureau for patients and 

pensioners (travelling allowances) 23, 764 26 

Total $ 210.913 87 



IMPERIAL PENSIONS DIVISION 

During the present year a net increase of 586 pensioners is shown in the 
following table: — • 



Number 

as at 
31, 12, 23 



Number 

taken on 

during 

year 



Number 

struck off 

during 



Number 

as at 
31, 12.24 



1 . Officers and dependents of officers and Royal Irish Constab- 

ularj' 

2. Disability pensioners at British rates residing in Canada 

and tlie United States .•■.■■•: 

3. Disability pensioners at Canadian rates residing in Canada 

and the United States 

4. Widows and dependents at British rates residing in Canada 

and the United States 

5. Widows and dependents at Canadian rates residing in Can- 

ada and the United States 

6. Ser\'icc pensioners and army reserve residing in Canada 

and the United States 

7. Naval Service and pre-war disability pensioners residing in 

Canada and the United States 

8. All others 

Totals 



2,604 

6,911 

1,316 

4,457 

350 

1,324 

1,226 
214 



1,901 
1,437 

796 

14 

305 

282 
25 



1,400 

1,676 

102 

553 

19 

131 

358 
12 



3,105 

•6,672 

1,291 

4,700 

345 

1,498 

1.150 
227 



18,402 



4,837 



4.251 



18,988 



•Of this number 2,824 reside in the United States. 

In the " Awards Section " the work has remained practically stationary 
except tliat the number of pension medical examinations has been reduced from 
8,197 to 6.481; this being explained by the system of Final Awards mentioned in 
the report for the year 1923. 

AWARDS MADE 

Canadian new awards 48 

Canadian renewal awards 1 . 177 

Canadian final payments 13 

Amended awards 241 

Imperial renewal awards 3,629 

Imperial interim awards Sll 

"No payment" awards (Art. 9 pre-war disability etc.) 559 

Officers' interim awards 8 

Comparative rates for election 43 

6,529 

Final awards recommended 502 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19S4 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

ENTITLEMKXT APPEALS 
Appeals prepared for Entitlement Appeals Tribunal — London, England. 



23 



ASSESSMENT APPEALS AGAINST FINAL AWARDS UNDER SECTION 4 OF THE WAR 
PENSIONS ACT, 1921 



United 
Stal«s 



.•\ppcal.s listed 

.\ppcals prepared and forwarded to Federal Appeal Board, Ottawa 

Balance to be prepared 



447 
30 



At the present time the department has on strength for medical treatment 
241 c.x-nicmbcrs of the Imperial forces, of which number 75 are in the United 
States and 166 in Canada. During the year ju^t closed 790 ex-members of the 
Imperial forces have received treatment at the hands of tiie department, of which 
number 332 were in the United States and the remaining 458 in Canada. 

It is estimated that during the year 52,000 letters were despatched from 
tlie division to pensioners and to official offices. 

A summary of the disbursements made by this division follow's: — 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF DISBURSEMENTS MADE BY THE IMPERI.\L PENSION 
DIVISION FROM JANUARY 1, 1924, TO DECEMBER 31, 1924 





London 
Account 


Ottawa 
Account 


Payments of retired pay, pension, etc. to officers and dependents of officers 
ehargeab.c to the War Office, Air Ministry, Ministry of Pensions. 
Admiralty, Indian Office, Colonial Office, Royal Irish Constabulary, 
includini; miscellaneous payments of balances of sen-ice pay, etc. author- 


£ s. d. 

261,3.57 15 4 
2,042 10 9 

438,929 19 2 

57,633 9 5 

25,14.5 9 6 

483 7 7 

148 14 1 

4,381 1 


$ cts. 






Payments of pension to W.O.'s. men and dependents chargeable to War 


704,484 91 


















Payment of I'eeoration .\ wards in respect to members of C.E.F. — charge- 
able to War Office 




Payments to Department in respect of treatment and maintenance, pay and 
allowances, subsistence and sundries, medical examinations, clothing 
and comforts, and transportation— chargeable to Ministry of Pensions. . 


626.501 31 


Miscellaneous charges to War fJfTicc. Ministry of Pensions and Admiralty. . . 




6,648 84 
89 80 








27,225 4 6 


28 157 59 


Canadian Supplementary Pensions, oflScera and dependents — chargeable to 


60.260 53 
16,682 31 

10,687 94 


Canadian Supplementarj- Pensions, W.O.'s, N.C.O's and men — chargeable 




Payment of dilTerence between proceeds in currency of sterling pension and 
par rates of exchange to pensioners in receipt of Canadian Supplementarj- 










Total 


817,347 11 4 


1,453,513 23 







24 DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMEST 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

ENGINEERING DIVISION 

The Engineering Division is responsible for the maintenance and repairs to 
hospitals, clinics and administration offices. Also for rentals, taxes and water 
rates, fuel supply, fire protection, mechanical transport, laundries and farm and 
garden operations. 

M.^IXTENAXCE .\KD REP.\IRS 

The Department of Public Works upon request carry out major repairs, the 
general maintenance being taken care of by the employing of general service 
staff under the department. 

Department of Public Works' appropriation, twelve months to Dec- 
ember 31, 1924 S 31,250 00 

Expenditure — Appropriation used up by October, 1, 1924 

Dept. S.C'.R. appropriation, twelve months to December 31, 1924. . 45. 163 00 
Expenditure 45, 161 00 

RENTALS 

Premises rented through the Department of Public Works comprise prac- 
tically all accommodation used by this department. 

Rentals in force January 1, 1924 % 113,322 84 

December 31, 1924, P.W.D S 47,646 60 

" " '' S.C.R t 1,378 CO 

$ 49,024 60 

(Made up of hospital accommodation $ 10,544 31 

Clinics, offices, etc.) 38 480 29 

FUEL SUPPLY 

Quantity of fuel purchased 12 months to Dec. 31, 1924 tons 28,137 

Bonuses paid $ 536 20 

Penalties imposed 4,870 21 

Net cost of fuel in bunkers 157,906 30 

Average cost per ton in bunkers 5 62 

1923 6 84 

FIRE PROTECTION 

Six fires in hospitals were reported during the year but the property loss 
was practically nil. 

Fire protection appliances have been kept up to standard and carefully 
inspected and fire drills carried out periodically at each hospital. 

MECHANICAL TRANSPORT 

Number of cars in operation January 1 , 1924 23 

Number of cars in operation December 31, 1924 11 

Cost of maintenance including drivers' wages t 20, 968 71 

LAUNDRY OPERATIONS 

During the past year the laundry at Christie Street Hospital was closed as 
it was found that laundry could be done by contract more cheaply. 

Laundries are still being operated at the Psychopathic Hospitals of Ste. 
Anne's and Westminster. 

Number of pieces laundered for twelve months ending December 31, 

1924 1,098,460 

Number of pieces last year 1,358,212 

Average cost per piece this vear 02- 645c. 

" " last year 02-824c. 

Number of pieces contracted for with outside laundries this year 656,397 

Number of pieces last year 702,439 

Average cost per piece this year •04c. 

lastyear •W47 



ANNUAL REPORT, im 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 



FARM AND GARDEN OPERATIONS 

Farm and garden operations and bcautification scliemcs show good progress 
at the Psychopathic Hospitals of Ste. Anne's and Westminster, and witli the 
advantage of greenhouses recently constructed at these centres, a further advance 
in the above operations may be expected. 

No outside labour has been employed as the patients are able, with the 
supervision of the hospital staff, to take care of all operations. 

RECORDS AND CENTRAL REGISTRY DIVISION 

RECORDS 

1. Generally the work of maintaining records and statistics has been con- 
tinued with but few cliangcs. The checking of pension and treatment pay and 
allowances as shown in Daily Orders against the Heatl Office file was discon- 
tinued when the unit auditors were made responsible for auditing all authoriza- 
tions of treatment pay and allowances. 

2. During the year a new Hollerith card for pensions statistics was adopted 
and the pension records were repunched on it. This has simplified the method 
of maintaining these statistics. 

3. Life Certificates which were sent out to all permanent disability and 
dependent pensioners have proven to be useful not only in picking up changes in 
the status of the pension but also in securing additional allowances for pen- 
sioners who had failed to claim for them. 

4. The Transportation Section was transferred to the Accounting Group with 
effect October 16, 1924. 

5. There has been a reduction of over thirty-three (33) in the staff of the 
division. 

CENTRAL REGISTRY 

The total turn-over of files and correspondence during the year reflects in 
a general way the work of the department. This, it will be seen fom the follow- 
ing figures, indicates a slight reduction in the volume of work. The reduction 
of files was partly due to the simplification of the work of pensions authoriza- 
tion. 





1924 


Weekly Average 




1923 


1924 


FiUs- 

Total number i.ssupd 

Total number ru-charged . . 


493,480 
225,862 


17,806 
37,458 






719.342 


14.680 


C arret pondence — 

Incoming 

Outgoing 


642.046 
1,035,997 






1,678,043 


34.245 



PURCHASING AND STORES DIVISION 

This division makes purchase of all supplies required by the department 
and provides service by carrying in stock certain standard supplies for which 
there is frequent demand. Competitive prices are obtained on all purchases made 
and only such supplies are purchased as are not readily available bj' transfer 
from another Government department. No issues are made from Stores except 
on requisitions signed by a duly authorized party. 



26 DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Discounts are, wherever possible, taken advantage of with the result that 
during the year a saving has been effected of over $10,289.97. The total pur- 
chases for the vear, which include equipment, stores, drugs, fuel and food sup- 
plies amount to $827,504.54. 



The amount of surplus stores placed on disposal since January 1, 1924, and 
the total amount to date is as undernoted : — 





Amounts 


Total 
amount 
listed 


Head Office 


$ cts. 

38,047 08 
8,080 25 

12,863 19 
7,198 18 

45,441 03 
3.469 35 
7,805 86 
2,998 36 
8,046 26 

13,204 74 
3,925 10 


$ cts. 
145,900 62 


"A" Unit 


409,006 29 


"B" Unit 


269,030 06 




18.5,948 20 




780,369 85 


"F" Unit 


261,590 84 




194,964 68 


"H" Unit 


148,.'>80 90 


"I" Unit 


213,070 63 


"J" Unit 


396, .Me 67 




100,584 98 




296 86 








Total 


151,079 40 


3,105,890 58 







Transfers have been made to Government departments as follows: 





Jan. 1, 1924 
to Dec. 
31, 1924 


Total value 

of goods 
transferred 




S cts. 
440 96 


$ cts. 
3S,.'j86 99 




159,954 21 






1.418 SO 






5,707 18 




6.553 91 

74 20 

13,607 07 

1,242 S4 

32, 7.'^0 .i5 

519 27 

18,085 71 


9,295 40 




31.929 23 


Indian Affairs 

Interior 


.326,032 97 
115,430 n 
498,432 88 




131.847 95 




221,292 74 




18,465 64 




25,986 12 

13,787 49 

4,323 61 

175 82 

263 40 


130,715 64 




1.12,215 39 




85,722 02 




1 7,. 179 22 




963 40 




1..550 13 




28 .TO 
100 00 
209 65 


244 ."iO 




100 00 


Miscellaneous 


2.352 83 




118,149 10 


l,9,'i0,437 23 



Surplus on hand December 31, 1923 $ 86,.534 51 

Surplus during year 1924 151 , 079 40 

Transfers to other departments $ 118,149 10 

.Sales 7, 727 10 

Re-issues 81,439 51 

Balance on hand December 31, 1924 30,298 20 



$ 237,613 91 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924 27 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

All oquipinout on charge to the department was rhccked up liuring the year. 
.■Ui inventory was taken of all stock in stores. This includes commissary stores, 
general supply stores and stores in disposal. 



Commissary Supplies. — The only stock carried has been such as has been 
necessary to supply the services required for the hospitals. Advantage has 
been taken, wherever possible, to make contracts for supplies to be delivered 
as required from the vendor. In order to obtain the best prices, also to keep 
the quality of the goods supjilied on contract to a high standard, it has been 
necessary in most cases to have these contracts cover a comparatively short 
period of time. 

SU.MM.\RV OF STORES AND KQUIPMKNT 

Tlic amount of equipment on hand on December 31, 1924: — 

Equipment $ 1,493,907 03 

The amount of stores on hand as on December 31, 1924 — 

General and medical $ 330, 351 .53 

Surplus 30, 298 20 



Value of stores and equipment on hand. S 1,854,556 76 

Value of Surplus Stores January 1 to December 31, 1924 125,876 20 

Surplus stores tran.sferred within department, January 1 to Dec- 
ember 31. 1924 81,439 51 

Value of supplies and equipment issued twelve months ending 

December 31 , 1924 1 , 452, 522 12 



Total value of stores and equipment issued 1924 S 1,669.837 83 

EQUIPMENT SECTION' 

A certain amount of cciuipment became surplus to requirements, was listed 
for sale and passed to the salvage officer of the tjovernment Contracts Super- 
vision Committee for disposal. 

Very little equipment was purchased during the year, generally speaking, 
only such as was required for replacing worn out equipment and furnishings 
in the different hospitals. 

ST.\TIOXERY .\XD MULTIGR.\PH SECTION 

Supplies were procured on requisition on the Government Stationery Offico 
with the exception of certain inter-departmental forms which were multigraphed 
by the department. 

REPORT OX THE WORK OF THE REHABILITATION COMMITTEE 
OF TORONTO 

By the Director of the Committee 
policies 

The policies which this committee adopted and are rigidly adhering to may 
be stated as follows: — 

1. They set aside all political, religious and personal ambitions, and must 
concentrate their efforts on tlie sole object of securing suitable and permanent 
employment for partly disabled ex-service men. 

2. They feel assured that in every place of employment there are jobs 
which do not make demands upon all the physical faculties of a man, and that 
by careful study of these jobs partly disabled ex-service men can be selected 



28 DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

with remaining physical resources sufficient to enable them to do the work as 
eCBciently as any able-bodied man. 

3. They study the man in a private and personal interview, endeavouring 
to find the kind of work for which the man is best fitted in temperament, social 
tendencies, etc. This is no superficial interview but rather a friendly discus- 
sion of the man's problems from every angle with a view to best serving him. 

4. They study the job from the standpoint of physical and mental demands 
together with any technical knowledge or experience that may be required. 

5. They submit the job specifications to their industrial doctors, who 
examine every man before placement so that they may be assured of the exaci 
nature of his disability and have the benefit of professional judgment upon his 
physical fitness for the job to which tiiey are ai^signing him. 

6. They keep in touch with the man when placed in employment to learn 
whether or not he is capable of doing the work to the satisfaction of his employer 
and to guard him against any misunderstanding on the part of his fellow- 
employees or his foreman. 

7. In cases where the man proves incompetent or inefficient they assume 
the responsibility for taking him off the job; this relieves the employer of any 
unpleasantness which may be connected with the discharging of a partly dis- 
abled ex-service man. 

8. They keep the job and finally fit a man to the work who will produce 
on a par with any able-bodied man on that particular job. This means they 
place the man on the basis of service and not sympathy. The bonus feature 
covers only the breaking-in period when a man starts on a production job, and 
must not be considered as a form of vocational training. Where piece-work is 
in practice they make up the difference between what he actually earns on 
piece-work plus his pension — if any — and 32^ cents per hour for a limited 
period. Where he is on day work he may not be able to produce enough to 
justifj' the payment of the usual base rate on the job; in this case they ask the 
employer to pay him what he thinks he will be worth for a short time and they 
make up the difference between that plus his pension — if any — and 32^ cents 
per hour. Wien they place a man they have a definit* understanding with the 
employer as to the time required to break him in to the job. The rate of 32^ 
cents per hour is only a tt'mporary subsisting wage, and both the man and the 
employer are usually as anxious as the Committee for the man to become pro- 
ficient and earn the full base rate. 

In other words, the committee practically adopts the partly disabled ex- 
service man and directs him as a business man would his son. 



Despite the discouraging experiences which some employers have had with 
a percentage of returned men, the committee has succeeded in impressing over 
500 employers with the necessity of giving partly disabled men an opportunity 
to work and of further assisting them to " make good." Employers have 
assured the committee that they will give partly disabled ex-ser\ice men 
preference in placement, and will entertain suggestions in selecting jobs which 
are suitable to the various disabilities. 

The first month was spent in organizing, selecting and training a competent 
staff, registering men and installing a flexible office record system which would 
facilitate an accurate and reliable classification of men according to disabilities, 
pension, ape, etc. This registration is not merely a superficial interview but 
rather a friendly discussion with the man in relation to his disabilities, past 
experience, economic needs and social tendencies. The conMnittee considers 
" Registration " one of the most essential features of the scheme. Total regis- 
trations to December 31 were 1,082 men. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924 29 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

Tlie gross expenditures to December 31, 1924, were $20,737.34, which 
includes the cost of organization, administration and t)onus. During this period 
the committee has phiced 162 men at a gross cost per placement of $122.38. 
Only five men, or approximately three per cent of the total placements can be 
classed as " failures," which indicates that partly disabled ex-service men can 
" make good " in employment if properly selected and systematically followed 
up, after placement. 

The total bonus paid amounts to $310.70, or $23.90 per man receiving 
bonus, or $1.91 per man placed. It is remarkable that only 13 men required a 
special brcaking-in allowance — or bonus — to fit them to the job. The gross 
cost per placement has been reduced from $173.25 in August to $122.38 in 
December, and as business conditions improve this cost will undoubtedly be 
reduced. 

These men have 414 dependents; therefore, the work of the Committee 
has actually contributed to the welfare of approximately 575 individuals. These 
men have been unemployed for an aggregate of 1,355 months during the past 
two years, or an average of 8.3 months per man. 

During the past two years these men have drawn $13,540 cash relief, and 
have contracted debts (which are outstanding) of $13,609.96, which makes a 
total liability to the Government or Community of $27,149.96. 

The average present earnings of the men placed are at the rate $998.57 per 
year; therefore, from permanently placing these men at an expenditure of 
$20,737 (expenditures of the Committee) will change the economic condition 
of the.<e men from a liability of $27,149.96 to an asset of $161,767. 

The General Committee, after making a careful analysis of the Director's 
report on operations, which was submitted at the semi-annual meeting, feels 
assured that the results attained thus far are sufficient to confirm the view 
expros^ed in the last paragraph of the Scheme submitted to the Fetlcral Govern- 
ment which read: "The placement of men by this selective method may be 
comparatively slow, but we believe positive. It offers a high percentage of 
permanency in employment, whicli is the prime object of this Scheme, and we 
believe will eventually reduce the cost of relief, improve the unemployment 
situation, and greatly improve the morale of the ex-service men in general." 

ACCOUNTS DIVISION 

In connection with the report of the activities of this division, it may be of 
interest to mention that 192.916 cheques were issued on Re-establishment 
account; 764,424 cheques were issued on Pensions account; in addition, 18,612 
items of refunds were received from all sources; approximately 36,000 warrants 
for passenger transportation and 3,200 warrants covering freight and express 
shipments were issued during the same period. 

In addition to the usual books of account required to record the financial 
transactions of the department, a system of Cost accounts is maintained to 
control the operations of the O. and S. A. workshops in Toronto and each of the 
units, and the Vetcraft workshops in Toronto and Hamilton. 

At Head Office Cost Control accounts are maintained for each institution 
operated by the department. 

All subsidiary ledgers and books of original entry at Head Office and the 
units are in balance and agree with the relatiye Control accounts in the main 
books at Head Office. 

It will be observed that the form in which the financial operations of the 
department are presented has been materially altered this year. It is felt 
that the new arrangement will display in a more concise and readable manner 
the results of the year's transactions. 

These statements, with a short explanation as to the features contained 
in each, are as follows: — 



30 DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISIIMENT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

1. Income and Erpenditurc, Fiscal Year 19-23-24- — On the left side is 
shown the appropriations granted by Parliament; revenue received from all 
sources, together with the balances of trust funds as at the first of the year. 
On tlic riglit side is shown the gross disbursements made, divided into direct 
payments to men and their dependents, both on account of pensions and re- 
establishment, payments for services rendered such men, and payments made 
to outside organizations which render service to returned men, unexpended 
portions of the appropriations voted by Parliament for the fiscal year and the 
balances of trust funds at the close of the year. 

The various authorities under which expenditures were made are quoted 
following the items to which they apply. Where no authority is given the 
Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment Act applies. The various items 
of income and expenditure are in agreement with the amounts shown in the 
Public Accounts and Auditor General's reports. The surmnary statement 
covers the main divisions of the department's income and expenditure condensed 
for reference purposes. 

2. Net Disbursciucnt on Pensions Account for the period April 1, 1916. to 
March 31, 1924, by fiscal years. 

3. Net Disbursements of the Department of Soldiers Civil Re-estahlish- 
mont on Ro-ostablishment Account for the period July, 1915, to March 31, 
1924. by fiscal years. 

4. Current Assets of the department as at March 31, 1924. 

Cash advances made for travelling, petty cash, maintenance accoimts 
outside institutions. Red Cross workshops, etc. 

Stores — value food, equipment, etc., held by department for use in hospitals, 
offices, etc. 

Disposal Stores — surplus goods available for cash sale or transfer to other 
Government departments. 

5. Vocational Loans as at March 31, 1924- — Outstanding Loans distributed 
by Provinces. 

6. Acconnts Receivable at March 31, 1924- — Amounts due from Great 
Britain, British Dominions, United States and Allied Governments for treatment 
of tiicir ex-nationals, and services rendered Canadian Government departments — 
Department of National Defence, Department of Indian Affairs, etc. 

Red Cross Menioliiil Workshops. — Payments made by department on 
account of shops in St. John and Halifax. Amounts due from outside hospitals 
and sanatoria. 

Value departmental equipment on loan to civilian institutions in which 
departmental patients are treated. 

7. Government Department Transfers, P.O. 3017, 1920. — Value of equipment, 
stores, etc., tran^^ferrcd to other Government departments during the fiscal year, 
and from date of passing of above mentioned Order in Council. 

8. Transportation Isxned — Fiscal Year 19'33-24- — Cost of transportation 
warrants issued by department covering all passenger travelling and freight and 
express shipments; distribution by railways. 

9. Appropriations by Fiscal Y'ears to March 31. 1924- — Appropriations 
granted by Parliament for account of pensions and re-establishment. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1921, 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

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ANNUAL REPORT, 1924 



39 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

STATEMENT No. 4.— STATEMENT SHOWING DISTRIBUTION OF CURRENT ASSETS BY 
PROVINCES AS AT MARCH 31, 1924 



Unit 


Province 


Total 


Cash 
Advances 


Stores 


Disposal 

Stores 


H.O. 


Ottawa 


$ 24,611 46 
105,. '540 49 
25,2.51 97 
6,976 .50 
206,183 47 
45,064 34 
12,265 60 
6,789 86 
17,081 23 
19,473 47 
14,068 43 


5,701 71 

681 24 

10 00 

308 25 

25,546 12 


$ 18,909 75 
100,121 .50 
19,097 05 
5, 765 84 
146,665 78 
43,227 33 
11,586 03 
0,123 03 
16,283 90 
16,562 32 
11,923 88 




"A" 




4 737 75 


"B" 
"C" 


Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island 


6,144 92 
902 41 


"D" 




32,971 .57 
1 837 01 


"F- 




"G" 




632 05 


27 52 


"H" 




686 23 


"I" 


Albert 11 


100 00 

2,859 97 

250 00 


697 3.3 


"J" 




51 18 


"K" 




1,894 55 










$483,306 82 


$ 37,109 34 


$396,267 01 


$ 49,930 47 



STATEMENT No. 5.— STATEMENT SHOWING DISTRIBUTION OF VOCATIONAL LOANS 
BY PROVINCES AS AT MARCH 31, 1924 

Quebec $ 7,884 85 

Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island 

Eastern Ontario II, 

Central and Western Ontario 61,3 

Manitoba 13,7 

Saskatchewan 13, " 

Alberta 19,2 

British Columbia 21, 

New Brunswick 7,5 

Total S 162, 



,596 
,322 
,380 
,713 
,781 
,200 
,125 
,556 



STATEMENT No. 6.— ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE AS AT MARCH 31. 1924 

Great Britain $ 162, 670 7 

Brit ish Dominions, United States of America and other Allied Governments. 38, 007 f 

Canadian Government Departments 432,846 .' 

Red Cross Memorial Workshops 19,041 .' 

Provincial Governments 80, 777 S 

Outside Hospitals and Sanatoria 372,254 1 

Other Miscellaneous Accounts 6, 007 i 

Total $1 ,1 1 1 ,606 1 



STATEMENT No. 



-GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT TRANSFERS 
P.C. son Dated 1920 



Transfers have been made as follows: — 

Fiscal Year Total to 

Department 1923-24 31-3-24 

Acriculture $ 6,59134 $ 38,406 38 

Air Board 159,9.54 21 

Customs and Inland Revenue 1,418 80 

Finance SOS 18 5,707 18 

Health 2, 741 49 

Immii?ration and Colonization 3,8-38,03 31,8.55 03 

Indian A£rairs 21,373 42 324,110 OS 

Interior 7,298 66 114,187 27 

Justice 41,959 44 488,.337 74 

Labour 700 00 

Marine and Fisheries 141 00 1,.5.50 1.3 

Militia and Defence 46,174 84 214,292 39 

Mines 7,593 08 131, .502 95 

Naval .'Service 18,465 64 

Post Office 21600 

Printincand Stationery 13,080 77 140,476 09 

Public Works 25,600 .52 119,933 .32 

Railways and Canals 20, 349 26 85, 722 02 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 435 95 17,4.39 72 

Miscellaneous Department 2, 143 18 

Total S 194,944 49 $ 1,899,1.59 62 



DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 GEORUE V, A. 1925 

STATEMENT No. 8.— PASSENGER TRANSPORTATION, FISCAL YEAR 1923-24 

Total 
Sen'icc Expenditure 

1. General Administrative and Medical Staff t 16,680 12 

2. Medical Officers, Nurses and Personnel 13,563 98 

3. Men railed in for treatment and Orthopaedic repairs 59,126 78 

4. Escorts to treatment cases 6,903 21 

5. Transportation deceased patients and escorts 1 , 121 93 

6. Tra\-clling Medical Boards 2, 726 71 

7. Pensioners examination 65, 159 38 

8. Vetcraft Staff travellins 3, 463 02 

9. Blind ex-members of the forces 3, 638 45 

10. Men taking vocational training .560 85 

11. Transportation lieu of unemployment relief 1,002 81 

12. Staff O. and S. A. Branch 642 45 

13. .Soldiers' Advisers. Federal Appeal Board 693 07 

14. Imperial Pension Office (Ottawa) 99 18 

15. Royal Commission Pensions — Re-establishment 4,802 22 

16. Members, Federal Appeal Board 2,503 73 

17. Soldiers' Comforts 52 47 

18. Accounts Receivable 18, 106 36 

t 200,846 72 

19. Freight and Express 24,024 83 

Total $ 224,871 55 

Distribution bt Rauw.ws 

Canadian National Railways S 131 , 297 39 

Canadian Pacific Railway 52,536 90 

Sundrj' Railways 17,012 43 

Total $ 200, 846 72 

Freight and Express — 

Canadian National Railways S 8, 109 29 

Canadian Pacific Railway 5,157 54 

Canadian National Express 8, 732 97 

Dominion Express 1 , 815 59 

Sundry Railways and Express Companies 209 44 

Total J 24, 024 83 



ANNUAL REPORT, Jm 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

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DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 



15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



DISABLEMENT FUND 



The following statement of loans advanced and repayments made during 
the year 1924 indicates the activity of the fund: — 

Sundry advances outstanding 31-12-23 $ 24,674 97 

Total advances made during the year 117,648 56 

Refunds received during year { 

Bad debts written off 

Sundry loans outstanding 31-12-24 



98.445 37 
2,000 65 
41,877 51 



$ 142,323 53 S 142,323 53 

During the previous year sundry advances amounted to §71,28010. 

DISABLEMENT FUXD STATEMENT AS AT DECEMBER 31 . 1924 
Subscriptions S 93, 70S 70 



Interest on same. 
Securities held at cost — 

Face value $85,000.00 

Loans outstanding — 

Head Office S 32, 823 



S 77, 226 41 



49,456 56 



Units. 

Donations- 
Current year 

Previously made 

Bad debts wTitten off — 

Current year 

Previous years 

Adniini.stration Expenses- 
Current year 

Previously expended. 

Cash on hand — 

Units 

Head Office 



9,054 13 S 41,877 51 



1,244 39 
7,717 23 



2,000 65 
5,483 88 



161 66 
177 80 



8,961 62 



7,484 53 



5,581 27 
1 , 694 46 



$ 143,165 26 t 143,165 26 



STAFF 

The' following statement shows the total staff of the Department as at 
December 31, 1924. 

Head Office. Ottawa .590 

"B" Unit, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island 184 

"A" Unit, Quebec 309 

"C" Unit, Eastern Ontario 66 

"D" Unit, Central Ontario .527 

"F" Unit, Western, Ontario 289 

"G" Unit. Manitoba 108 

"H" Unit, Saskatchewan ,. . 51 

"I" Unit, Alberta 185 

"J" Unit, British Columbia 201 

0\'crseas Office 14 

Total 2,524 

SERVICE CLASSIFICATION OF STAFF AS AT DECEMBERS!, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923 and 1924 



Service in France 

Service in England 

Ser\'ice in Canada 

Rejected or exempted from military sen'icc 

Boys under and men over military age 

Civilians — Male 

Civilians — Female 



3,793 
470 
278 
92 
466 
207 

2,820 



2,959 
552 
239 
61 
238 
95 
1,635 



2,557 
387 
188 
43 
180 
26 
1,505 



2, 105 
321 
146 
31 
128 
26 
1,066 



1,7.59" 
248* 
112' 
27 
96 
23 



1924 



1,495 
206 
83 
23 
64 
15 
638 



70 



59-2 
8-2 
3-3 
•9 
2-5 
•6 
25-3 



Total 8,126 5,779 4.886 3.823 3,094 2,524 1000 

(') The peak le.id was reached March 31. 1920, when the staff of the nep;irtmont numbered 8,791 

irrespective of t)>e staff of the Board of Pension Commissioners which at that date was upwards of 1.000. 
(') Board of Pension Commissioners' staff, numbering 854 w.i- t:ikin ovir hv the Department during 

1921. . .^ 

(^) TncllldiniF 117 TCiiriainff Si«terQ 



(•) Including 117 Nursing Sisters. 
(*) Including 29 Nursing Sisters. 
(') Including 2 Nursing Sisters. 



ANXUAL REPORT, 1921, 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 



43 




44 DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMEXT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 



APPENDIX I 

Order in Council P.C. 212, dated the 8th February, 1924. Rules and 

regulations regarding the Federal Appeal Board. 

His Excellency the Governor General in Council on the recommendation of 
the Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, and pursuant to sections 11 and 
13 of chapter 62, 13-14 George V, being an Act to amend the Pension Act, and 
pursuant to section 2 of chapter 69, 13-14 George V, being an Act to amend the 
Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment Act, is pleased to make the 
following rules and regulations and the same are hereby made and established 
accordingly: — 

1. Tlie Federal Appeal Board may hear appeals from decisions of the Board 
of Pension Commissioners concerning pensions and appeals from decisions of 
the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment as to the rights of former 
members of the forces to treatment with pay and allowances and such appeals 
may be heard by a member or members of the Board at the following places 
from time to time as occasion may demand: Ottawa, Halifax, St. Joiin. Char- 
lottetov\Ti, Quebec, Montreal, Kingston, Toronto, Hamilton. London, Winnipeg, 
Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver and Victoria, provided that 
if at any time there are, in the opinion of the board, a sufficient number of appel- 
lants at any place and it is considered that it would be more convenient to hear 
appeals at such other place, the Board or any member thereof may sit at such 
place; 

2. The Federal Appeal Board, if requested by the proper authority of His 
Majesty's Government, may hear appeals of former members of the Imperial 
forces against deci.<ions of the Ministry- of Pensions, subject to proper provision 
for repa\Tnent of expenses involved; 

3. The following appeal procedure in respect of eligibility for pension, or 
treatment with pay and allowances shall be operative: — 

(a) Notice of appeal shall be sent by the appellant or on his behalf, by 
letter addressed to the Secretary, the Federal Appeal Board, Ottawa. The notice 
should state whether the appeal is taken against a decision of the Board of 
Pension Commis.sioners or the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, 
and it should give the address to which communications regarding the appeal 
ma}- be directed; 

(6) Upon receipt of notice of appeal othcr\\Mse than through the Official 
Soldiers' Adviser or other representative of the appellant, the Federal Appeal 
Board shall refer the case to the Official Soldiers' Adviser or other representa- 
tive, who after examining the Unit Office file in the presence of a representative 
of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, as provided for in para- 
graph (d). (e) and (/i hereunder, shall ad\nse the appellant whether in his 
judgment it is advisable for him to proceed with his appeal. Should he recom- 
mend that the appeal be not proceeded with, the appellant shall have the right 
to withdraw it or not, as he deems best; 

(c) When an appeal is to be proceeded with, the Federal Appeal Board 
shall forward to the unit office of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-estab- 
lishment a list of all relative papers on the head office file. If it is found that 
there arc any relative papers not on the unit file, a copy of the same shall be 
made and shall be forwarded to the Unit Director of Administration or, for any 
sittings of a quorum of the board, the head office file may be for\\-arded to the 
unit office. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924 45 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

(d) In cases where the Official Soldiers' Adviser is acting for the appellant 
the Official Soldiers' Adviser shall have reasonable access to the file relating to 
the appellant's claim in the presence of a representative of the Department of 
Soldiers' Civil Rc-cstablishnient, provided (i) that a written reciucsi is received 
from the appellant that the case to be taken up by the Official Soldiers' Adviser 
or in the case of his applying in person to the Official Soldiers' Adviser that 
written authorization is furnished by him that the Official Soldiers' Adviser be 
granted access to the file, or (ii) that the case has been referred to the Official 
Soldiers' Adviser by the Federal Appeal Board. 

(ct Should appellant desire that his case be handled by counsel or repre- 
sentative other than the Official Soldiers' Adviser, authority for such counsel or 
representative to see the file in the presence of a representative of the Depart- 
ment of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment may, in the discretion of the depart- 
ment, be granted by the deputy minister. The conditions respecting the 
production of files to the Official Soldiers' Advisers shall also apply to any other 
representative; 

(/I Access to the file of any former member of the forces shall only be 
granted to an Official Soldiers' Adviser or other representative of an appellant 
on his undertaking to respect the confidential nature of any information con- 
tained therein or otherwise communicated to him in the course of his duty, 
that he will disclose such information to the appellant only insofar as is neces- 
sary to enable such additional evidence or proof to be produced in substantia- 
tion of the appellant's claim and will not disclose to the appellant or to anyone 
else except the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-est.ablishment, the Federal 
Appeal Board or the Board of Pension Commissioners, the name of the inform- 
ant or the source of such information as may be contained on the said file. 

ig) Should it be found by the appellant, the Official Soldiers' Adviser, or 
other representative of the appellant, that there is evidence in support of the 
claim which had not been considered by the Board of Pension Commissioners 
or the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, the Federal Appeal 
Board shall be notified and the appeal shall not be disposed of until the new 
evidence has been submitted to the Board of Pension Commissioners or the 
Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, as the case may be, and a 
further decision given; 

(h) The Federal Appeal Board shall give the appellant and the Official 
Soldiers' Adviser not less than seven days' notice — by letter or telegram sent to 
the address given on the notice of appeal — of the date and place at which his 
appeal will be heard. 

()) Should an appellant fail to proceed with his appeal at the time at which 
it is set down for hearing, the Commissioner presiding at the hearing may in his 
discretion dismiss the case, in which event there shall be no further right of 
appeal, or allow it to stand over until another occasion on which appeals are 
heard in the district in which he resides; 

(j) The provisions of section 11 of chapter 62, 13-14 George V, relating to 
procedure and practice shall apply, mutatis mutandis, to appeals made under 
section 2 of chapter 69, 13-14 George V; 

(A;) The out-of-pocket expenses of an appellant whose appeal is main- 
tained whether by a member of the Board or a quorum thereof shall be paid on 
the scale provided for in clause 20 of Order in Council P.C. 580, dated the 10th 
day of March, 1922, as amended; 

(/) In appeals from decisions as to the right of former members of the 
forces to treatment with pay and allowances, when a decision in favour of the 
appellant is given the costs or allowances antecedent to the appeal — including 
the cost of medical treatment and hospitalization and the issue of pay and 
allowances — shall only be paid in accordance with the regulations of the 
Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment; 



46 DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISIIMEXT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

(m) In all cases, the appellant and the Board of Pension Commissioners or 
the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, as the case may be, may 
by consent in writing, with the approval of the board, or the presiding member 
thereof, dispense with the form of proceedings herein mentioned, or some portion 
thereof ; 

(n) After hearing the case, the Board or presiding member thereof may 
allow the appeal or disallow the same or reserve its decision as may be war- 
ranted by the evidence and may seem to it or him just; 

(o) The formal judgment of a quorum of tlie Board shall be signed by the 
Chairman, or presiding Commissioner, anil the Secretary. 

(p) In case the appeal is allowed, the formal judgment shall contain such 
information regarding the nature and time of origin of the disability in respect 
of which appeal is made as to enable the Board of Pension Commissioners or 
the D.S.C.R. to intelligently assess the pension or extend treatment. 

(q) In case the appeal is disallowed, the formal judgment shall contain 
such information regarding the nature of the disability as will enable the Board 
of Pension Commissioners to determine whether a further claim for pension on 
new grounds, may be entertained. 

(Sgd.) E. J. LEMAIRE, 

Clerk of the Privy Cenmdl. 



APPENDIX II 

Order in Council P.O. 1653, dated the 18lh September. 1921. Aiilliority 
under mIiicIi the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment 
may provide quarters and maintenance for indigent pensioners. 

The Committee of the Pri\'>'- Council have had before them a report, dated 
September 16, 1924, from the !Viinister of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, sub- 
mitting that from time to time the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establish- 
ment is called upon to deal with former members of the forces who have been 
awarded pension for less than their total disability, as only a part thereof is 
attributable to service, but who, due to the effect of the non-pensionable portion 
of their disability, are in need of treatment or merely quarters and maintenance. 
The disability from which they suffer does not require active hospitalization and 
is incurable in nature. As time goes on such pensioners will become more 
numerous, due largely to increasing age. 

The matter was considered by the Parliamentary' Committee on Pensions, 
Soldiers' Insurance and Re-establishment, which met in 1922. The following 
extract is taken from the report of that Conunittee: — 

" Under legislation as now existing, the Department has no general 
authority to provide treatment except with full pay and allowances. That 
being the case, it would seem clear that it cannot provide continuous care 
for the cases imder discussion to which, under other circumst-ances, if 
legislation was provided, care might be given. It is felt that the Govern- 
ment would be meeting its obligations were such cases to be provided 
with whatever care or treatment each requires, and rather than pay each 
one full pay and allowances, to grant medical treatment subject to a 
continuation of the pension as granted by the Board of Pension Com- 
missioners less a fair deduction for maintenance cost in the case of those 
pensioners whose pensions are sufficiently high to enable deduction to be 
made without personal hardship to the man and his dependents." 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924 47 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 18 

The class of pensioners who would appear to have a first claim on the 
department are those with a pensionable disability of 20 per cent and upwards. 
It is, therefore, considered that the case would be fully met were provision made 
for the care and maintenance of such pensioners. 

At the present time the Department is operating hospitals at Halifax, St. 
John, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary and Vancouver, where 
there are available beds, some of which might be set aside for those men for the 
purposes of quarters and maintenances and, if necessary, treatment. 

The minister, therefore, recommends that the Department of Soldiers' Civil 
Re-establishment be authorized to put into effect the following regulations: — 

1. The term "pensioner" as used herein means a former member of the 
Canadian forces or a former member of the Imperial or Allied forces who was a 
pre-war resident of Canada who is in receipt of or is entitled to a pension of not 
less than 20 per cent, or other allowances of equal value, payable by or through 
the Board of Pension Commissioners or the Department of Soldiers' Civil 
Re-establishment in respect of a disability resulting from injurj' or disease or an 
aggravation thereof attributable to or incurred or aggravated during service in 
the Great War and who does not require therefor active hospitalization. 

2. The department may. at its discretion, provide quarters and maintenance, 
and when nccessaiy medical treatment in a departmental institution for any 
indigent pensioner whose pensionable disability though not requiring active 
hospitalization or whose non-service disability added to his pensionable disability 
prevents him permanently from obtaining or continuing remunerative work and 
thereby earning sufficient to maintain himself and who as a result of these con- 
ditions has or will become a public charge. 

3. On the admission of a pensioner to a departmental institution, partial 
cost of his maintenance up to forty dollars (S40) per month may, at the dis- 
cretion of the Board of Pension Commissioners and the Department be paid to 
the department from pension or any other moneys to which the said pensioner 
may be entitled provided that such payment to the department shall not be 
made from pension or other payments, payable to or in respect of his dependents. 
Of the sum so paid to the department, three dollars (S3) per month shall be 
repaid to the said pensioner in order to provide comforts, etc., and seven dollars 
($7) per month shall be credited to him on the books of the department for the 
provision of such clothing as he may require. 

The Committee concur in the foregoing recommendations and submit the 
same for approval. 

(Sgd.) E. J. LEMAIRE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 



APPEIVDLX m 

Order in Council P.C. 2161 dated the 18th December, 1924. Authority 
under which the Department of Soldiers" Civil Ke-establishment 
may receive monies, &c. on behalf of ex-members of the Forces 
and may assume guardianship in certain cases. 

His Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of 
the Acting Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-estahlishment, and under the provisions 
of subsection 5 (2) (d) of chapter 67 of the Statutes of 1924, being an Act to 
amend the Department of Soldiers' Ci\il Re-establishment Act, is pleased to 
make the following regulations and the same are hereby made and established 
accordingly: — 



48 DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

(1) Tlie Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment is autliorized to 
receive from any Department of llie Government of Canada or anj- Provincial 
Government, or any person, any properties or monies held or payable on behalf 
of any persons or any properties or monies held or payable on behalf of the 
dependents of any such persons, wiienever such persons are being or have been 
cared for under the provisions of the Department of Soldiers Civil Re-establish- 
ment Act, cither by medical treatment or training. Such authority shall extern 1 
to any case where the person cared for is on the strength of the department fur 
medical treatment or training or lias died wiiile on tiie strength of the depart- 
ment or having completed treatment or training has been discharged therefrom. 

(2) A receipt given by the deputy minister or by an officer of the Depart- 
ment of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment duly authorized by the deputy minister 
for properties or monies received under the autiiority of the preceding regulation 
shall constitute a valid receipt and a full and complete discharge for any such 
properties or monies received by the department. 

(3) The deputy minister may and is hereby authorized to assume the 
guardianship of any insane person who is being or has been cared for under the 
Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment Act and as guardian to admin- 
ister the properties or monies authorized to be received by him or his dependents 
as hereinbefore provided and the deputy minister may assume tlie guardianship 
of such person and perform the functions of such office without an order of the 
court or other formality, and any notification in writing to any person by him 
that he is guardian of any insane person shall be accepted as evidence of that 
fact. 

(4) In any case where the deputy minister has assumed the guardianship 
of a former member of the Imperial forces who was a resident of Canada or of 
the United States on the 4th August, A.D. 1914, he may subject to the regulations 
of the British Ministry of Pensions elect whether the said former member of the 
Imperial forces and his dependents shall be granted or credited with allowances 
at British or Canadian rates in accordance with the agreement between the 
department and the Britisii Ministry of Pensions, and any such election shall 
be binding upon such former member of the Imperial forces and upon his 
dependents. 

(5) The department may retain any properties or monies whicli it has 
received on belialf of any insane person who lias been cared for under the pro-vis- 
ions of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment Act. for such time 
as the deputy minister considers necessary or desirable, and the department 
furthermore may dispose of such properties or monies to such insane person or 
liis dependents or as may be deemed expedient or may dispose of such properties 
or monies to the estate of such person if deceased. 

(6) " A former member of the forces " shall include any person who has 
served in any of the Naval, Militan*- or Air forces of Canada or any person who 
may be granted treatment by the department under a reciprocal agreement 
between the department and the Government of any country outside the Domin- 
ion of Canada. 

(Sgd.) E. J. LEMAIRE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 



REPORT 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1924 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KINGS MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1*24 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 19 



To General His Excellency the Right Honourable Lord Bi/nq of Vimy, G.C.B., 
G.C.M.G., M.V.O., Governor General and Commander in Chief oj the 
Dominion of Canada. 

May it Ple.\se Youk Excellency: 

I have the lionour to submit, herewith, for the information of Your 
Excellency and the Parliament of Canada the Annual Report of the Department 
of Health, being for tlie year ended March 31, 1924. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

H. S. BfiLAND 

Minister of Health. 

Ottawa, September 1, 1924. 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 19 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Quarantine Scn-icc 5 

Leper Stations 14 

Immigration Medical Ser\'ice 15 

Marine Hospital Service 21 

Venereal Disease Control 26 

Housing, with Hospitalization and Sanitation 28 

Opium and Narcotic Drugs 31 

Proprietary or Patent Medicines 37 

Child Welfare Division 38 

Food and Drug Laboratories 41 

Public Works Health Act 47 

Pollution of Boundarj- Waters 49 

Financial Stat^ement 54 



15 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 19 A. 1925 

REPORT 

OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1924 

Ottawa, August 28, 1924. 

Hon. H. S. Beland. M.D., 

Minister of Health, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I liave tlie lionour to report on tlio Department of Health for the year 
ended March 31, 1924, under the following iieading.s: — 

1. Quarantine Sen'ice (including Leper Stations). 

2. Tnimigration IMcdical Ser\'ice. 
.3. ^larine Hospitals Service. 

4. Venereal Disease Control. 

a. Housing, with Hospitalization and Sanitation. 

6. Opium and Narcotic Drugs. 

7. Proprietary or Patent Medicines. 

8. Child Welfare. 

9. Food ami Drug Laboratories. 

10. Public Works Health Act. 

11. Pollution of Boundarj' Waters. 

12. Financial Statement. 

J. A. AMYOT, 
Deputy Minister of Health. 

(1) QUARANTINE SERVICE 

Organized Quarantine Stations were maintained during the fiscal year at 
the following ocean ports: — 

Charlottetown, P.E.I. (Keppoch) , 
Chatham, N.B. (Middle Island) , 
Halifax, N.S. (Lawlor's Island), 
Louisburg, N.S., 
Nortii Sydney, N.S., 
Quebec, Que. (Grosse Isle), 
St. John. N.B., (Partridge Island), 
Victoria, B.C. (William Head). 

The following table shows the number of vessels and personnel inspected at 
the several stations: — 



DEPAHTMEXT OF HEALTH 



15 GEORGE V. A. 1925 



4t 




'J' 


eg 


o 


p-S 


1 




ll 






M 






o 1 


■^ 


1 

to 






■* 


= g?3 : 


C^ 


1 
1 






Z 




§" : 




i 

s 

O 




i 




t 

1 

CO 






r 


S2S 


CO 


,-2 

fe.S 






1 




oVco 


i 


.9 

09 






S22S§a 




-il 

^1 


lO 00 00 » b* N 00 r- 

^oa?oa»aoes 


2 


a 


i 

i 


p. 


£ 

J 


■SiT. 


a 

XI 

X 

i 


J 




d 
pa 

1 

> 


] 

^ 





REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER \ 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 19 

Persons to the number of 758 were detained at Quarantine Stations. Of 
these, 189 were actually sick; the remainder, 569, either accompanied the sick 
or were contacts of the respective diseases. These latter include a large number 
detained for observation at the William Head Quarantine Station from vessels 
arriving with smallpox on board. 

DISTRIBUTION IN HOSPITAL AND DETENTION BUILDINGS, BY STATIONS 



Station 


Sick 


Hospital 
days 


Contacts 
and persona 
accom- 
panying 
sick 


Detention 
period 
in days 


Total 
persons 
detained 


Total days 
in hospital 

and 
detention 
quarters 


Halifax, N.S. (Lawlor's Island)... 

Quebec, Que. (Grossc Isle) 

St. John, N.B. (Partridge Island) 
Victoria, B.C. (William Head) .. 


32 
127 
19 
11 


407 

1,435 

190 

155 


36 
219 

48 
266 


460 
1,849 

378 
1,806 


68 
346 

67 
277 


867 
3,284 

568 
1,961 


Totals 


189 


2.187 


569 


4,493 


758 


6,680 



DISTRIBUTION IN HOSPITAL AND DETENTION BUILDINGS, BY DISEASES 



Diagnosis 


Sick 


Hospital 
days 


Contacts 
and persons 
accom- 
panying 
sick 


Period of 
detention 
in days 


Total 
persons 
detained 


Total days 
in hospital 

and 
detention 
quarters 




16 
1 
4 

29 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
5 
2 
1 
2 
57 
9 
1 
1 
9 


98 
7 

31 
475 
2 
4 
5 
7 
7 
4 

85 

93 
9 
4 

11 
600 

68 
8 

15 

39 


2 
2 
34 

1 
2 


43 

14 
16 
472 
2 
8 


23 
3 
6 

63 

3 
I 
8 
1 

2 

8 

6 

2 

3 

173 

26 

3 

1 

37 

5 

1 

12 

15 

278 

5 

4 

43 

8 

3 
4 


141 




21 




47 




947 




4 




12 




5 




7 


49 


56 




7 


Dysenterj' 


1 


4 


8 
85 




3 
4 
1 

1 

116 

17 

2 


12 
20 
4 
3 
1,061 
94 
16 


105 




29 




8 




14 




1,661 




162 




24 




15 




28 
5 


119 
35 


158 




35 




1 
9 
4 
11 

1 
10 
2 

1 
2 

1 


3 
94 
127 
216 

14 

88 
50 
4 
8 
6 


3 


Scabies* 


3 
11 

267 
3 
3 
33 
6 
6 
1 
3 


36 

207 

1,841 

12 

15 
238 
129 

24 
4 

15 


130 

334 


Smallpox 


2,057 
26 


Teething* 


20 




326 




179 




28 




12 




21 






Totals 


189 


2,187 


569 


4,493 


758 


6,680 



•These cases were landed at Quarantine for observ'ation on account of pyrexia, indicating possible 
infectious disease. Conditions were later diagnosed as stated. 



8 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Commencing with the opening of navigation on the St. Lawrence river in 
the spring of 1923, the quarantine inspection base was transferred from Grosse 
Isle to Father Point, the quarantine officer now going on board vessels at the 
same time as the pilot. Any vessel found to have quarantinable or minor 
infectious disease on board was ordered to stop at Grosse Isle for the discharge 
of the sick and contacts. Tiiis new arrangement, together witii the now estab- 
lished practice of clearing vessels passing Father Point during the night, on the 
sworn statement of the captain and ship's medical officer that the passengers 
and crew are free from quarantinable or other infectious disease, aids materially 
in the expeditious movement of vessels steaming up the St. Lawrence river. 

The following extracts aire from reports received from the respective 
quarantine officers: — 

Grosse Isle, Quebec (Medical Superintendent, Dr. G. E. Martineau). — "The 
quarantine inspection of vessels arriving by the St. Lawrence, which had taken 
place at Grosse Isle since the year 1886, was this year carried out at Father 
Point, the steamers stopping at Grosse Isle only when they had cases of con- 
tagious disease to land, or when, for one reason or another, they could not 
be cleai-ed at Father Point. For this purpose the assistant medical superinten- 
dent here was transferred to Father Point as quarantine officer in charge, and a 
fourth medical officer was appointed for ser\-icc there, also a cabin stt-ward 
to care for the doctors. Two residences were purchased at Father Point for the 
accommodation of the medical quarantine officers and their families. 

" Eight hundred and sixty-two vessels arrived at Father Point which 
required inspection, and of tliese all but twenty were granted pratique there 
immediately on arrival. Of the twenty which passed Father Point without 
pratique, eighteen were cleared here, one at Chicoutimi and one at Levis, the 
two latter having passed quarantine on account of misunderstanding and the 
inspection boat being out of commission. 

" Of these 862 steamers inspected, 142, or about 16 per cent, were passenger 
vessels, the remaining 720 being freight boats, ninety-two of which, however, 
carried from one to thirty-seven passengers, and one carrying 63. 

"The total of 198,658 persons passing ((uarantine this season shows an 
increase of 56,457 over last year in the number of passengers, although the 
number of passenger steamers this year was thirteen fewer than that of last year. 
This marked increase is made up almost entirely of passengers travelling third- 
class, who numbered 32,837 in 1922, as compared with 86,198 in 1923, an increase 
of 53,361. 

'■ Infectious diseases were reported or discovered on inspection fifty-nine 
times. The diseases so reported or discovered included typhus, smallpox, scarlet 
ievcr, diphtheria, measles, erysipelas, mumps, enteric fever, and pyrexia for 
observation. On several occasions steerage passengers refused to allow the ship's 
surgeon to vaccinate them or their children, but allowed the quarantine officer 
to do so. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 9* 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 19 

" Deaths and births occurring on boaid ships during the voyage were 
recorded as follows: — 



Name of Vessel 


Number 

of 
deaths 


Cause of deaths 


Number 

of 

births 










Hcjrina , 








Uronrhitis 




































3 












8 


3 









"The ss. Swiftstire, Conia and San Macedonia coming from Tampico, Mexico, 
where smallpox was reported to be present at the time they sailed, in May last, 
were ordered to call at Grosse Isle for final pratique and completion of fourteen 
days from the date of departure a? required bj' the regulations. 

"Following is a table of vessels arriving at Father Point with suspicious or 
positive cases of major quarantinable diseases on board and sent to Grosse Isle 
for diagnosis or necessary action to be taken: — 



Name of Vessel 



Date 
arrived 



Suspected 
disease 



Disease 
diagnosed 



Pratique 
granted 



Canadian Logger. . . 

Montrose 

Regina 

MrKuntic 

Montcalm 

Empress of France. 
Montlaurier 



May 21. 
June 30 
July 1. 
July 8 
Oct. 12 
Nov. 7. 
Nov. 24 



Smallpox. 
Typhus... 
Smallpox. 
TjTjhus. . . 
Typhus. . . 
Smallpox. 



.41astrim. 
Varicella. 
Measles. . . 
Varicella. 
Measles. . . 
Typhus... 
Varicella. 



May 23 
June 30 
July 1 
July 8 
Oct. 12 
Nov. 9 
Nov. 24 



"The Government Merchant ]\Iarine steamer Canadian Logger arrived at 
Grosse Isle from Barbados, ^lay 21, with a case of alastrim among her crew of 
twenty-seven. The bill of health mentioned five cases of alastrim at St. Lucia 
where she had touched. All members of crew who had been landed to be dis- 
infected, together with their baggage, bedding, etc., were detained for quarantine 
and observation with the exception of two who had had smallpox. The steamer 
having been thoroughly disinfected was permitted to proceed on the 23rd in 
charge of a new crew sent down from Montreal for that purpose. The members 
of crew detained under observation having been vaccinated and revaccinated 
were released as soon as evidence of successful vaccination appeared or definite 
immunity reaction manifested itself; that is, seventeen on May 29, six on June 
2, and one on June 5. The patient under treatment at the hospital was dis- 
charged as cured on June 16. 

" The ss. Empress of France from Southampton via Cherbourg with 83 
cabin, 129 intermediate, 739 steerage passengers, and 492 crew, arrived at 
quarantine at 1 p.m., November 7, with a case of high pyrexia and rash, very 
suspicious of typhus fever, among foreign steerage passengers. The patient, a 
child of five years old, with six members of her family, were immediately 
removed from the .'hip and hospitalized at the station, and the Weil-Felix 
test was made to jiscertain the condition before allowing the vessel to proceed. 
Although the Weil-Felix test was negative, the clinical symptoms and history of 
the case were found so pathognomonic that we could not but conclude the pres- 



10 DEPART ME\T OF HEALTH 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

ence of tj"phus fever, the Typlius R^searcli Commission of the Loapruc of Red 
Cross Societies to Pohiiid rcportinp; a failure of tlie test in 3 to 3.6 per cent 
of the cases, and Leonard Rogers in as many as 10 per cent. The 397 steerage 
passengers occupying the section of the ship where the case had developed and 
the forty-one crew attending to these were therefore landed at the Western 
Division of the station for quarantine and observation; and the fumigation 
of the emptied section and hospitals, of a cubic capacity of 1^3,000 feet, was 
carried out at once by burning 413 pounds of sulphur. All intermediate and 
remaining steerage passengers on board were also examined, but being found 
free from vermin, and not having been exposed to infection, they were per- 
mitted to proceed with the steamer, which left quarantine at 1.45 a.m., Novem- 
ber 9. No new cases developed among the detained passengers and crew in the 
Western Division and, consequently, they were released on November 20 after 
having taken a disinfecting bath on arrival and having had all their personal 
effects, baggage, etc., thoroughly disinfected- One birth occurred during the 
detention, and it was necessary to transfer a female contact to the hospital for 
a case of abortion. 

" Six hours after landing a secondary case of typhus fever developed at the 
hospital among the children of the family detained under observation for 
typhus, but it was of a milder form than the original case, which recovered 
slowly. This secondary case was able to leave the hospital with the rest of the 
family on December 1. 

" The total number of days during which the above passengers and crews 
were detained is as follows: — 

SS. Canadian Logi;er 206 

SS. Empress of France 5,256 

Total 5, 462 

" The following cases of measles were overlooked on inspection at Father 
Point, or developed on the journey to Quebec, where they were found on arrival 
and returned to the station on the quarantine boat: — 



Name of Vessel 


Date 


Disease 


Number 

of 

cases 


Number 

of 
contacts 




July 28... 
Aug. 25 .. 
Nov. 10. . . 


Measles 


3 
2 

1 


7 




3 


Montclare. . . 




2 




6 


12 













" Vaccinations at the station were carried out during the year as follows: — 

Staff and dependents 74 

Crew of SS. Canadian Logger 29 

Persons detained at hospital 3 



Total. 



106 



" The persons admitted to the hospital were divided as follows with regard 
to their nationality: — 



British 

German 

Russian 

Polish 

Russian-German . 

Roumanian 

Canadian 

Swedish 

Finnish 



Flemish 

Belgian 

Hungarian — 

American 

Greek 

Jugo-Slav 

Swiss 

Tcheko-Slav. 
Norwegian 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MIMSTER li* 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 19 

" Six case? of rhickonpox, five of measles, and one of typhus fever developed 
among the contacts detained under observation at the hospital. Of tlie chicken- 
pox cases two developed nine days, three eleven tlays, and one fifteen days after 
landing. Three cases of measles developed almost on admission, one two days, 
and one three days afterwards. The case of typhus fever developed six hours 
after landing. All tlicse cases had been disinfected and isolated on admission 
to hospital with the exception of three cases of measles which showed symptoms 
of the disease on admission, and another measles case who was too young to be 
separated from the mother. 

■' One birth occurred in the Western Division during the detention of pass- 
engers ex ss. Empress of France. No deaths were recorded at the station during 
the year. 

" Besides urine examinations done at the hospital, the undermentioned 
chemical and bacteriological examinations were done at the laboratory: — 

Swabs (nose and throat) 10 

Sputum 3 

Blood for enteric fever 5 

Blood for typhus fever 5 

Water (chemical analysis) 13 

Water (bacteriological analysis) 1 

FiBCes 2 

Total 39" 

Lawlor's Island, Halifax, N.S. (Acting Quarantine Officer, Dr. Judson V. 
Graham). — " There was one death at the hospital during the year — a child being 
.held for deportation at the Immigration building as a Mongol imbecile, developed 
chickenpox, was transferred to the quarantine hospital, where it died of septi- 
cemia. 

'■ A female passenger refusing vaccination, not having been previously 
vaccinated, was taken to the station to complete the detention required by the 
regulations, but after three days' detention, at her request, she was vaccinated 
and released. 

"The ss. Caronia arrived here on July 21, reporting two cases of small- 
pox in tJie third-class. The first case was discovered by the ship's surgeon on 
July 16, with the rash well developed. The case and family, nine in all, were 
immediately isolated in the ship's hospital. The second case developed in the 
■same family, July 20, the rash appearing July 21. 

" The first-class passengers were permitted to proceed the same day and 
the third-class passengers destined to Canada, numbering 400, including the 
two sick cases, were disembarked into quarantine the following day, July 22. 
The delay in disembarking the third-class passengers was occasioned by the 
ship's agents requesting tliat the proposed action be submitted to Ottawa for 
confirmation before any passengers were disembarked into quarantine. On 
disembarking the passengers destined to Canada, the ship sailed for New York 
without being released from quarantine. 

" The 398 passengers landed into quarantine were vaccinated on July 
22 (among wliom were four who had never been previously vaccinated), also 
the attendants which accompanied them. It was necessary to revaccinate 
fifty of these, the first vaccination not showing a satisfactory reaction. On 
appearance of immunity reactions or successful takes, the passengers were 
released from quarantine, with the exception of the sick and their immediate 
families. 

" The ss. Ccdric arrived at quarantine on March 8, the ship's doctor report- 
ing that they had rejected three steerage passengers suffering from smallpox, 
at the time of embarkation at Liverpool. These three cases were picked up 
when crossing the gangway and were immediately isolated in one of the ship's 
hospitals until embarkation was completed, when they- were put ashore again. 
The ship's surgeon took all necessary precautions on the voyage, vaccinating 



12 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

all the steerage passengers with the exception of twenty-two who refa^txi to 
submit to it. These twenty-two with four members of their families accompany- 
ing were landed into cjuarantine to complete tlic period of detention required 
imder the reguhitions. However, on exphiining to tliese passengers why the 
ship's surgeon wished to vaccinate them, they requcj^ted that it be done at this 
station, and were all vaccinated by me. They were released as soon as a satis- 
factorj' reaction showed or the requires! period of detention was completed. 

" Including the passengers and attendants quarantined from the ss. Caronia, 
but exclusive of the quarantine staff and their families, there were 476 vaccina- 
tions performed at this station during the year, with the following results: 
Positive takes, 61; immunity reactions, 398. Tiie remaining 17 left before the 
result could be determined. 

" In accordance with the regulations, the entire quarantine staff and the 
members of their families resident at the station were vaccinated in Februarj', 
with the exception of one child who was successfully vaccinated last year, and 
four who arc protected by previously ha\'ing had smallpox. The results showed 
as follows: Positive takes, 3; immunity reactions, 26." 

William Head, Victoria, B.C. (Quarantine Officer, Dr. C. P. Brown). — 
" There were twenty-five sufferers from the Japanese earthquake disaster ex 
the ss. President Jefjcrson landed here September 15. They were all British. 
This station co-operated to the best of its ability in housing and caring for 
them. Mr. Skinner, of the Immigration Department, attended to them for 
that department, chiefly transportation. ISIrs. Fleming arranged the Red Cross 
assistance especially in outfitting and securing them positions. Hon. Mr. Oliver, 
Premier of British Columbia, had Colonel Ross Napier visit them to arrange 
any assistance that could be extended from the province. Miss Williams, trained 
nurse, who assisted Mrs. Fleming, was ver\- kind inileed, staying here constantly 
without pav. Three families remained in Canada. The last left the station on 
October 24" 

" Buildings generally have all been in use this year. They have been found 
to be in fit condition for occupation and use and well suited to the needs. The 
routine repairs have been carried out by our own staff, with materials pur- 
chasctl by the Public Works Department. Some minor alterations have been 
made wliich have added to their efficiency, the most important being the installa- 
tion of additional washing accommodation in the second-class detention build- 
ing and the oriental steerage quarters. Some needed furniture has also been 
suppliwi. 

" Major Quarantines: The epidemic of smallpox on the Asiatic coast has 
been severe and virulent. Five vessels, three passenger and two freighters, iu»vc 
brought smallpox. The procedure followed witli these has been, to determine the 
location of the disease among the passengers and crew, and decide wiiich classes of 
passengers and what part of the crew were to be regarded as sufficiently close 
contacts to warrant detention. Then inspect these and land those not ha\nng 
been successfully vaccinated within one year or having had smallpox. Next, 
inspect all the rest on boartl and vaccinate those who come under above category. 
Fumigate the quarters where the patient has been. As soon as the patients 
and detentions with stores and supplies are landed, release the vessel. Tiiis 
was followed witii the Empress of Australia and Asia with a delay of about 
three and one-half hours each. The Canada had a larger passenger list and all 
the oriental steerage was landed to save delay. But it was found they could 
have been inspected on board as quickly. With the freigliter Capto it was 
necessary to delay the vessel until suflScient of the crew were found immune by 
the vaccination reaction to operate the vessel. The Kurdistat} had enough men 
^•accinated recently to allow the vessel to proceed with less than three hours' 
delav. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER H 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 19 

" In this connection tiic department autliorized the enforcing of Section 29 
of the Regulations on vessels coming from San Pedro, Cal., as from Januarj^ 
31, 1924. As a consequence, two vessels arrived and were detained for vaccina- 
tion. By the immune reaction it was possible to release them in twenty-four 
hours. 

" Our difTiculty in the quarantines referred to above has been to read accur- 
ately the results of the vaccinations carried out on board by the ships' sur- 
geons. Their difTiculty has been in enforcing the vaccination of all members 
of the crew, especially a large Chinese crew. They are overcoming this by 
careful records of vaccinations performed. We have tried to have them do the 
vaccinations in the approved intracutaneous way with control, and keep records 
accordingly. By doing this here we have been able to cut the period of deten- 
tion short and lessen the number detained. 

" In connection with the smallpox situation it should be reported that last 
September outbreaks of smallpox were occurring among the Indians of this 
coast, and the suspicion was that Indians returning from Washington State 
from hop-picking were bringing it with them. I consulted with Hon. Dr. Young, 
Provincial Officer of Health for British Columbia, and as a con.sequcnce our 
department had the immigration authorities segregate all returning Indians on 
landing from the coastwise boats for inspection by the immigration medical officer, 
and vaccinate if needed. Dr. Milne at Victoria did this from September 12 to 
November 23, vaccinating 271. 

" Attention is also drawn to the number of vessels arriving with bills of 
healtli showing the presence of quarantinable disease. Smallpox was shown at 
San Pedro, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Rio de Janeiro, Algiers, Tokyo, Kobe, 
Shanghai, and Hongkong. Plague was shown at Singapore, Hongkong, Shanghai. 
Paita, Callao, Sourabaya. Typhus was shown at Algiers, Sourabaya and Sam- 
arang. 

" An attempt was made this past winter season to lessen the delay occas- 
ioned vessels through waiting at the station for daylight. Vessels were accord- 
ingly inspected after sundown, freighters till 6 p.m., and passenger boats on 
providing approved lights and conditions until 9 p.m. ; all vessels at 6 a.m. This 
has been found satisfactory so far as it goes. Roughly there were 123 vessels 
waited at the anchorage an average of six hours each during the year. Of 
course it is not meant by this that all of these vessels suffered financial draw- 
back; many of them did not, in so far as they waited subsequently for berth 
or cargo. 

" The total number of vessels inspected this year, 427, as compared with 
285 last year, shows an increase of 50 per cent. The diversified nature of the 
traffic is shown by the nationality of the vessels, the British predominating with 
46 per cent of the total: — 

British 196 

Japanese Ill 

American 69 

Norwegian 26 

Danish 10 

Dutch 7 

Spanish 3 

Italian 2 

French 1 

Nicaraguian 1 

Panamian 1 

" The wharves at the quarantine station have had constant supervision by 
Mr. Ford, District Engineer, Public Works Department. He has had extensive 
repairs carried out on both wharves, especially the small one. This was found 
in very bad condition and will need more extensive repairs as soon as possible. 



14 DEPARTMEXT OF HEALTH 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

The dolphin at the outer end of the big wharf was injured Last December durins; 
the docking of the Canada. This has been the subject of special report and 
recommendation. Mr. Ford's staff have also kept supervision of the water 
system and assisted with such repairs as our own staff could not handle." 

LEPER STATIONS 

Leper stations or lazarettos in Canada are two in number, one at Tracadie, 
N.B., of which Dr. J. A. Langis is the superintendent, and one on the Pacific 
coast at Bentinck Island, B.C., in charge of Dr. C. P. Brown, the quarantine 
oflScer at William Head. 

Lazaretto, Tracadie, N.B. — The number of patients in this institution at the 
close of the fiscal year was t€n, viz., sLx males and four females, as compared 
with eleven at the close of the previous year, one patient having died on March 
13, 1924, in the last stage of the disease. No new cases were admitted during 
the twelve-months period under review. The oldest inmate is age 78, and the 
youngest, 23. Seven are native of Tracadie, N.B.. and surrounding countn,-, all 
French Acadians; one Chinese, one of French and Scotch descent, and one 
Icelander. The following extract is from Dr. Langis' report: — 

■' Patients reported last year as arrested cases, with one exception, are 
enjoying the same good health and are contented. The last one to be admitted, 
October 6, 1922, is so much improved that we expect to return him to his family 
some time during next fiscal year. 

" With our youngest patient we had to stop the intramuscular injections of 
the Dean Derivatives. ' H.I.', in November last, on account of leprosy fever, 
■which has some similarity to hectic fever. This girl is decidedly ill and 
willing to remain in bed. We have in this case what some authors call papular 
]epro.<y. and according to their experience, thougli there is close resemblance to 
the original leprosy nodes, they are not real nodules, and are free of organism. 
We therefore, in this particular case, expect to resume the treatment with 
' H.I.' as soon as this fever stops. 

"My experience with Dr. Pomaret's arsenical preparation 'Eparseno' is not 
what I expected, after reading about its great value in the hands of Professor 
H. Gougerot, Dr. Pomaret and others. But I derive some consolation from 
what Professor Jeanselmc. the President of the Third International Congress 
of Leprosy, held in Strasbourg in 1923, says: 'Results obtained by the use of 
Amino-Arseno-Phenol, " Eparseno," ought to be submitted to a severe 
test, and a longer experimentation is necessary before judging of the 
merit of this medicine.' The same gentleman has about the same obsen-ation 
through the use he made himself of the Ethyl Esters of Chaulmoogra Oil, and the 
poor results he iiad with four of his leper patients. My oldest patient after two 
years treatment with ' H.I.' had a relapse about ten months ago, and at my 
suggestion, accepted the arsenical compound, of which we had such laudable 
reports in the treatment of leprosy. The first injection, it c.c, on the 2nd of 
October, was also given to another male patient, age 52 years, who though 
fartng well on the ' H.I.' treatment, begged to be treated with ' Eparseno'. 
Instructions were strictly followed, but within two months, after 23 c.c. had 
been injected, the old man got worse. The other patient developed a good size 
gluteal abscess after the eighteenth injection and stopped taking it with no 
apparent results. Since February he resumed the ' H.I.' injections. Tliis is 
my first experience with an abscess consequent to hypodermic, intravenous and 
intramuscular therapy to my leper patients in fifteen years. 

"A director of "the Investigation Station, United States Public Health 
Service, Kalihi Hospital, Honolulu, recently wrote: 'Leprosy is such a slow, 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 15^ 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 19 

chronic disease, so insidious and sluggish in its attack, and heretofore, at least, 
so stubbornly rebellious to therapy, that it taxes all the powers of patience and 
courage both in its victim and his medical attendant. Advantage has to be 
taken of every helpful measure for the maintenance of a steady, persistent and 
unflagging course of treatment which knows no faltering and no discourage- 
ment.' And also as Dr. Isadoro Dyer, Dean of Tulene University, Louisiana, 
has aptly said: 'Above all things indi\ddualize the leper patient; watch for 
improvement. If it does not show in three months, wait a year and longer. 
Keep on driving at the treatment until the patient dies or gets well.' Since the 
Tracadie Lazaretto has had a resident physician, this in 1896, this practise has 
been followed. We have two men on parole, the first since 1898, anrl the other 
since 1912. Both are in the same good health as when they left the Institution. 
In our wards we presently have six arrested cases, who could go on parole if they 
were capable of looking after themselves; but they are all more or less impotent. 

" I regard it a pleasant duty to express my gratitude to the staff of the 
lazaretto who have co-operated so diligently in the welfare of the lepers." 

Lazaretto, Bcntfnck Island, B.C. — At the close of the fiscal year there were 
eevcn leper patients under treatment at this colony, viz., five Chinese, one Russian 
Jew, and one Doukhobor. These are classified by Dr. Brown as follows: 
Disease checked, four; active, but improving under treatment, two; commencing 
treatment, one. 

During the year the lepers were transferred from D'Arcy Island to the new 
leper station at Bentinck Island, following its construction by the Department 
of Public Works. The new station is much more easily accessible from the Quar- 
antine Station at William Head, being but three miles distant, whereas D'Arcy 
Island is thirty miles away. This ensures close oversight of the leper colony by 
the medical ofiHcers of the Quarantine Station. 

Two new cases of leprosy were discovered in Western Canada during the 
year, and prompt arrangements were made for their removal to the lazaretto. 

One Chinese patient who had spent several years under treatment at 
D'Arcy Island was released on parole on August 22, 1923, as free from leprosy 
infection, following his examination by a medical board consisting of Dr. C. P. 
Brown, medical superintendent of the Quarantine Station, Dr. H. E. Young, 
Provincial Officer of Health for British Columbia, Dr. F. F. Undcrhill, Medical 
OfiBcer of Health for Vancouver, and Dr. R. L. Fraser, of Victoria. On returning 
for re-examination on March 29, 1924, Dr. Brown found a reappearance of 
symptoms which had previously disappeared, which led him to require the man's 
readmission for a further course of treatment. 

Dr. Brown reports that the condition of both the new cases admitted during 
the year shows encouraging improvement under the treatment being administered, 
and concludes his report by an appreciative reference to the faithful service 
rendered during the year by the lazaretto staff. 

(2) IMMIGRATION MEDICAL SERVICE 

At the large ocean ports of Canada at which immigrants regularly arrive, 
there are stationed officers of the Immigration Medical Service whose business it 
is to medically inspect each and every newly-arriving immigrant, also other 
passengers of the non-immigrant classes referred to in section 2 of the Immi- 
gration Act. exclusive of returning Canadians. Those found mentally or 
physically defective to a marked degree are " certified " as prohibited of entry 
under one or other of the subsection of sections 3 of the Immigration Act, and 
they then pass under the jurisdiction of an officer of the Department of Immi- 
gration for disposal. 



16 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

15 GEORGE V, A. 1925 

Tlie Immigration medical officer's work consists of detecting persons who 
come within the following classes of prohibited immigrants as set out in the 
Immigration Act: — 

(1) Idiots, imbeciles, epileptics, feeble-minded or insane persons — Section 
3 (a). 

(2) Persons affected with tuberculosis or other contagious or loathsome 
disease which is not curable within a reasonably short time — Section 3 (b). 

(3) Immigrants who are dumb, blind, or otherwise physically defective to 
a degree rendering them lial)le to become a public charge — Section 3 (r). 

(4) Persons of constitutional psychopathic inferiority — Section 3 (k). 

(5) Persons with chronic alcoholism — Section 3 (0- 

(6) Persons (other than those stated above) who are mentally or physi- 
cally defective to such a degree as to affect their ability to earn a living — 
Section 3 {m). 

Passengers, immigrant and non-immigrant, to the number of 138,241 were 
medically inspected at the Atlantic and Pac